How To Retire From The Post Office?

Step 1 Calculate the average of your three highest-paid consecutive years. For most, this will be your last three years, but exceptions do exist, so look carefully through your salary information. Step 2 Multiply your three-year average by 1 percent for each year of service if you are retiring after less than 20 years.
If you leave with 5 or more years of service, you are eligible for a deferred retirement benefit at age 62 or later. If you leave with at least 5 years but less than 10 years of service, you’re eligible to apply for retirement at age 62.
How do I retire from the post office? While the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) makes all decisions regarding retirement entitlement, current employees are required to apply for retirement through the USPS Human Resources Shared Services (HRSSC). HRSSC can be reached by calling 877-477-3273, option 5.

Where can I find retirement information for postal service employees?

CSRS and FERS Handbook for Personnel and Payroll Offices, Chapter 40. The Postal Service ensures that retirement information and counseling are made available to Postal Service employees. Retirement annuity estimates are provided to all employees through the use of the National Retirement Counseling System (NARECS) as follows:

What is the retirement age for the United States postal service?

The standard age for retirement at the USPS is 65, and there are retirement plans placed under both Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS) and Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) depending on whether service life began before or after 1984.

How do I apply for disability retirement from the postal service?

The Postal Service’s Human Resources Shared Services Center (HRSSC) and Eagan Accounting Service Center (ASC) are responsible for helping employees complete the disability retirement application, collecting the applicants’ financial information, and submitting the application to OPM.

Are USPS retirement benefits the most substantial in the nation?

Many employees believe that USPS retirement benefits are some of the most substantial in the nation. Many, upon reaching retirement age, are shocked to learn they will be facing a 50% to 75% or more loss in income after retirement.

When I can retire from US Post Office?

You may receive benefits when you reach one of the following ages: If you retire at the MRA with at least 10, but less than 30 years of service, your benefit will be reduced by 5 percent a year for each year you are under 62, unless you have 20 years of service and your benefit starts when you reach age 60 or later.

What to do when postal employee dies?

when a retired letter carrier dies. The first step is to notify the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). This can be done by phone, online or in writing, and it is not necessary to have a death certificate to do so. To report the death of an annuitant to OPM, visit servicesonline.opm.gov and click on “Report an Annuitant Death.”

How do I contact my retirement office?

Retirement Services 888-767-6738 Healthcare & Insurance Federal Health Insurance 202-606-1234 Dental, Vision, Life and Long Term Care Insurance Contracts * This office does not have access to participant enrollment information. Please contact your HR or Retirement Services for more information about your account. 202-606-1413

Step 1

Calculate the average of your three highest-paid years across a three-year period of time. For the most part, this will be your final three years of employment, but there are some exceptions, so carefully review your pay information.

Step 2

If you are retiring after fewer than 20 years of service, double your three-year average by 1 percent for each additional year of service. As an example, if you worked for ten years and your three-year average salary was $30,000 each year, your FERS earnings will be ten percent (1 percent x ten years) of that salary, or $3,000 per year.

Step 3

  1. To calculate your three-year average, multiply it by 1.1 percent for each year of service.
  2. If you have worked for 20 years or more and are above the age of 62, double your three-year average by 1.1 percent for each year of service.
  3. As an example, if you are 64 years old and have worked for 20 years with a three-year high average salary of $30,000 per year, your yearly pension payout will be 22 percent of $30,000 per year (20 years x 1.1 percent).
  4. This equates to $6,600 each year.

Tip

For a few years, try to acquire a promotion in order to improve your retirement income payments. Joining the Postal Service at the age of 42 will allow you to complete your 20 years of service while still receiving full retirement benefits, which may be an attractive choice for those considering a midlife career shift.

Warning

Make certain that you calculate this benefit accurately because it comprises a significant portion of your financial future, and a mistake might cause your retirement planning to be derailed.

569 General Retirement Information

569.1 Retirement Counseling

569.11 Responsibility

The Postal Service guarantees that information and counseling on retirement are made accessible to Postal Service workers who work for the agency.

