How Much Does The Post Office Pay?

The average United States Postal Service salary ranges from approximately $21,044 per year for Casual Clerk to $84,250 per year for Network Engineer. Average United States Postal Service hourly pay ranges from approximately $10.28 per hour for Casual Clerk to $25.17 per hour for Motor Transport Operator.
U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Jobs by Hourly Rate

Job Title Range Average
Job Title:United States Postal Worker (Carrier) Range:$17 – $26 Average:$19
City Carrier Assistant Range:$16 – $19 Average:$17
Postal Service Mail Carrier Range:$16 – $26 Average:$19
Mail Handler Range:$14 – $25 Average:$19

How much does the US Postal Service pay?

U.S. Postal Service (USPS) pays its employees an average of $61,469 a year. Salaries at U.S. Postal Service (USPS) range from an average of $41,731 to $91,313 a year. U.S. Postal Service (USPS) employees with the job title Labor Relations Specialist make the most with …Read more …

How much does the post office pay for retirement?

Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) To determine how much post office retirement is under CSRS, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management looks at the highest salary earned during any three consecutive years of service. Based on years of service, a postal worker earns 1.5 to 3.5 percent of their “high-3” average salary for each year.

How much does the post office pay under FERS?

FERS also uses the high-3 average, paying 1 to 1.1 percent of the high-3 average salary for each year of service. Under FERS, a postal worker with a high-3 average of around $60,000 and 20 years of service earns $1,007 a month without any deductions.

Is there a fee to pay bills with post office?

Post Office doesn’t charge for electronic payments (though some banks may charge – check with your bank if you’re not sure) but there might be a fee for some manual bill payments. If there’s going to be a fee, don’t worry – we’ll let you know before you make your payment.

How does the post office make money?

  • When Postal Service Losses Began. The Postal Service carried billion-dollar surpluses for many years before the Internet became widely available to Americans.
  • Postal Services Seeks Changes.
  • Postal Service Net Income/Loss By Year
  • USPS Announces 10-Year Plan to Save Itself.
  • What is the starting wage for a postal worker?

  • Administrative Assistance. How much should you be earning?
  • Installation&Maintenance
  • Customer Service
  • Management
  • Industrial Engineering
  • Sales
  • Software Development
  • Information Design&Documentation
  • Cleaning&Sanitation
  • Community&Social Service
  • Why does the US Postal Service lose money?

    – Politically, they have to keep far more post offices open than required by demand. – They made promises to their employees for retirement benefits based on the assumption that the volume of mail would keep growing. – The USPS is currently paying retirement benefits to the same number of former workers

    What is the average salary of a postal worker?

    Officials say she stole nearly $650,000 in checks while working as a clerk. A former Iowa postal clerk of the Dubuque Post Office stole over 60 pieces of mail with nearly $650,000 in checks, feds say, and names on checks were changed. Iowa postal clerk stole mail with $650,000 in checks: feds | Hilton Head Island Packet SECTIONSSkip to Content

    U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Jobs by Salary

    • The United States Postal Service (USPS) pays its employees an average annual salary of $62,493.
    • USPS employees earn salaries ranging from an average of $42,459 to $92,441 a year, depending on their level of experience and education.
    • Employees of the United States Postal Service (USPS) with the job title Labor Relations Specialist make the maximum money with…

    More information may be found here.There were no results found.Try a different search phrase or fill out our pay survey to receive a salary report tailored to your specific work title.

    U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Reviews

    Overall Customer Satisfaction Scores Learning and Development are two important aspects of any organization’s success.Organizational chaos, stress, and rapid change are all characteristics of this situation.Supervisor of Customer Service in Chicago, IL: Advantages include the employees and the benefits.When it comes to promotions, the buddy system is a disadvantage.

    Lack of communication, disregard for the opinions of others, and an excessive amount of effort.Extremely high levels of anxiety.In Pittsburgh, there is a postmaster named: Cons: In five years, I’ve gone from managing 15 employees in one building to 35 workers in five buildings, all without receiving a pay rise or bonus.

    Continue reading more reviews

    About U.S. Postal Service (USPS)

    Industries include the Postal Service. The United States Postal Service is also known as the United States Postal Service.

    Years of Experience

    This information is based on 571 replies to a survey.

    Popular Degrees

    Employees of the United States Postal Service (USPS) are paid in a variety of ways depending on their degree.

    Popular Locations for U.S. Postal Service (USPS)

    1. Washington, District of Columbia
    2. Chicago, Illinois
    3. New York, New York
    4. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    5. Los Angeles, California
    6. Atlanta, Georgia
    7. Houston, Texas
    8. Miami, Florida
    9. Denver, Colorado
    10. Minneapolis, Minnesota
    11. and Washington, District of Columbia.

    U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Job Listings

    Related Companies

    Rank and compare salaries for employees at companies in the same industry as U.S. Postal Service (USPS).

    How Much Do Postal Workers Get Paid When They Retire?

    Many postal workers work for the United States Postal Service for the entirety of their careers.As a postal employee, you’ll have access to several USPS benefits, including the federally mandated uniform retirement plan.The amount of money a postal worker receives in USPS retirement is determined by whatever retirement plan he or she is enrolled in and how long he or she has worked for the USPS.Although the United States Postal Service automatically retires at the age of 65, there are retirement schemes in existence under the Civil Service Retirement System and the Federal Employment Retirement System that have an impact on salary.

