How Late Are Package Stores Open In Ct?

As part of a new law passed by the state Legislature and signed by Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, package stores in Connecticut will be allowed to stay open until 10 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Sunday sales will still stop at 6 p.m. Owners can increase the number of stores they own from three to five.

Do liquor store hours change on holidays in Connecticut?

The Department of Consumer Protection’s Liquor Control Division is reminding Connecticut residents that hours for some liquor permittees change on holidays: Package stores must be closed on Christmas Day, and on New Year’s Day. Stores are allowed to be open until 10 p.m. on Mondays through Saturdays.

What time can you buy alcohol in CT?

In Connecticut, alcohol may be sold Monday through Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., unless the establishment operates under a cafe or tavern permit, in which case alcohol may be sold from 6:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. Monday through Friday or between 6:00 a.m. and 2:00 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

What time do grocery stores close on New Year’s Day?

Stores are allowed to be open until 10 p.m. on Mondays through Saturdays. Bars must be closed by 3 a.m. on New Year’s Day morning.

Is it legal to serve alcohol on Thanksgiving Day in CT?

Section 30-91 (D) of the Connecticut General Statutes states that it is illegal to sell alcohol on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Restaurants operating under a tavern permit may serve alcohol during normal operating hours on holidays.

How late can alcohol be sold in Connecticut?

Package stores may sell from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. They may sell from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. on Sundays. Restaurants and bars serve alcohol from 9 a.m. to 1 a.m. Monday through Thursday, and 9 a.m. until 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Bars must close by 2 p.m.

What time can you buy alcohol until in CT on Sunday?

HARTFORD, Conn. (CBSNewYork/AP) – Connecticut consumers are now able to purchase alcohol on Sundays. A new state law takes effect this weekend, allowing retail alcohol sales on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at package stores. Supermarkets, which already sell beer, will also be able to sell beer on Sundays.

Are liquor stores closing in CT?

State officials are not currently considering closing Connecticut package stores, according to officials from the Wine and Spirit Wholesalers (WSWC) of Connecticut.

What days are package stores closed in CT?

Package stores must remain closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. Grocery stores cannot sell beer on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, or New Year’s Day. Manufacturer permits cannot sell alcoholic liquor to go on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, or New Year’s Day.

Can minors drink with parents in CT?

In Connecticut, for example, an underage person can possess and consume alcohol if they’re with a parent or guardian.

Can a child sit at a bar in Connecticut?

The law prohibits liquor permittees and their servants or agents from allowing (1) minors to loiter on the premises where liquor is kept for sale or (2) minors, other than a minor over age 18 who is an employee or accompanied by his parent or guardian to be in a room where alcohol is served at a bar (CGS § 30-90).

What time does stop and shop sell beer in CT?

Holiday Update

Grocery/Liquor Store (Off-Premise) Sale Hours:
Monday to Saturday: 8:00am to 10:00pm Sunday: 10:00am to 6:00pm

Can you buy alcohol on Easter Sunday?

It is forbidden to sell alcohol on Good Friday and Easter Sunday, unless it comes with a meal. This means you can drink at a bar if you’re also eating, but you can’t buy a six-pack from a liquor store.

Can you buy alcohol in grocery stores in Connecticut?

​In Connecticut, grocers can sell beer while only package stores can sell wine and liquor.

Does Connecticut sell alcohol on Sundays?

(CBSNewYork/AP) – Connecticut consumers are now able to purchase alcohol on Sundays. A new state law takes effect this weekend, allowing retail alcohol sales on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at package stores. Supermarkets, which already sell beer, will also be able to sell beer on Sundays.

How late can you buy liquor in Massachusetts?

Massachusetts Liquor Laws

Grocery/Liquor Store (Off-Premise) Sale Hours:
Monday to Saturday: 8:00am to 11:00pm Sunday: 10:00am to 11:00pm

Can you sell alcohol on New Year’s day in Connecticut?

Connecticut State Department of Consumer Protection

In such towns, the reduced hours mandated by local governance take precedence over State law. Tomorrow, New Year’s Day, package stores must remain closed; grocery stores may be open but the sale of beer or wine is prohibited.

Are liquor stores open July 4th in CT?

Liquor stores can stay open on Friday, July 4, from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., according to the state Department of Consumer Protection.

Are liquor stores closed on Labor Day in CT?

As reported by Legal Beer, the following states do not have state-controlled liquor sales and distribution: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South

Are liquor stores open on Christmas CT?

Connecticut State Department of Consumer Protection

Package stores must be closed on Christmas Day, and on New Year’s Day.

Liquor Control Reminds Connecticut Residents about Package Store and Bar Hours during the Holidays

11/23/2021

Liquor Control Reminds Connecticut Residents about Package Store and Bar Hours during the Holidays

  • 23rd of November, 2021 – It is the responsibility of the Department of Consumer Protection (DCP) Liquor Control Division to warn Connecticut citizens that the hours of operation for some liquor permittees alter on holidays: Consumption away from the premises: Grocery shops are not permitted to sell alcohol on the days of Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve
  • package stores must remain closed on these days
  • and package stores must remain closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Day.
  • On Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day, manufacturers with manufacturer permits are not permitted to sell alcoholic beverages to go.
  • On-premise consumption: Regular business hours will be maintained, with the exception that all establishments must shut by 3 a.m. on New Year’s Day morning
  • local zoning regulations may impose harsher restrictions on both off- and on-premise sales
  1. ″With the return of Christmas gatherings and festivities this year, we hope that everyone has a pleasant and safe holiday season,″ said Consumer Protection Commissioner Michelle H.
  2. Seagull.
  3. ″We hope that everyone has a fun and safe holiday season.″ It is our hope that anyone choosing to consume alcohol would make appropriate decisions, including knowing their limit, arranging designated drivers, and being respectful of the places and communities in which they are celebrating,″ said the organization.
  4. Anyone who has issues or complaints about a liquor permittee in the State of Connecticut is invited to contact the DCP’s Liquor Control Division by email at [email protected] or by phone at (860) 713-6210.
  5. The Liquor Control Division is located in the Department of Consumer Protection.
  6. Twitter: DCP’s official Twitter account Contact information for the media: Kaitlyn Krasselt, DCP on Facebook Call or write to Kaitlyn Krasselt at (860) 713-6019 (office) or (860) 377-0246 (cell) (cell)