    In order to receive their monthly payout, those who retire under the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority must first complete specific eligibility requirements.

    Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS)

    The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) is available to postal personnel who began their careers before 1984.Employees who participate in the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) contribute 7 to 8 percent of their monthly income to the retirement system, which helps to defray the cost of their eventual pensions.They do not, however, contribute to Social Security retirement benefits since they are not eligible for Social Security payments under the CSRS.The U.S.

    Office of Personnel Management calculates how much post office retirement is owed under the Civil Employment Retirement System (CSRS) based on the highest income earned during any three consecutive years of service.A postal worker gets 1.5 to 3.5 percent of their ″high-3″ average wage for each year of service, depending on the number of years of service.The highest permissible yearly pension cannot be more than 80 percent of the high-3 average, which is typically the case for people who retire after around 42 years of service in the military.

    Compensation may be raised if the postal worker made voluntary contributions while working or has any accrued but unutilized sick time left behind.It is possible that cost-of-living adjustments may be made to the annuity, which would result in greater payments.Contributions to survivor’s benefits or a health benefit plan reduce the amount of money paid out.To give an example of a USPS retirement under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), use a postal worker with a high-3 average of around $60,000 and 20 years of service who earns $1,824 per month without deductions.This amounts to almost $22,000 each year.A worker earning the same wage and having 40 years of experience makes $3,837 each month, or almost $46,000 per year.

    Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS)

    After 1984, every postal employee employed after that date is eligible for USPS retirement under the Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS).Despite the fact that FERS pays less than CSRS, postal workers are eligible for Social Security and Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) benefits.Every pay month, postal workers make contributions to the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) and Social Security.The United States Postal Service (USPS) and the employee both make tax-deferred payments to the TSP.

    The Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) likewise utilizes the high-3 average, with each year of service worth 1 to 1.1 percent of the high-3 average wage.Under the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS), a postal worker with a high-3 average of roughly $60,000 and 20 years of service gets $1,007 per month, net of deductions.This amounts to around $12,000 each year.

    Using the same wage and 40 years of service, a worker receives $2,013 each month, or almost $24,000 per year in earnings.Due to the fact that FERS employees get Social Security benefits in addition to the distribution of their TSP payments, the true number is substantially greater.If you were employed under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), you can move to the Federal Employment Relations System (FERS).After then, the annuity is computed based on the number of years spent under each plan.

    Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA)

    • The United States Postal Service (USPS) engages in voluntary layoffs from time to time in order to minimize their staff. People who choose to retire under the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) will be able to collect their full retirement benefits sooner than they would otherwise be able to. A postal worker must satisfy the following qualifications in order to be eligible for VERA: Employed by the United States Postal Service for 31 days prior to receiving notification of the VERA
    • If you are over 50 and have at least 20 years of government experience, or if you are any age and have at least 25 years of government experience, you qualify.
    • Service in the civilian administration for a minimum of five years
    • A dismissal that is not the result of misbehavior or poor performance
    • and

    Payments are established based on whether the employee is covered by the CSRS or FERS plan, and payments begin on the first day of the month following retirement.

    Paying bills and topping up at Post Office and Payzone

      Fixed line, broadband and mobile top-ups Public transport tickets and tolls Lottery, gaming and digital vouchers plus icon minus icon chevron-right icon

    Prepaid energy top-ups

      If you’re concerned about rising energy prices, read our guide to keeping your energy usage and bills down. It includes links to other useful organisations who can help. You can easily top up your prepaid gas or electricity meter in Post Office branches or Payzone stores. We take payments on behalf of these providers: Prepaid top-ups using a gas card or electricity key Smart pay as you go meter top-ups Prepaid electricity using a Powercode (Northern Ireland only) When you’re ready to pay, simply: 1. Pop in with your prepaid gas card or electricity key. 2. Pay in cash (just tell them how much). 3. We’ll sort everything and give you a receipt for your payment. plus icon minus icon chevron-right icon

    Utility bills

      If you’re concerned about rising energy prices, read our guide to keeping your energy usage and bills down. It includes links to other useful organisations who can help. Need to pay your energy or water bill? We take payments on behalf of these providers at Post Office or Payzone locations. Just bring your bill or budget card and tell us how much you’d like to pay. We’ll take your cash or card payment and give you a receipt. We don’t charge for electronic payments but some banks may, so check if you’re unsure. There may be a fee for some manual payments. If so, we’ll let you know before you pay. alert icon plus icon minus icon check icon Pay bills from the majority of councils or housing associations over the counter at any Post Office or Payzone store nationwide. It’s this quick and easy: 1. Take your barcoded bill and payment to your nearest branch or store 2. Show your bill to the team there, who’ll scan it and take payment 3. You’ll get a receipt to confirm your payment and you’re done plus icon minus icon chevron-right icon

    Fixed line, broadband and mobile top-ups

      Mobile phone top-ups and e-vouchers plus icon minus icon chevron-right icon
    See also:  What Is Kingston Zip Code?