Package Store Hours

  1. On January 21, 1998, the topic of LIQUOR and BLUE LAWS was discussed.
  2. The location of BLUE LAWS was also discussed.
  3. FROM: Dan Duffy, Principal Analyst TO: Dan Duffy RE: Hours of Operation for the Package Store It was brought to our attention that package stores are obliged to shut on Sundays as well as at 8:00 p.m.
  4. on other days of the week, and that this is in addition to the Sunday and closing time rules in surrounding states.
  5. SUMMARY When prohibition was lifted, the prohibition-era restriction on Sunday liquor sales was enacted.
  6. There are no legislative records from that time period available to us.
  1. In 1939, the closing hour was established at 11:00 p.m.
  2. In 1957, the time was changed to 9:00 p.m.
  3. In response to Mad Dog Taborski’s wave of homicides, package shop owners backed the early closing time, arguing that they needed shorter working hours and were concerned about being targeted by robbers.
  4. The closing time was raised to 8:00 p.m.
  5. ten years later, at the insistence of the package shop organization once more.
  6. It is legal for package stores in Massachusetts to remain open until 11:00 p.m.

and until midnight in New York.The state of Rhode Island allows businesses in the state to remain open until 10:00 p.m.in the winter and 11:00 p.m.in the summer.Sales on Sundays are normally prohibited in all three of these states.

THE HISTORY OF THE LAST ONE HOUR This law was passed in 1933 and is known as the Liquor Control Act.It permitted package shops to sell alcoholic beverages until 6:00 p.m.Alcohol and beer were not permitted to be sold at drug stores and grocery stores.Two years later, pharmacy shops were granted authority to sell alcoholic beverages for consumption off-premises until 11:00 p.m.

  • In 1939, package shop proprietors petitioned for and were granted permission to remain open until 11:00 p.m.
  • When the package store owners successfully petitioned to raise the closing time for booze sales to 9:00 p.m.
  • for all vendors in 1957, it was the culmination of years of effort.
  • Ten years later, they were successful in raising the time to 8:00.

1957 HEARING IN THE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC The General Assembly amended the state constitution in 1957 to change the closing time for off-premises liquor sales from 11:00 p.m.to 9:00 p.m.″An Act Concerning the Regulation of the Hours and Days of Closing of Premises Selling Liquor for Off-Premises Consumption,″ which was heard by the Liquor Control Committee, was another measure to raise the closing hour (HB 727).

On March 28, 1957, a hearing was held in this matter.As stated by Nathan Kasowitz, President of the Connecticut Package Store Association (CPSA), passage of the bill is in the public’s interest because it (1) would allow store owners ″more time for civic activities,″ (2) would relieve police officers from the responsibility of monitoring the isolated areas where package stores are located after the hours of 8:00 p.m., and (3) would reduce sales to minors.Members of many local package store groups as well as shop owners followed Kasowitz on the tour.They frequently emphasized the need of business owners working fewer hours.

Sherman Weiner said that he had served as the chairman of a CPSA committee designed to investigate hold-ups and how to avoid them.Following ″a very comprehensive investigation,″ the committee discovered that the majority of robberies took place after dark, and ″a set of preventions was developed and distributed.″ Closing at 8:00 ″will immediately take three hours away from the time the hold-up man may operate,″ he explained.He was referring to Mad Dog Taborski and his sidekick Culombe, according to the transcript.While the two insane murders have been apprehended in Connecticut, we package store employees and our families continue to live in terror of the hold-up thugs.A series of robberies, pistol whippings, and execution-style killings had been performed by Taborski and Culombe in late 1956 and early 1957, resulting in the deaths of six people.1957 DEBATE IN THE LEGISLATIVE HOUSE The amendment was included in the measure to increase the price of alcoholic beverages by the Senate.

  • When Senator Kopacz sought for reconsideration of the measure on May 24, the law had already passed both the House and the Senate in its current form.
  • The amendment was ratified on May 27th of this year.
  • In addition to requiring package shops to shut on three extra holidays, including Memorial Day, Thanksgiving Day, and New Year’s Day, the amendment mandated that they close on three additional weekends.
  1. The amendment was approved by voice vote after the chair was upheld on a point of order about the amendment’s germaneness.
  2. On May 29, the Senate took up the measure for a second time and voted to pass it.
  3. The modification had not been authorized by the Office of the Legislative Commissioner.
  4. With the exception of the fact that it is now appropriately worded, the Senate accepted another amendment.
  5. In the words of its sponsor, Senator Kopacz, ″it is precisely the same as amendment ″A″ with the exception that it is now correctly written.″ On June 3, the House of Representatives took up the modified measure.

Representative Quinlan provided a succinct summary.Members expressed their dissatisfaction with the fact that a copy of the amendment was not made readily accessible to them.Quinlan refused to comply with the Speaker’s request to withdraw his motion in order for the bill to be passed and copies to be produced.It was getting close to the end of the session, he continued, and all of the interest groups, including package store owners, pharmacy store owners, and supermarket owners, were in accord, so ″we could just wait till tomorrow and have the same outcome.″ The amendment was accepted by voice vote in the House, and the Speaker ordered that the bill and amendment be printed before informing the chamber that the altered measure will be reviewed the following day.The law was debated two days later, on the penultimate day of the session, and passed unanimously.

During the introduction of the bill, Representative Cipriano and Representative Lombardo spoke about the bill’s previous history in the Liquor Control Committee.In his remarks, Cipriano noted that the modification represented a middle ground between the initial eight o’clock plan and the existing eleven o’clock closing hour.Lombardo was vocal in his opposition to the bill, pointing out that it had been rejected twice by the liquor committee.

  1. On a voice vote, the modified bill was approved.
  2. 1967 HEARING IN THE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC The hearing opened with testimonies from 27 politicians, all of whom indicated support with the exception of one.
  3. The other stated that he was ″smack dab in the center of things on this one.″ The hearing room was jam-packed with people who were in favor of the measure.
  4. Package shop owners expressed concern about the dangers of having their businesses open after 7:00 p.m., the closing time specified in the law as originally worded.
  5. They also stated that the clear majority of package shop proprietors were in favor of shorter working hours as well.
  1. Owners would have the opportunity to ″perform some social work and some community service″ if they closed sooner, they said.
  2. The majority of those who spoke out against the measure represented the grocery industry, but there were also some package store owners who expressed concern that the bill would lead them to lose money as a result of the legislation.
  3. According to officials from food stores, the law is anti-competitive in its design and implementation.
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They also stated that the measure would create challenges for grocery stores, which would be forced to cover shelves and turn people away from the registers as a result of the legislation.In their arguments, they cited the fact that customers would drive from other states to purchase, that it would encourage after-hours bootlegging, and that legislators should consider the convenience of the general public rather than the convenience of package store owners.Finally, they stated that package retailers are not required to remain open under the terms of the statute.1967 DEBATE IN THE LEGISLATIVE HOUSE The measure was presented by Representative Esposito.

The points from the hearing were reiterated by him and a large number of other bill speakers, both for and against the legislation.They also mentioned getting a huge number of phone calls and letters from partisans on both sides of the conflict.According to Esposito, the liquor sector is already the most heavily regulated industry in the state, and package store operators are barred from selling other goods such as fruit, band aids, and medications.The measure was passed with a large margin of victory.Senator Hickey presented an amendment to the measure in the Senate, which changed the closing time from 7:00 p.m.to 8:00 p.m.

instead of 7:00 p.m.Following extensive debate, the amendment and the measure were approved by voice vote.The amendment was approved by the House without any debate.

  • SALES IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD STATES.
  • It is legal for a package shop to sell liquor between the hours of 8:00 am and 11:00 pm on Monday through Friday in Massachusetts (ALM T.
  • 138 15) and between the hours of 8:00 am and midnight on Saturday and Sunday in New York (New York Alco.
  1. Beverage Control Law 105).
  2. The sale of liquor in a package store in Rhode Island is permitted from November 1 through May 31, and from June 1 through October 31, according to Rhode Island General Statutes 3-8-1 and 3-8-2, and the sale of liquor is permitted from November 1 through May 31, according to the Rhode Island General Statutes.
  3. DD:lc

Package Store Days and Hours of Sale

Location:LIQUOR; Scope:Connecticut laws/regulations; Topics:LEGISLATION, LIQUOR, HOURS OF WORK, BLUE LAW

September 19, 2000 2000-R-0918
PACKAGE STORE DAYS AND HOURS OF SALE
By: Daniel Duffy, Principal Analyst
  1. You inquired as to whether any current legislation pertaining to package store booze sales on Sundays and evenings had been passed.
  2. Moreover, you were interested in learning more about the history of the prohibition on Sunday sales and the mandated closing time of 8:00 p.m.
  3. SUMMARY Sunday sales will be permitted on December 24, 2000 and December 31, 2000, according to legislation passed by the General Assembly earlier this year.
  4. The prohibition on Sunday sales came to an end upon the conclusion of Prohibition.
  5. There have been various modifications to the package shop closure time.
  6. Package retailers were obligated to close at 6:00 p.m.
  1. under the terms of the Liquor Control Act as originally adopted.
  2. In 1939, package shop owners petitioned for and were granted legislation to extend the closing time to 11:00 p.m.
  3. in order to compete with pharmacy stores.
  4. In 1957, the legislature modified the legislation to have all off-premises liquor retailers close their doors at 9:00 p.m.
  5. The regulation stayed intact till now.
  6. In 1967, the government modified the statute once more, this time setting the present closing time of 8:00 p.m.

CLOSURE ON SUNDAY The prohibition on liquor sales on Sundays was part of the original Liquor Control Act, which was implemented in 1933 after the conclusion of Prohibition and brought the country out of the Great Depression.It is not possible to obtain information on the legislative rationale for the ban because neither the parliamentary procedures nor the public hearings were recorded or transcribed.This year, the General Assembly decided to loosen the restrictions on Sunday sales a little bit.In December 2000, it passed laws enabling package shops, supermarkets, and pharmacy stores with liquor licenses to sell on Sundays, December 24th and December 31st of that year, respectively (PA 00-1, June Special Session).This year, the Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays fall on a Monday, rather than a Friday or Saturday.

THE HISTORY OF THE LAST ONE HOUR When Prohibition was overturned, package stores were allowed to sell until 6:00 p.m.on Fridays and Saturdays.Two years later, the law enabled pharmacy stores to sell alcoholic beverages and extended their hours of operation until 11:00 p.m.In 1939, package shop proprietors were successful in their attempt to get legislation allowing them to remain open until 11:00 p.m.

  • After many unsuccessful attempts, the package shop organization was able to persuade the government to pass laws prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages after 9:00 p.m.
  • for all vendors in 1957.
  • When the group was formed in 1967, it was successful in having the statutory closing hour for all vendors raised to 8:00 p.m.
  • 1957 HEARING IN THE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC The General Assembly amended the state constitution in 1957 to change the closing time for off-premises liquor sales from 11:00 p.m.

to 9:00 p.m.Another measure to raise the closing hour had been introduced and considered by the Liquor Control Committee, titled ″An Act Concerning the Regulation of the Hours and Days of Closing of Premises Selling Liquor for Off-Premises Consumption,″ which would have increased the closing hour by one hour (HB 727).On March 28, 1957, a hearing was held in this matter.

As stated by Nathan Kasowitz, President of the Connecticut Package Store Association (CPSA), passage of the bill is in the public’s interest because it (1) would allow store owners ″more time for civic activities,″ (2) would relieve police officers from the responsibility of monitoring the isolated areas where package stores are located after the hours of 8:00 p.m., and (3) would reduce sales to minors.Members of many local package store groups as well as shop owners followed Kasowitz on the tour.They frequently emphasized the need of business owners working fewer hours.Sherman Weiner said that he had served as the chairman of a CPSA committee designed to investigate hold-ups and how to avoid them.

Following ″a very comprehensive investigation,″ the committee discovered that the majority of robberies took place after dark, and ″a set of preventions was developed and distributed.″ Closing at 8:00 ″will immediately take three hours away from the time the hold-up man may operate,″ he explained.He was referring to Mad Dog Taborski and his sidekick Culombe, according to the transcript.While the two insane murders have been apprehended in Connecticut, we package store employees and our families continue to live in terror of the hold-up thugs.A series of robberies, pistol whippings, and execution-style killings had been performed by Taborski and Culombe in late 1956 and early 1957, resulting in the deaths of six people.1957 DEBATE IN THE LEGISLATIVE HOUSE The Senate included the change in a measure to increase the price of alcoholic beverages.When Senator Kopacz sought for reconsideration of the measure on May 24, the law had already passed both the House and the Senate in its current form.