    Public transport tickets and tolls

    1. At Post Office branches, you may purchase National Express coach tickets or fill out paper applications for various modes of public transportation. Additionally, you may top up your travel cards, pre-purchase and collect train, tram, and bus tickets, as well as pay road tolls, at our Payzone locations. Tickets for public transportation and smart ticketing Applications for transportation paper minus symbol + icon for tolling on the Dartford and Mersey rivers Paying and playing are both straightforward processes. Tickets for the Health Lottery and the Lotto Social, as well as Neosurf coupons, may be purchased at your local Post Office or Payzone shop location. When you purchase Neosurf coupons in-store, you will receive credit that you may use to spend on your favorite gaming websites. You may also make deposits into your online gambling accounts for games such as The Health Lottery and Lotto Social. Additionally, you may purchase digital certificates for the following services and suppliers at Post Office branches: Adidas, Amazon, Apple, Google, Microsoft, Netflix, Nintendo, and Sony, among others. Spotify
      chevron-right icon check icon chevron-right icon question icon

    Why use Post Office and Payzone?

    We’re closer than you think

    Because more than 99 percent of UK residents live within three miles of a Post Office branch or Payzone shop, you’ll never have to go far to keep on top of your bills and financial obligations.

    Visit when it suits you

    We have a number of branches and businesses that are open during less busy periods, such as the early morning or late at night. Some businesses are open seven days a week, 365 days a year.

    Help others make payments

      If vulnerable friends or family can’t get out to pay themselves, you can help by topping up their card for them in our branches or stores. circle-outline icon chevron-right icon phone icon online-application icon

    U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Hourly Pay

    Base hourly rate on average (USD)

    U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Jobs by Hourly Rate

    The United States Postal Service (USPS) pays its employees an average hourly wage of $18.77.In the United States Postal Service (USPS), the average hourly wage is $15.82, with a range of $15.82 to $26.53 per hour.Employees of the United States Postal Service (USPS) with the job title Electronics Technician make the maximum money with an…More information may be found here.

    There were no results found.Try a different search phrase or fill out our pay survey to receive a salary report tailored to your specific work title.

    U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Reviews

    Overall Customer Satisfaction Scores Learning and Development are two important aspects of any organization’s success.Organizational chaos, stress, and rapid change are all characteristics of this situation.Supervisor of Customer Service in Chicago, IL: Advantages include the employees and the benefits.When it comes to promotions, the buddy system is a disadvantage.

    Lack of communication, disregard for the opinions of others, and an excessive amount of effort.Extremely high levels of anxiety.In Pittsburgh, there is a postmaster named: Cons: In five years, I’ve gone from managing 15 employees in one building to 35 workers in five buildings, all without receiving a pay rise or bonus.

    Continue reading more reviews

    About U.S. Postal Service (USPS)

    Industries include the Postal Service. The United States Postal Service is also known as the United States Postal Service.

    Years of Experience

    The information in this report is based on 711 survey replies.

    Gender Breakdown

    Male Hourly Rate: $16 – $28 on average Female Hourly Rate: $15 – $25 on average

    Popular Locations for U.S. Postal Service (USPS)

    1. Washington, District of Columbia
    2. Chicago, Illinois
    3. New York, New York
    4. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    5. Los Angeles, California
    6. Atlanta, Georgia
    7. Houston, Texas
    8. Miami, Florida
    9. Denver, Colorado
    10. Minneapolis, Minnesota
    11. and Washington, District of Columbia.

    U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Job Listings

    Related Companies

    Hourly wage rates for companies in the same industry as U.S. Postal Service (USPS) are shown below.

    Compare Employers

    Work satisfaction, stress, and gender at the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) are compared to similar companies in the United States. The United States Postal Service (USPS)

    USPS Salary: How Much Do Postal Workers Make?

    • It is an autonomous government entity, although it is tied to the executive branch of the United States government through the United States Postal Service (USPS). The United States Postal Service (USPS) has the distinction of being one of the few government agencies that derives its authority to operate directly from the United States Constitution. As a result, employees of the United States Postal Service (commonly known as postal workers) are deemed to be federal employees under the law. Because of budget constraints, the federal government has not provided subsidies to the United States Postal Service since the early 1970s, notwithstanding its historical support. The United States Postal Service (USPS) today produces its own money through its mail carrier and retail operations. The United States Postal Service employs postal workers on a temporary or permanent basis, as well as part-time and full-time. The compensation of a postal worker is determined by their specific role, their level of experience, and their educational background. The story that follows provides an overview of the prospective pay associated with the various positions available at the United States Postal Service. Keep in mind that a postal worker’s indoor job responsibilities include those of a service clerk, a mail processer, a mail sorter, a mail processing machine operator, and other related positions.
    • The mail carrier for the United States Postal Service is perhaps the postal worker most of us see on a regular basis. A total of more than 342,000 postal carriers were employed by the United States Postal Service during the calendar year 2018. A postal carrier with the United States Postal Service is responsible for the following tasks: Assigned administrative tasks
    • the proper loading of mail/parcels onto a United States Postal Service delivery vehicle or van.
    • Regular mail, Express Mail, and packages are all delivered on time and accurately.
    • The completion of the mail carrier’s allotted route
    • the completion of the mail carrier’s assigned route

    Neither rain, nor snow, nor the blackness of night prohibits us from delivering deliveries, according to the USPS ethos.Almost always, it is the United States Mail Carrier who completes the labor necessary to achieve the Postal Service’s motto of service excellence.If you want to work as a postal worker, you must pass one of two postal examinations.The United States Postal Service (USPS) administers two exams: the Postal Exam 473 and the Postal Exam 460.

    The most significant distinction between the two exams is that the 460 Exam is tailored exclusively for rural postal workers and rural mail carriers.It should be noted, however, that the substance of both the 473 test and the 460 exam is quite similar to one another.

    The USPS 473 Exam

    For persons seeking employment as a postal clerk, a processing clerk, or a mail carrier, the United States Postal Service offers the Postal 473 (and 473(e)) examination, which is administered by the National Testing Center. To guarantee that they have the highest chance of passing the exam on their first try, potential test takers should prepare for the exam as much as they can.

    473 Exam Format

    • Each section of the 473 Exam is divided into four sections. These sections of the exam are described in further detail below – Part A of the test is concerned with the ability of the test takers to check and compare addresses properly.
    • Part B of the test is intended to evaluate the ability of the test-taker to complete forms correctly.
    • Part C is divided into two sections: Coding and Memory. Part D is concerned with the test-previous taker’s work experience.

    Test-free Guide.com’s postal practice examinations are a great way to get ready for the exam.

    460 Exam Format

    • The Postal 460 test is administered by the United States Postal Service to applicants who wish to work as a rural postal clerk, a rural processing clerk, or a rural mail carrier in rural areas. Each of the four sections of the 460 Exam is worth one point. These sections of the exam are described in further detail below – Part A of the test is concerned with the ability of the test takers to check and compare addresses properly.
    • It is intended to evaluate the capacity of the test taker to memorize addresses in Part B.
    • Part C is divided into two sections: the first assesses number series, and the second evaluates number sequences.
    • Part D of the test assesses the ability of the test-taker to follow spoken instructions.

    How Much Do Postal Workers Make?

    • More than 12 million postal workers were employed in the United States during the calendar year 2018, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) also provides the following wage information for USPS employees: The median annual salary for a postal worker is $58,760, which equates to $28.25 per hour on average. The wages from the following United States Postal Service occupations are included in the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ published data: Letter carriers, administrative posts, and upper management are all possibilities.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) for a Postal Service Mail Carrier Only 

    Mail carriers are the only postal employees for whom salary and earnings information is available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). During the calendar year 2018, the following are the wage statistics for postal carriers: The mean annual salary for mail carriers in 2018 was $51,780, which equates to $24.89 per hour, according to Payscale.

    USPS Salary Percentile Estimates 

    Those at the top of their game (i.e. those in the 90th percentile of all postal employees) make an annual pay of over $64,000 (equivalent to around $30.75 per hour) as Postal Workers. Contrary to this, new postal workers who begin with a salary of over $37,000 (about $18 per hour) should expect to earn in the bottom ten percent of all postal workers during their first year of employment.

    States with the Highest Postal Worker Salaries

    The following states provide the highest wages to mail carriers and postal clerks who work for the United States Postal Service:

    State  Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     Hawaii  $54,250  $26.08
     Arizona  $53,870  $25.90
     Washington, DC  $53,840  $25.88
     New Jersey  $53,750  $25.84
     California  $53,660  $25.80

    States with the Highest Post Office Mail Carrier, Sorters, Processors & Processing Machine Operators Salaries

    The following states have the highest incomes for postal workers who work as sorters, processors, or operators of processing machines: –

    State  Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     Delaware  $53,890  $25.91
     Vermont  $53,070  $25.51
     Washington, DC  $52,930  $25.45
     Idaho  $52,820  $24.40
     Connecticut   $51,580  $25.28

    Metropolitan Areas with the Highest Postal Worker Mail Carrier Salaries

    The following states provide the highest wages to mail carriers employed by the United States Postal Service:

    Metropolitan Area Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     San Jose-Santa Clara-Sunnyvale, CA  $55,120  $26.50
     San Francisco-Hayward-Oakland, CA  $54,880  $26.38
     Honolulu, HI  $54,870  $26.38
     Florence, SC  $54,110  $26.02
     Los Angeles-Long Beach, CA  $54,030  $25.98

    Metropolitan Areas with the Highest USPS Postal Clerk Salaries

    Following are the metropolitan regions where postal clerks employed by the United States Postal Service earn the highest salaries: –

    Metropolitan Area Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     Prescott, AZ  $56,400  $27.12
     El Centro, CA  $56,370  $27.10
     Athens-Clarke, GA  $55,730  $26.79
     Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX  $55,710  $26.78
     Hickory-Morganton, NC  $55,540  $26.70

    Metropolitan Areas with the Highest Postal Worker Mail Carrier, Sorters, Processors & Processing Machine Operators Salaries

    The following metropolitan regions have the highest incomes for Postal Workers who work for the United States Postal Service as sorters, processors, or processing machine operators, respectively.

    Metropolitan Area Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     Saginaw, MI  $56,910  $27.36
     Wausau, WI  $55,620  $26.74
     Beaumont – Port Arthur, TX  $55,430  $26.65
     Baton Rouge, LA  $55,230  $26.55
     New Haven, CT  $55,090  $26.48

    Postal Worker Salaries for Varying Jobs within the U.S. Post Office 

    As reported by glassdoor.com, the following data shows numerous typical positions that are accessible to people who have completed one of the United States Postal Service’s examinations: Among the positions listed below are those of City Carrier Assistant (CCA), Mail Processing Clerk (MPC), PSE Processing Clerk (PSE), and City Letter Carrier.