  • The amendment was ratified on May 27th of this year.
  • In addition to requiring package shops to shut on three extra holidays, including Memorial Day, Thanksgiving Day, and New Year’s Day, the amendment mandated that they close on three additional weekends.
  • The amendment was approved by voice vote after the chair was upheld on a question of order over the appropriateness of the proposal.
  1. On May 29, the Senate took up the measure for a second time and voted to pass it.
  2. The modification had not been authorized by the Office of the Legislative Commissioner.
  3. With the exception of the fact that ″it is now correctly written,″ another amendment was accepted by the Senate.
  4. According to Senator Kopacz, who sponsored it, this amendment was, ″exactly the same as amendment A″ with the exception of the fact that ″it is now correctly written.″ On June 3, the House of Representatives took up the modified measure.
  5. Representative Quinlan provided a succinct summary.

Members expressed their dissatisfaction with the fact that a copy of the amendment was not made readily accessible to them.When the Speaker asked Quinlan to withdraw his motion so that the House of Representatives could examine other legislation while copies were being prepared, Quinlan said no and refused.It was getting close to the end of the session, he continued, and all of the interest groups, including package store owners, pharmacy store owners, and supermarket owners, were in accord, so ″we could just wait till tomorrow and have the same outcome.″ Using a voice vote, the Speaker ordered that the bill and amendment be printed, informing the chamber that they would be considered the following day if they were still in favor of the amendment.The bill was discussed on the penultimate day of the session, two days after it was introduced.During the introduction of the bill, Representative Cipriano and Representative Lombardo spoke about the bill’s previous history in the Liquor Control Committee.

In his remarks, Cipriano noted that the modification represented a middle ground between the initial eight o’clock plan and the existing eleven o’clock closing hour.Lombardo was vocal in his opposition to the bill, pointing out that it had been rejected twice by the liquor committee.On a voice vote, the modified bill was approved.

  1. 1967 HEARING IN THE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC The hearing opened with testimonies from 27 politicians, all of whom indicated support with the exception of one.
  2. The other stated that he was ″smack dab in the center of things on this one.″ The hearing room was jam-packed with people who were in favor of the measure.
  3. It was noted that package shop owners were concerned about the dangers of having their businesses open after 7:00 p.m., which was the initial closing time in the law.
  4. A survey of package shop operators revealed that the great majority of them favored a reduction in working hours.
  5. Owners would have the opportunity to ″perform some social work and some community service″ if they closed sooner, they said.
  1. The majority of those who spoke against the measure were from the grocery industry, although some package shop owners expressed concern that the plan would lead them to lose money.
  2. Several representatives from food stores said that the legislation was anti-competitive.
  3. People who wanted to purchase booze, they said, would be turned away by grocery stores, which would be forced to cover shelves and turn away customers who wanted to purchase liquor.

They also pointed out that consumers would go to other states to purchase booze, that the earlier closing time would encourage after-hour bootlegging, and that politicians should consider the convenience of the general public rather than the benefit of package store owners.Finally, they noted that the present legislation does not impose any obligations on package retailers to remain in business.1967 DEBATE IN THE LEGISLATIVE HOUSE The measure was presented by Representative Esposito.The points from the hearing were reiterated by him and a large number of other bill speakers, both for and against the legislation.

They also mentioned that they had received a great number of phone calls and letters from supporters on both sides of the conflict.Defending his plan against accusations of anti-competitiveness, Esposito pointed out that it already has the highest level of regulation in the state and that package store owners are forbidden from selling other goods such as fruit, band aids, and medications.The measure was passed with a large margin of victory.Senator Hickey, who submitted an amendment to modify the closing time from 7:00 p.m.to 8:00 p.m., was the one who carried the measure out of committee in the Senate.After a lengthy debate, the amendment and the law were approved by voice vote after much deliberation.

The amendment was approved by the House without any debate.DD:eh

Package Store Holidays

HOLIDAYS; LEGISLATION; LIQUOR; LOCATIONS; SCOPE:Connecticut laws/regulations;

April 11, 2000 2000-R-0436
PACKAGE STORE HOLIDAYS
By: Dan Duffy, Principal Analyst
  1. The question was raised as to whether or not the Legislature has amended the list of holidays on which package merchants are not permitted to sell and when this change occurred.
  2. In addition, you requested a list of state holidays.
  3. SUMMARY The Liquor Control Act was passed in 1933 as a result of the repeal of Prohibition’s prohibition on alcoholic beverages.
  4. Additionally, the rule prevented package retailers from selling on Good Friday and Christmas Day, in addition to Sundays.
  5. With the exception of the apparent religious importance of these days, there is no formal record of the legislative session’s deliberations.
  6. The General Assembly expanded the list of federal holidays in 1957, including Decoration (Memorial) Day, Thanksgiving Day, and New Year’s Day.
  1. The bill’s debate centered on the simultaneous reduction in hours of sale, from 11:00 p.m.
  2. to 9:00 p.m., which was the focus of the dispute.
  3. When the Liquor Control Committee heard testimony on a related measure, it was expressed concern over a proposed restriction in the hours of sale that may be permitted.
  4. Sales were restricted on Independence Day and Labor Day by an act of the General Assembly passed in 1971.
  5. In the discussion, participants discussed the need of keeping stores open for the general public as well as the importance of allowing package store owners to have time off.
  6. There are 12 state holidays in the United States.

They include all of the days on which package shops are not permitted to sell alcoholic beverages.Others are Martin Luther King Day, Lincoln’s Birthday, Washington’s Birthday, Columbus Day, and Veterans’ Day, to name just a few.1957 In 1957, the General Assembly passed legislation prohibiting the sale of package liquor on Decoration Day, Thanksgiving Day, and New Year’s Day.With the passage of Senate Amendment ″B″ to House Law 1048, the bill was amended to include an outright prohibition on holiday sales.According to the modification, the bill that was introduced in the Liquor Control Committee had failed to pass.