    The United States Postal Service’s Skilled Labor & Manufacturing Job Positions

    The USPS City Carrier Assistants (CCA) Jobs

    • Average Salary – $58,515 per year.
    • Range – $32,000 to $83,000.
    See also:  What Zip Code Is 310?

    The USPS City Carrier Assistants (CCA) Jobs – Hourly

    • Average Salary – $17 per hour.
    • Range – $16 to $21 per hour.

    The USPS City Letter Carriers – Hourly

    • Average Salary – $19 per hour.
    • Range – $16 to $21 per hour.

    The United States Postal Service’s Administrative Job Positions

    The USPS PSE Processing Clerk 

    • $17 per hour
    • range – $15 to $21 per hour for PSE Processing Clerk

    The USPS Mail Processing Clerk

    • $49,030 per year for a Mail Processing Clerk, with a salary range of $36,000 to $72,000.

    Postal Service Clerk Salaries in the States w/the Highest Employment Levels

    With relation to a Postal Service Clerk Salary, the following states have the greatest employment levels as of May 2018: –

    State Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     California  $53,660  $25.80
     New York  $51,420  $24.72
     Texas  $51,030  $25.53
     Pennsylvania  $50,390  $24.23
     Florida  $52,260  $25.13

    Postal Salaries in the States w/the Highest Employment Levels for, Sorters, Processors & Processing Machine Operators 

    As of May 2018, the following states have the greatest employment levels for postal workers who are employed as sorters, processors, or operators of processing machines: – California, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania

    State Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     California  $51,520  $24.77
     New York  $51,390  $24.71
     Texas  $52,430  $25.21
     Florida  $51,870  $24.94
     Illinois  $50,880  $24.46

    Salaries in the States w/the Highest Employment Levels for Mail Carriers

    Since the beginning of May 2018, the following states have had the highest employment levels for Postal Workers: Mail/Letter Carriers (save for Alaska and Hawaii).

    State Yearly Wage (Median)  Hourly Wage (Median) 
     California  $53,680  $25.81
     New York  $51,620  $24.82
     Texas  $52,150  $25.07
     Florida  $52,090  $25.05
     Illinois  $52,090  $25.04

    USPS Salary Tables

    A large number of USPS employees are represented by a labor union. Current and retired USPS employees working in the Clerk, Maintenance, Motor Vehicle Services, or Support Services divisions are represented by the American Postal Workers Union (APWU). According to the American Public Works Union, their members are compensated according to the pay scale outlined below.

    USPS Full-Time Basic Pay Scale (APWU Members)

    Pay Grade  Starting Pay Step Ending Pay Step
     3  $15.02  $27.70
     4  $15.67  $28.16
     5  $18.85  $28.66
     6  $19.95  $29.20
     7  $21.05  $29.80
     8  $21.41  $30.43
     9  $27.41  $31.46
    10  $29.08  $33.89
    11  $29.70  $34.80

    USPS Starting Pay

    A postal worker’s beginning wage is determined by the American Postal Workers Union (APWU) and is $30,000 per year, or $15.00 per hour (according to the union).

    USPS Salary Summary

    • There are a variety of factors that influence the amount of money that postal workers earn, including: Experience, Job Type, Location, and Union Membership are all important considerations.
    • In general, the following observations may be made regarding United States Postal Service salaries: The starting salary for the United States Postal Service is around $30,000 per year.
    • The average pay for postal workers is from $52,000 to $58,000 per year
    • the highest post office salary is around $70,000 per year.

    Pay Information

    It is possible to make the following generalizations concerning USPS compensation: Approximately $30,000 per year is the starting salary at the USPS.
    Average annual pay for postal workers is from $52,000 to $58,000; the highest post office salary is around $70,000.

    Promotion Charts

    (This page was last updated on November 1, 2013) These tables provide answers to the question: What pay step in the promoted grade will I receive if I am promoted?One chart depicts the section of the pay schedule that applies to workers who were employed before May 23, 2011, while the other chart depicts the remainder of the pay schedule.After May 22, 2011, the portion of the schedule that pertains to workers employed after that date is covered by the second chart.These charts are up to date, accurate, and have been encoded into the payroll systems of the United States Postal Service.

    The charts in the ELM and other locations are out of current and are no longer in use.How to Make Use of This Graph: 1.Locate the grade and step from which the employee is being promoted in the colored ‘From Grade’ areas.

    1.Locate and select the grade to which the employee is being promoted in the colored ‘To Grade’ column directly below the part specified above in step 2.3.Move over to the right from the grade to which the employee was promoted, and down from the step from which the employee was promoted, and assign the intersecting step to the employee.For example, if an employee gets promoted from grade 4, step H in schedule-2 to grade 6, step H in schedule-2, go to the section labeled ″From Grade 4″ and cross over to step H.After there, proceed down to grade 6 in the light colored part and across the road until you reach the crossroads at step H.

    Assign step H as the step to which the promotion will be applied.

    Money Orders

    When sending money over the mail, money orders are a safer alternative to cash and personal checks than cash and personal checks.Money orders from the United States Postal Service® are inexpensive, widely recognized, and never expire.Your money order receipt will assist you in tracking down your payment and will serve as evidence of its value in the event that the money order is lost, stolen, or destroyed.Postal money orders are available for purchase and cashing at any Post OfficeTM store.

    Money Orders Can Be Sent Around the World

    1. Make a decision on the amount of the money order. It is possible to send up to $1,000 in a single order to any location in the United States.
    2. Visit any of the Post Office locations.
    3. Bring cash, a debit card, or a traveler’s check in case of emergency. You will not be able to pay with a credit card.
    4. Fill out the money order with the help of a store salesperson at the counter.
    5. Pay the amount equal to the face value of the money order plus the cost for issuing it.
    6. Keep your receipt in case you need to hunt down the money order.

    Standardized Money Order Practices and Procedures (DMM 509.3) Fees are calculated based on the monetary amount of the money order.

    Dollar Amount Fee
    $0.01 to $500.00 $1.45
    $500.01 to $1,000.00 $1.95
    Postal Military Money Orders (issued by military facilities) $0.50
    • Before accepting a money order, double-check that it is legitimate. When attempting to identify a forged money order, there are numerous crucial characteristics to look for. Genuine United States Postal Service money orders are distinguished by distinctive markings and patterns that help to avoid fraud. If you hold the money order up to the light, you should be able to see the following: Ben Franklin’s watermarks on the left side of the page repeat from top to bottom (circle 1 on picture)
    • An in-and-out weaving of a vertical, multicolored thread with the letters ″USPS″ weaves in and out of the paper on the right side of the Franklin watermark (circle 2 on picture)
    • If the dollar amount is discolored, it is possible that it has been erased, which would indicate fraud (circle 3 on the image)
    • Please double-check that the dollar amount is imprinted twice (circle 4 on the image).
    • Check to see whether the money amount is excessive
    • Money orders sent within the United States cannot be worth more than $1,000.
    • In the United States, international money orders cannot exceed $700 ($500 for El Salvador and Guyana).
    • If you suspect fraud, call the U.S. Postal Inspection Service at 1-877-876-2455
    • if you believe you’ve been given a fake money order, call the Money Order Verification System at 1-866-459-7822
    • and if you believe you’ve been given a fake money order, call the Money Order Verification System at 1-866-459-7822.

    Domestic money orders are non-expiring and do not accumulate interest while in transit.Money orders are cashed for the precise amount that is specified on the receipt.A money order from the United States Postal Service can be cashed at any Post Office for free.You may also cash them in at the majority of banks and select retail establishments.

    If they have enough cash on hand, rural couriers may be able to cash money orders.

    1. Do not sign the money order
    2. instead, write your name on it.
    3. Take the money order and a primary picture identification to any Post Office location.
    4. The money order must be signed at the counter in the presence of a store worker.
    • See the extra requirements for money orders made out to organizations, to more than one person, and to children for more information. Money Orders are accepted for cashing (DMM 509.3.3) At any time, you may check the status of a money order you’ve purchased from the U.S. Postal Service by logging into the Money Orders Application on the USPS website. Before you begin, double-check that you have the essential details for the postal money order you wish to examine: Serial number, Post Office number, and dollar amount are all required.
    • Payment on postal money orders cannot be stopped, however a money order that has been lost or stolen can be replaced. It may take up to 30 days to determine whether a money order has been lost or stolen.
    • It might take up to 60 days to determine whether a money order has been misplaced or stolen.
    • There is a $6.95 processing fee for replacing a money order that has been lost or stolen.
    1. Take your money order receipt to any U.S. Postal Service outlet
    2. and
    3. To begin a Money Order Inquiry, speak with a shop employee at the counter.
    4. You will be able to monitor the status of your money order and the progress of your inquiry by logging into the Money Orders Application once you have started the investigation.
    5. When it is determined that your money order has been lost or stolen, we will give you a new money order.

    Money orders that are faulty or damaged will be replaced by us.Make a trip to your local Post Office with the damaged money order and your receipt in order to acquire a replacement money order.The Postal ServiceTM will no longer sell or cash international postal money orders headed for Japan as of March 2020, nor will the Postal ServiceTM cash international postal money orders issued by the Japan Post.If you have not yet cashed a money order issued by Japan Post, please return the money order to the sender.

    On July 10, 2020, Japan Post announced that it will no longer accept international postal money orders issued by the Postal Service for payment.(On December 31, 2019, Japan Post discontinued the sale of international postal money orders meant for the United States.)

    Is USPS Losing Money Because of a 2006 Pension Law?

    As a result of a 2006 rule demanding that the United States Postal Service (USPS) finance its pensions 75 years in advance, the USPS is incurring financial losses. Like this fact-checking exercise?

    Reporting

    Advertisements In a post published on April 8th, 2019, the Facebook page ″The Other 98 percent″ claimed that the United States Postal Service had been misled into believing that it was losing money because of online retailers like Amazon, when in fact the shortfall was caused by a 2006 law mandating that the USPS pre-fund worker pensions: read: WHAT IF I TOLD YOU?Amazon is not causing a financial loss for the United States Postal Service.Due to a rule imposed by the Republican-led Congress in 2006 requiring it to prepay its pensions for 75 years, something no other firm does, the company is losing money.This was intended to bankrupt the company in order for its operations to be privatized for profit.