There was one difference between it and the bill: it required package retailers to shut at 9:00 p.m.rather than 8:00 p.m.as required by the bill.The earlier law (House Bill 727) was the subject of public hearing evidence, and it appears that the plan, which imposed an earlier closing hour as well as shutting on three extra holidays, was meant to assist package store owners and operators.

  • Each and every piece of testimony dealt with the idea to force package merchants to close their doors at 8:00 p.m.
  • A number of justifications for the measure have been offered, including a shorter work week for package shop owners, more opportunities for package store owners to participate in civic activities, a reduction in sales to minors, and a reduction in murders and hold-ups.
  • The law was enacted by the Senate with minimal debate on the substance of the legislation.
  • The primary focus of the House discussion, as well as the public hearing comments, was the reduction in working hours.
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On the subject of holidays, the bill’s proponent responded to one query by explaining that the bill barred sales on three additional holidays in addition to the two already forbidden by law.1971 In 1971, the General Assembly passed legislation prohibiting package retailers from selling alcoholic beverages on Independence Day and Labor Day.The law was passed by unanimous consent in the House, with no discussion.

It was sponsored by Senator Dupont on the grounds that it would allow the proprietors of family-owned package stores to enjoy the holidays.Senator Alfano spoke out against the legislation.As a result, the general population, particularly working men who want to buy a six pack on vacation but are not fortunate enough to be able to store up so that they ″have an appropriate quantity on hand, when the vacation arrives,″ are at a disadvantage.Among those speaking out against the bill were Senator Rimer, who stated that it would be detrimental to families who might want to pick up a six-pack of beer on their way to the beach.

During his testimony, Senator Power stated that the bill will be detrimental to the working man who works long hours.Senator Fauliso voted in favor of the legislation.He expressed his appreciation for the concept of spending the two holidays as ″calm days″ with his family.His remarks were followed by a statement saying the law was consistent with efforts to combat drunk driving.Senator Fauliso received the backing of Senator Lieberman.DD:ro

Connecticut Alcohol Laws: Small State, Big Surprise

  1. This article will assist you in understanding Connecticut’s alcohol laws so that you can avoid costly penalties or perhaps jail time.
  2. Not to mention the wasted time and humiliation it caused.
  3. Residents and tourists to Connecticut are both subject to the state’s alcohol regulations.
  4. The state is in close proximity to a number of other states.
  5. Some of the alcohol laws in certain states are different from one another.
  6. As a result, visitors should bear this in mind.
  1. Overview I.
  2. Minimum drinking ages for alcoholic beverages Violations of the Alcohol Policy Resources are the third point to mention.
  3. Get Legal Counsel, Option IV.
  4. Even within a single state, alcohol regulations range.
  5. The same may be said regarding the rigor with which laws are enforced.
  6. Accidentally breaching the law is not a legal defense in most cases.

I. Alcohol Minimum Ages

  1. Young individuals frequently look for part-time work.
  2. There are several benefits to working in the hospitality industry.
  3. They are frequently accompanied with alcoholic beverages.
  4. Youths must be aware of the appropriate ages for them.
  5. For example, what age is required to offer alcoholic beverages at a restaurant?
  6. To be a bartender?
  1. Or to sell alcoholic beverages for consumption away from the premises?
  2. They have a right to know.
  3. As a result, we inform them.
  4. Adults are permitted to offer alcoholic beverages in restaurants under Connecticut’s alcohol regulations.
  5. Adults, of course, are individuals who are 18 years old or older.
  6. They could work at a bar.

They may also sell alcoholic beverages for consumption away from the premises.There are no distinctions made between beer, wine, and liquor (distilled spirits).Connecticut does not have a legislation prohibiting anybody under the age of 21 from consuming alcoholic beverages.The alcohol must be provided by a parent or guardian for them to consume it.They are not permitted to purchase alcoholic beverages.

In order to demystify alcohol and promote moderation in their children, many parents choose to drink alongside their children.They believe that it is preferable for young kids to learn to drink at the home of their parents rather than in a fraternity house.Using a fraudulent identification card to purchase alcohol is a criminal offense.It is possible that your driver’s license will be suspended as a result of your actions.

  • It is also illegal to create, transmit, lend, or sell a forged identification card.
  • Retailers may seize identification cards that look to be forged.
  • It is prohibited for anybody under the age of 21 to drive with a blood alcohol content (BAC) greater than 0.02.

II. More Connecticut Alcohol Laws

A. Selling Alcohol

  1. Part-time occupations are popular among young people.
  2. There are several benefits to being in the hospitality business.
  3. In most cases, alcohol is involved.
  4. They must be aware of the minimum age requirements.
  5. For example, what age must a person be in order to offer alcoholic beverages at a restaurant is unclear.
  6. Are you looking to work at a bar or restaurant?
  1. Or to sell alcoholic beverages to be consumed elsewhere?
  2. They have a right to be aware of the situation.
  3. We inform them of this.
  4. Adults may be served alcoholic beverages in restaurants under Connecticut’s alcohol regulations.
  5. The term ″adult″ refers to someone beyond the age of 18.
  6. Some of them may work at a bar or restaurant.

Alcohol for use off-site may also be available.Neither beer nor wine nor liquor are treated differently (distilled spirits).Alcohol use by anybody under the age of 21 is not prohibited in Connecticut.They must be provided with alcohol by a parent or guardian.The purchase of alcoholic beverages is prohibited.

In order to demystify alcohol and promote moderation in their children, many parents choose to drink alongside their kids.Rather than at a fraternity house, they believe it is preferable for young people to learn to drink at home.False identification is prohibited while purchasing alcoholic beverages.A driver’s license suspension may result as a result of this action.

  • Creating, transferring, lending, or selling a fictitious identification card is also a criminal.
  • When a customer’s ID appears to be fraudulent, retailers may take the card.
  • Anyone under the age of 21 who has a blood alcohol content (BAC) more than 0.02 is prohibited from operating a vehicle.

B. Buying Alcohol

  1. Anyone under the age of 21 is prohibited from purchasing alcoholic beverages under Connecticut law.
  2. The penalty for doing so is, at the very least, $200.
  3. However, it is possible that it may be as much as $500.
  4. When someone makes a false statement when attempting to purchase alcohol, it is considered a simple infraction.
  5. Using a fictitious identification card, on the other hand, is considered a felony.
  6. This carries a sentence of up to 30 days in prison as a punishment.
  1. In addition, a fine of at least $200 is imposed.
  2. However, the fine may be as high as $500.
  3. Anyone under the age of 21 is prohibited from possessing alcoholic beverages.
  4. At the very least, the state punishes it with a fine of $200.
  5. However, it is possible that it will be as high as $500.
  6. Those found guilty of illegally purchasing or possessing alcoholic beverages risk further penalties.