    The United States Postal Service would be profitable if this law did not exist.There was nothing complicated about their allegations, which appeared to have been based on tweets issued by President Donald Trump on April 2 and 3, 2019.In those tweets, Trump claimed that the United States Postal Service (USPS) was losing money because of the alleged high expenses of doing business with Amazon: The meme seen above began to circulate shortly after that, albeit its originator was unknown at the time.

    It opens by stating that the United States Postal Service (USPS) is not losing money as a result of Amazon, but that the relationship between the two organizations continues to be complicated.An article published in the Postal Times in April 2017 looked at the impact Amazon’s volume and logistics have on the United States Postal Service: Back in 2013 and 2014, the cooperation between the United States Postal Service and Amazon.com grabbed news as a potential lifeline for the postal service’s ailing finances.Prime membership rates were skyrocketing, with the primary advantage being free two-day delivery, and someone had to be in charge of delivering these items on time and effectively.With its daily neighborhood canvassing, the United States Postal Service (USPS) was an obvious ally, and the postal service even declared that it will make some Sunday deliveries for the first time in history, which is sure to satisfy its new convenience-focused buddy.In August 2016, the USPS issued a gloomy statistic: package sales would have to climb by 260 percent in order to make up for the loss of first-class profits.Fast forward to today.

    Despite the fact that package deliveries were more common than ever, their revenues were still insignificant when compared to the earnings from first-class mail.First-class income, on the other hand, is surging ahead by a landslide.Furthermore, the cost of shipping items is much higher.

    At the time of Trump’s April 2018 tweets, the United States Postal Service’s most recent fiscal year report stated that revenues had decreased by $1.8 billion from the preceding fiscal year.In the meantime, according to a 2018 report from the United States Postal Service, income increased by a billion dollars.As was the case in 2017, the United States Postal Service reported that it was unable to satisfy an obligation placed on it pertaining to pension funding: It was once again unable to meet its obligations to the federal government, which totaled $6.9 billion, at the end of fiscal year 2018 to pre-fund pension and health benefits for postal retirees, without jeopardizing the organization’s ability to fulfill its primary mission, as it had done in the previous several years.Mr.Corbett, Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President, stated, ″We made the difficult decision to prioritize the maintenance of adequate liquidity in order to ensure the continued achievement of the Postal Service’s primary mission of providing universal postal services to the American people.″ In the absence of making the pre-funding contributions, the Postal Service would have been left with inadequate money to assure the continuous fulfillment of its objective.

    1. In recent years, the claim that the United States Postal Service (USPS) is required to fund its pensions for 75 years in advance has gained widespread attention on the internet and in articles dating back several years, primarily in connection with mentions of the 2006 Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act, or PAEA.
    2. The United States Postal Service (USPS) has long contended that the PAEA’s pension pre-funding requirements ″add substantially to postal losses.″ The following section of PAEA appears to be the most relevant: The Postal Service is required, beginning in 2007, to compute the net present value of future payments required and attributable to the service of Postal Service employees during the most recently ended fiscal year, as well as a schedule of annual installments that provides for the liquidation of any liability or surplus by the end of the fiscal year in question.
    3. Directs the Postal Service to make annual payments into the aforementioned Fund in the amount of the net present value and the annual installment required under the amortization schedule, as applicable.
    4. The PRC will now have the authority to assess actuarial estimations made by the Office of Personnel Management.

    A correction to that often repeated allegation was provided in a Bloomberg story published on April 4, 2018, which can be seen here: Then there’s the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006 (PAEA), which some have dubbed ″the most ridiculous piece of legislation″ ever approved by the United States Congress.It is required by law that the Postal Service, which does not receive any government subsidies, prefund the health benefits of its retirees until the year 2056.A cost of $5 billion every year is incurred, and it is a demand that no other institution, commercial or governmental, is required to fulfill.

    Whatever you want to call it, if it doesn’t satisfy the definition of insane, I don’t know what does.The Post Office actually makes a profit when this responsibility is not in place.This has been referred to as a ″fabricated crisis.″ The fact that many businesses gain from a burden that makes the USPS less competitive is particularly relevant, since these same businesses may also benefit from full privatization of the USPS, a goal that has been advocated by various conservative think tanks for years.(This item was updated on April 4 to remove an incorrect reference to a 75-year retiree benefit financing requirement that was included in the fifth paragraph.) A 2014 report by Bloomberg includes the following allegation about the 75-year pre-funding period: For the first time in its history, it compels the self-supporting United States Postal Service, which gets no public funds whatsoever, to completely cover its retiree health benefits for a period of 75 years.

    It also mandates that money be set away over a 10-year period at a pace of more than $5 billion each year for a total of $80 billion in total.In other words, the postal service is now responsible for paying for the future health care of retirees who have not yet been recruited and in some cases have not even been born.There is no other public or private enterprise in the country that is burdened with that type of financial strain.The next item, in turn, linked to a 2011 essay by Ralph Nader making the same assertion.It was referenced in a 2012 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, which clarified: ″As a result, in 2007, the United States Postal Service began prefunding its retiree health benefits, reducing its CSRS pension liabilities and suspending its yearly CSRS payment.″ The United States Postal Service stated in its 2007 Annual Report that such prefunding was a foresighted and responsible action that placed USPS in the vanguard of both the public and private sectors in providing future security for its employees, and that it boded well for the organization’s long-term financial stability, but it also acknowledged that the required payments would be a significant financial challenge in the immediate future.We testified in April 2007 that we had removed the United States Postal Service off our high-risk list, in part as a consequence of the financial gains seen by the Postal Service as a result of these congressional initiatives.