Their driving privileges may be revoked by the state.It is possible that the state will take longer to get them a license if they do not currently have one in hand.Purchasing or having powdered alcohol (palcohol) is prohibited in the United States.The penalty for doing so is a $100 fine.Wine and spirits are subject to a minimum pricing law in Connecticut.

As a result, the state is no longer competitive with its neighbors.As a result, many residents cross the state boundary to save money on their utility bills.

C. Driving and Alcohol

  1. Operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs is a criminal violation in Connecticut, according to the state’s alcohol laws.
  2. The prosecution does not need direct evidence of a person’s blood alcohol content (BAC).
  3. Only whether or not a person’s ability to drive was affected is relevant.Connecticut alcohol laws prohibit driving when one’s capacity to drive has been impaired by alcohol and/or drugs.This is normally assessed by measuring (actually estimating) blood alcohol concentration levels (BAC).
  4. It is unlawful to have a reading of 0.08 percent or more.
  5. When driving a car with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.025 percent or higher, an ignition interlock device (IID) stops the vehicle from starting.
  6. When driving a vehicle with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.02 percent or higher, the prohibition is 0.02 percent or higher.
  1. Before reinstating the license, the state demands an IID from the applicant.
  2. Following restoration, the IID must be maintained for at least the period of time specified.
  3. Aside from that, the driver is responsible for any and all installation, maintenance, and monitoring charges.
  4. And they are really expensive.

    First Conviction

  • Fines of at least $500 and imprisonment ranging from two days to six months. However, it is possible that it may be as high as $1,000.
  • License suspension for one year, and IID for six months are both in effect. (For drivers under the age of 21, the period is one year.) Furthermore, the offender is required to pay the expenses of the case
  • Within ten years, a second conviction was obtained. Fines of at least $1,000 and imprisonment for 120 days to two years are possible penalties. However, the fine might be as high as $4,000
  • License suspension for one year, as well as IID for one year, respectively. (Two years for drivers under the age of twenty-one.)

   Third Conviction within Ten Years

  • Prison sentences ranging from one to three years and fines of at least $2,000. However, it is possible that it will be up to $8,000
  • License is revoked for the rest of one’s life

Driver Rights

  1. All drivers in the United States have the right, under the United States Constitution, to refuse to submit to a chemical breathalyzer test.
  2. Those who exercise their right, on the other hand, are subject to punishment by the state.
  3. When drivers exercise their right for the first time, their license is suspended for six months.
  4. On the second incident, the ban is for a period of one year.
  5. The use of their right for a third time results in a three-year ban.
  6. The state, on the other hand, does not impose a punishment for refusing to submit to a field sobriety test.
  1. These are highly subjective and extremely erroneous in their results.
  2. In reality, almost one-third of persons who are entirely sober fail field sobriety tests.
  3. That is, approximately one out of every three persons who have a zero blood alcohol content (0.00 percent) fail them.
  4. As a result, attorneys highly warn drivers to avoid using them.
  5. They advise you to respectfully decline.
  6. And to repeat the process as many times as necessary.

The police have a variety of compelling methods for pressuring drivers into submission.They frequently assert that it is required by law, which is untrue.In reality, there is no legal requirement for it.They may claim that it can be used to establish the driver’s innocence.However, according to the authorities, passing the exam does not imply sobriety.

As a result, passing does not benefit the driver.Police officers have the legal right to lie when conducting an investigation.Don’t let this happen to you!More information may be found at Never Take a Field Sobriety Test, Say DUI Attorneys.

D. Boating and Alcohol

  1. Boating while under the influence of alcohol is prohibited in Connecticut (BUI).
  2. To put it another way, operating a boat or personal watercraft while under the influence of alcohol and/or any substance is prohibited.
  3. The use of water skis, wakeboards, and other similar devices is prohibited.
  4. Boaters 21 and older who have a blood alcohol content (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more are considered to be under the influence.
  5. For boaters under the age of 21, the percentage is 0.02 percent or higher.

   Penalties for a first conviction may be these.

  • Required to serve between 48 hours and six months in prison
  • A fine of at least $500 is imposed. However, it is possible that it will be as high as $1,000.
  • A one-year suspension of one’s boating license
  • 100 hours of community service as part of a probationary period

   Penalties for 2nd conviction in 10 years may be these.

  • A sentence of 120 days to two years in prison was required.
  • A fine of at least $1,000 will be levied. However, it is possible that it will be as high as $4,000
  • License to operate a boat suspended for three years
  • 100 hours of community service as part of a probationary period

   Penalties 3rd+ or conviction in ten years may be.

  • Required jail time ranging from one to three years.
  • A fine of at least $2,000 will be levied. According to the other hand, it might reach up to $8,000.
  • License to operate a boat will be suspended for life.
  • 100 hours of community service as part of a probationary period

The consequences of exercising one’s right not to submit to a BAC breath test are more severe than the consequences of failing one.

III. Resources on Connecticut Alcohol Laws

  • Legislative Information
  • Supreme Court and Appellate Court Opinions
  • Attorney General Opinions
  • Liquor Control Commission
  • Connecticut Bar Association
  • State Code

IV. Get Good Advice about Drinking Laws in Connecticut

  1. Connecticut’s alcohol regulations might be difficult to comprehend.
  2. The same is true in other parts of the world.
  3. Laws are subject to change.
  4. The interpretation of the law changes from time to time.
  5. They may be at odds with one another.
  6. It needs legal training to comprehend what they are saying.
  1. And practicing law is not a do-it-yourself project.
  2. As a result, never rely on this website.
  3. Neither on this nor any other website.
  4. And never, ever rely on family or friends for support.
  5. Neither on their neighbors nor on their coworkers.
  6. Their opinions and views are well worth the money they charge.

That is, not a great deal.Get professional guidance about Connecticut’s alcohol regulations from a knowledgeable source.That is a lawyer who is licensed to practice law in the state.It’s also a good idea to choose a lawyer who has experience practicing in the area in question.

New State Law Allows Connecticut Consumers To Buy Alcohol On Sundays

  1. CBS News / May 20, 2012 / 11:16 a.m.
  2. New York is the capital of the United States.
  3. (CBSNewYork/AP) HARTFORD, Conn.
  4. (CBSNewYork/AP) Customers in Connecticut will now be permitted to purchase alcoholic beverages on Sundays.
  5. A new state legislation goes into effect this weekend, enabling package shops to sell alcoholic beverages to customers on Sundays from 10 a.m.
  6. to 5 p.m.
  1. Supermarkets, which currently sell beer, will be permitted to expand their product offerings on Sundays.
  2. Fran Schneidau of WCBS 880 in New York City has the latest.
See also:  Why Does My Amazon Package Say Undeliverable?

Podcast

  1. The audio element cannot be played because your browser does not support it.
  2. The new legislation also permits for the sale of alcoholic beverages on federal holidays such as Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day, as well as on the Monday after any Independence Day, Christmas, or New Year’s Day that falls on a Saturday or Sunday.
  3. For years, package store owners battled against initiatives to allow Sunday sales in their establishments.
  4. Nonetheless, this year, they did so only grudgingly because some of them had more reservations about other sections of the law, which were pushed by Gov.
  5. Dannel P.
  6. Malloy and which would have an impact on pricing and other issues.
  1. Those amendments were not enacted into law and will be addressed by a task committee in the near future.
  2. Connecticut people can now delight at the knowledge that Fill in the blanks with your opinions and observations in the space below.
  3. (CBS Radio Inc.
  4. and its respective companies own the trademarks and copyright.) Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc., CBS RADIO, and EYE Logos TM and Copyright 2012.
  5. This is a licensed use.
  6. All Intellectual Property Rights are Reserved.

This information may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without the prior written permission of the author.This piece was written with assistance from the Associated Press.) In: the holiday season

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No Plans to Close CT Package Stores: WSWC

  1. If you’re looking forward to a hard drink during these tough times, there’s some good news for you.
  2. According to representatives from the Wine and Spirit Wholesalers of Connecticut (WSWC), state officials are not currently considering shutting Connecticut package shops.
  3. Larry Cafero, executive director of the Washington State Water Control Commission, said he met with the governor’s office on Wednesday and was assured that a closure of package shops is not being considered at this time.
  4. Cafero stated that Carroll Hughes of the Connecticut Police Chiefs Association (CPSA), who also represents the state’s police chiefs, had expressed concerns about the possibility of ″lawlessness″ if package stores were to close and consumers were unable to purchase wine or spirits, given the ban already in place for restaurants and bars.
  5. Businesses in Connecticut have been instructed to discontinue all in-house meals and just provide take-out alternatives, and they are not permitted to provide alcoholic beverages.
  6. In an effort to stem the spread of the coronavirus, the governor has also issued orders to close gyms, casinos, movie theaters, malls, bowling alleys, and amusement parks.
  1. The states of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania have all passed similar legislation.
  2. 97 people in Connecticut have tested positive for COVID-19 thus far, with one person dying as a result of the virus.

States that allow underage drinking – kind of

  1. The legislation is well-established and widely recognized — anyone wishing to lawfully consume alcoholic beverages in the United States must be at least 21 years old.
  2. However, depending on the position in which you find yourself, whether or not that response is explicitly true may differ.
  3. This is due to the fact that many state statutes provide for exceptions to the rule.
  4. At least three dozen states have laws on the books that make exceptions to the general rule of whether minors can possess or consume alcoholic beverages in the United States.
  5. As a condition of obtaining state transportation money, states are required to prevent anyone under the age of 21 from purchasing or openly possessing alcoholic beverages under the terms of the 1984 National Minimum Drinking Age Act.
  6. Many jurisdictions, however, make exceptions for activities that can be carried out in a private house or with a parent.
  1. The data journalists at HealthGrove looked at states that had exceptions to the rule and also took note of the incidence of underage drinking in each location.
  2. It’s a difficult matter, and anyone interested in learning more about the specifics of their state’s laws can utilize the Alcohol Policy Information System’s state lookup tool to do it.
  3. In Connecticut, for example, a minor under the age of majority can possess and drink alcoholic beverages provided they are accompanied by a parent or guardian.
  4. The same may be said for states such as Texas and Washington, among others.
  5. Other states, such as Michigan, do not make any exceptions, and those under the age of 21 are not permitted to consume or possess alcoholic beverages.
  6. According to the depiction, certain states – those shown in purple on the map – may not expressly prohibit underage alcohol drinking in their statutes.

To view the complete report and graphics, please visit this link.The disparity in sentiments between states demonstrates how widely differing people’s perspectives on the matter are.In the words of Ralph Blackman, president of the Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility: ″It’s one sign of how the states actually are distinct culturally.″ The organization strives to eliminate drunk driving and underage drinking while also promoting responsible consumption among those of legal drinking age in the community.Some states, such as California, have laws that appear to be at odds with one another.Minors are permitted to possess alcoholic beverages in private settings in that state, but it is unlawful for anyone to provide alcoholic beverages to a minor in any setting.

To further complicate matters, local governments can enact their own anti-underage drinking legislation of their own volition.According to Blackman, cities and counties will sometimes pass ordinances in response to a fatality or a local event that occurs in their jurisdiction.College towns, which have a higher concentration of young people living and congregating, may also enact their own rules.Parents may find it difficult to deal with a lack of consistency in their children’s behavior.

  • According to Blackman, ″we really shouldn’t be in the position of telling kids which laws are OK to break and which laws are not OK to break.″ With the variety of laws currently on the books, it begs the question: do stricter regulations result in less alcohol consumption?
  • Even though states with the most stringent laws had the lowest rates of underage drinking, the rates were not significantly different when compared to states that allowed exceptions, according to a HealthGrove analysis of the data.
  • Unsupervised underage drinking continues to be a significant problem in the United States.
  • More information can be found by clicking here.

Following the completion of the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, researchers examined alcohol consumption among young people ages 12 to 20.They discovered that nearly a quarter had reported drinking alcohol in the previous month, according to the survey results.