    The PAEA did not compel the United States Postal Service to prefund 75 years of retiree health benefits over a 10-year period, contrary to claims made by various employee organizations and other stakeholders.Instead, according to the OPM’s approach, such payments would be anticipated to satisfy the liabilities over a period of more than 50 years, from 2007 through 2056 and beyond, if they were made (with rolling 15-year amortization periods after 2041).The payments needed under PAEA, on the other hand, were notably ″frontloaded,″ with set payment amounts in the first ten years surpassing the amounts that would have been necessary under an actuarially established amortization plan utilizing a 50-year amortization schedule.

    Pre-funding lasted ″in excess of 50 years″ and was ″significantly ‘frontloaded,’″ giving the impression of a massive debt that was not related to immediate operating costs and ″exceeding what actuarially determined amounts would have been using a 50-year amortization schedule,″ according to the report.Although the Government Accountability Office (GAO) disputed the allegation that the obligation was for 75 years, it acknowledged that the payments were in excess of conventional criteria, regardless of whether or not they were excessively onerous.According to a 2012 New York Times story, the mandate resulted in huge overpayments in excess of regular operational costs, and that no other institution, public or private, had been taxed in the same way: In addition, roughly 100,000 of the post office’s 547,000 employees would be eligible for retirement benefits under the legislation.

    It would also allow the agency to investigate the possibility of eliminating Saturday deliveries if it is unable to reduce costs over the next two years, and it would free up the agency to pursue a wider variety of revenue streams, such as delivering beer and wine to stores, if necessary.In addition, the government would reclaim more than $11 billion in overpayments to one of its pension funds that it had made.One of the most significant provisions of the plan is that it would reorganize payments made by the agency into a health benefits fund for future retirees.As required by law, the agency must pay $5.5 billion yearly into the fund, which, according to the Postal Service, has resulted in an increase in debt of $20 billion to its financial sheet since 2007.The bill would reduce the amount of the prepayments and would allow the agency to spread them out over a period of 40 years instead of one.As the only federal organization that prepays its future retiree health liabilities, the Postal Service stands out among the others: The Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006, according to a meme uploaded on the Facebook page ″The Other 98 percent,″ forced the United States Postal Service into a ″manufactured crisis″ by compelling it to pre-fund its pensions 75 years in advance, according to the meme.

    In several instances, the figure of 75 years was quoted, and then corrected with the counterclaim that PAEA ″only″ required USPS to pre-fund pensions through 2056 — with an aggressive ten-year term at the beginning, or ″frontloading,″ at the commencement.In reality, the United States Postal Service (USPS) faced a slew of problems to its financial health, and the language of the statute did not specifically indicate a 75-year period.There was mention of large pre-payments for retiree benefits through 2056, which is a unique operating cost to the Postal Service that will continue until 2056.

    Without that one-of-a-kind mandate and the economic burden it imposes on the United States Postal Service, the company’s profitability would be seen quite differently in many areas.A 75-year requirement was not included in the wording of PAEA; nonetheless, the year 2056 was included, and big payments made to comply with the mandate would have a significant impact on the USPS’s ledgers in many circumstances.It was slightly inaccurate and oversimplified in the details, but the overall claims it made — that pre-funded pensions were in fact creating the appearance of greater distress for the United States Postal Service — were correct.

    Iowa postal worker cashed $62,000 in stolen checks after names were changed, feds say

    Several hundred thousand dollars in checks were stolen by a former postal employee when she was employed at an Iowa post office, according to authorities.She was sentenced to three years in federal prison.Amy Jurisic, formerly of Dubuque, was sentenced in the Northern District of Iowa after pleading guilty to mail theft in June, according to a press release.

    Jurisic was previously convicted in the Northern District of Iowa.It was while working as a postal clerk at the Dubuque Post Office that authorities believe the 38-year-old, who is now a resident of Carterville, Georgia, stole the mail.Jurisic is suspected of stealing more than 60 pieces of mail between June 2017 and at least October 2018.Jurisic was arrested in October 2018.According to the news release, the mail pieces contained cheques made payable to a Dubuque-based company that had been established.A request for comment from the media was not immediately returned by the defense counsel defending Jurisic.

    According to authorities, Jurisic planned to deliver the stolen checks to a person in Chicago as part of a ″check-cashing operation.″ In a statement, authorities stated, ″the operation would alter the identities on checks and attempt to deposit the checks into multiple bank accounts.″ Authorities estimate that around $62,000 of the almost $650,000 in stolen checks was placed into bank accounts.The other checks were not processed by the banks because they had been ″identified as fraudulent,″ according to the institutions.According to the press release, Jurisic was sentenced to pay $62,456.33 in compensation to the victims as part of her punishment.

    In addition, after serving her three-year sentence in jail, she will be subjected to three years of supervised release.Dubuque is located on the Mississippi River, on the eastern Iowa border, and is the state capital.Kaitlyn Alanis is a national real-time reporter for McClatchy News Service headquartered in Kansas.

    She graduated from Kansas State University with a degree in agricultural communications and journalism.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.