MINORS IN BARS

PARENTS; AGE OF MAJORITY; LIQUOR; Topic:PARENTS; AGE OF MAJORITY; LIQUOR; Location:AGE OF MAJORITY; LIQUOR

September 26, 2007 2007-R-0571
MINORS IN BARS
By: Daniel Duffy, Principal Analyst
  1. You inquired as to whether (1) minors are permitted to be present in barrooms where alcoholic beverages are offered and (2) if parents are permitted to serve alcoholic beverages to their minor children.
  2. A ″minor,″ as defined by the Liquor Control Act, is anybody under the age of 21 years.
  3. IN BARROOMS, THERE ARE MINORS In accordance with CGS 30-90, liquor permittees and their servants or agents are prohibited from permitting (1) minors to loiter on the premises where liquor is kept for sale or (2) minors, other than a minor over age 18 who is an employee or who is accompanied by his parent or guardian, to be in a room where alcohol is served at a bar.
  4. An opinion issued in 1915 in connection with a prosecution of a liquor licensee for permitting ladies to loiter in his establishment concluded that the term ″loiter″ is commonly used and meaning to delay, linger, be dilly-dally, and to waste time aimlessly (The State v.
  5. Tobin, 90 Conn.
  6. 58,62 (1915)).
  1. Violations are penalized by imprisonment for up to one year, a fine of up to $1,000, or a combination of the two (CGS 30-113).
  2. PARENTS WHO CARE FOR MINOR CHILDREN The sale, shipment, delivery, or gifting of alcoholic beverages to minors is typically prohibited under the law.
  3. According to CGS 30-86(b), the penalty is up to 18 months in jail, a fine of up to $1,500, or a combination of both.
  4. However, the restriction does not apply to, among other exceptions, delivery by a parent, guardian, or spouse of a minor if the parent, guardian, or spouse is at least 21 and the minor is in the company of the parent, guardian, or spouse at the time of delivery.
  5. DD:ts

Easter in Auckland: Everything you need to know about shop hours, closures and surcharges

  1. According to an earlier version of this post, New World Papakura, Orewa, and Whangaparaoa would be open on Easter Sunday.
  2. New World has now made the necessary changes to its website to reflect the company’s closure.
  3. Even while Easter is often associated with chocolate egg hunts and a long weekend, it can also be a labyrinth of ambiguous store hours, holiday surcharges, and no-alcohol days.
  4. When you throw in a lot of stressed-out Aucklanders, you’ve got a formula for disaster on your hands.
  5. Never be concerned.
  6. We’ve put up a comprehensive guide to everything you’ll need to know to make it through Easter in Auckland.
  1. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: * The Easter Bunny is expected to bring a mix of rain and sunshine this weekend.
  2. * Easter trading: Who has the authority to open and when?
  3. * Are you planning to travel this Easter?
  4. Everyone can find something to do for entertainment, whether at home and abroad.
  5. * Following 27 traffic fatalities over the Easter weekend, police are urging the public to exercise caution.
  6. SUPERMARKETS AND OTHER RESTAURANTS DISTRIBUTORS The retailers Countdown, New World, and Pak ‘n Save will be closed on Good Friday and Easter Sunday, as well as on Easter Monday.

Dairies and takeout, on the other hand, are permitted to remain open throughout the weekend.In the same way, eating establishments will charge you a 15 percent extra; however, be cautious because most will do so.Surcharges can now be applied on every day of the year, although it is usual practice for merchants to only apply them on public holidays in order to offset the expense of giving higher salaries to their employees on these days.STATIONS OF SERVICE Fortunately, you won’t have any trouble filling up before leaving for the holiday weekend because most gas stations will be open throughout the weekend.Some stations, on the other hand, have unusual restrictions that need you to seek a little harder than usual to find.

For example, all BP Connect stations in Auckland will be open all weekend, but BP To Go stations — which are independently owned and controlled – will be able to open if they so want on Saturday and Sunday.RETAIL Shopping malls — as well as the regular retailers within them, such as apparel, electronics, homeware, and sports shops – are required to close on Good Friday and Easter Sunday to accommodate religious holidays.There are a few bizarre exceptions to this rule, though.Duty-free shops, hairdressers, real estate brokers, and pharmacies can all continue to operate as usual if they so want.

  • Surprisingly, all of the businesses on Parnell Rd may be found to be closed.
  • Garden centers are subject to their own set of restrictions; for example, they are permitted to operate on Easter Sunday but not Good Friday.
  • WHY DOES IT CONFUSE ME SO MUCH?
  • All stores are required to close for three and a half days a year, on Christmas Day, Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and until 1pm on Anzac Day, according to state legislation.

To be clear, Easter Sunday is the only one of these days that is not observed as a national holiday.And therein lays the source of the misunderstanding.In 2016, the federal government delegated responsibility for Easter trade hours to local governments, which meant that local governments had the authority to decide whether or not stores may operate on Easter Sunday.

Prior to then, only stores with certain exclusions were permitted to conduct business.Auckland Council has decided to maintain the status quo, which means that most retailers, with the exception of those that provide needs, would remain closed.ALCOHOL On Good Friday and Easter Sunday, it is illegal to sell alcoholic beverages unless they are sold in conjunction with a meal.This implies that you can drink in a bar if you’re also eating, but you won’t be able to buy a six-pack from a liquor shop in this state.

Vineyards, on the other hand, are permitted to sell wine on Easter Sunday if the wine is produced on the premises.EVENTS Taking place at the ASB Showgrounds in Greenlane, Auckland, from April 18 to 22, the Royal Easter Show is completely free to attend.The Great SkyCity Easter Egg Hunt will take place on Saturday at 12 p.m.local time.Check out our whole list of suggestions for more inspiration.CONCLUDING COMMENTS The following businesses can continue to operate during limited trading days: – Dairies – Gas stations and convenience stores – Takeaway restaurant, café, and other similar establishments – Duty-free shopping malls – A store that provides services rather than selling items (for example, video shops or hairdressers).

  • – Real estate brokerage firms – Drugstores and pharmacies – Gardening supply stores (only Easter Sunday) – A store located at any public transportation terminal or station – A shop located at a location where an event or show is being held, such as marketplaces, craft exhibits, and stalls – A store that specializes on selling exclusively souvenirs.
  • These are the kind of businesses that are not permitted to open for business on Easter Sunday (and, more than likely, Good Friday): shopping malls, supermarkets, clothing stores, appliance and computer and electronics stores, homeware shops, and other simi

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