569.12 Retirement Annuity Estimates

All workers are given with retirement annuity estimates through the usage of the National Retirement Counseling System (NARECS), which is structured as follows:

  1. Within three years of an employee’s initial voluntary retirement eligibility date, which is determined by the payroll and personnel system, the employee may seek an early retirement.
  2. Every year, once the age and service qualifying requirements for voluntary retirement have been satisfied, the system will take over.
  3. ERetire, the self-service web-based application provided by the United States Postal Service
  4. Employers with limited internet access can get annuity estimates by calling the Human Resources Shared Service Center (HRSSC).
569.13 Group Retirement Information Programs
569.131 Nature of Group Programs
  1. Every fiscal year, the Postal Service ensures that at least one CSRS retirement information event is held at a local location.
  2. Sessions will be available to all workers, regardless of age, years of service, or the date on which they become eligible for voluntary retirement.
  3. Spouses and other interested individuals will be permitted to participate as well.
  4. These programs are delivered through a combination of media and facilitation, with the dates, times, and other specifics of the sessions being chosen by local service staff and volunteers.
  5. Participation is entirely optional and takes place outside of working hours.

In accordance with 569.14, group information programs are intended to be used in conjunction with individual therapy rather than as a substitute.

569.132 Group Program Content

At retirement information sessions, employees may learn about a variety of topics that may be relevant to their retirement planning. This will help them to make more informed decisions about their future retirement years.

569.14 Individual Retirement Counseling
569.141 Nature of Individual Counseling
  1. Individual retirement counseling from the Human Resources Shared Services Center can be requested by workers as part of the retirement process (HRSSC).
  2. A retirement consultant is available at the HRSSC who can give thorough information on retirement health benefits, life insurance, and other retirement–related benefit programs, as well as other services.
  3. In most cases, these therapy sessions are performed over the phone, however they may also incorporate the use of a computer and/or other electronic devices as necessary.
  4. The retirement expert may also refer the employee to other resources for information on certain issues, such as the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) or Social Security.
  5. Sessions are considered on-the-clock if the retirement specialist is accessible to give such counseling during the same tour that the employee is participating in.
569.142 Counseling Session Content

An annuity estimate is ordered by the retirement specialist prior to arranging the counseling session. The annuity estimate is based on the retirement effective date and type of retirement (optional, disabled, etc.) requested by the employee and is mailed to the employee’s registered address. During the retirement counseling appointment, the retirement consultant will discuss the following:

  1. The supervisor reviews the employee’s retirement application and ensures that all necessary paperwork have been signed and dated.
  2. Examines the employee’s annuity estimate and responds to any queries that the employee may have posed
  3. Provides clarification on the employee’s employment and leave status up to and including the day of retirement
  4. When further documentation, proofs, affidavits, or other evidence is required, it is identified.
  5. The verification of civilian and military service history, as well as the benefits of deposits and redeposits, if any, are performed.
  6. In addition to alternative fund annuities (AFA), health benefits, life insurance, terminal leave, Thrift Savings Accounts (TSAs), and flexible benefits are addressed in this chapter.
569.143 Advice to Employee

When giving retirement advise to employees, the retirement counselor reminds the employee of the following facts:

  1. Despite the fact that information is supplied on numerous provisions and possibilities under the retirement legislation, final decisions (with the exception of management–initiated disability retirement) are left to the discretion of the employee.
  2. Any estimate of annuity is provisional and subject to final decision by the Office of Personnel Management.

569.2 Retirement Forms

569.21 Guidelines for Processing Personnel Actions

Processing retirement forms in conjunction with personnel actions is covered in detail in Handbook EL–301, Guidelines for Processing Personnel Actions, which may be found here.

569.22 Requisitioning Forms

A adequate supply of retirement forms is planned to be maintained at all installations to fulfill the projected demand. Obtaining these forms from the area supply center is done in accordance with standard requisitioning processes.

569.3 Retirement Account Information

  1. The Eagan ASC is responsible for maintaining the official individual retirement records.
  2. Any questions about an employee’s retirement account (including the amount of retirement deductions) that cannot be answered locally are referred by management to the retirement division of the Eagan Administrative Services Center (ASC).
  3. All of the individual’s retirement records, which include service in any federal agency or prior postal service with a break in employment of at least four days, are on file with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

569.4 Information Source for Separated or Retired Employees

If you have a question about the amount of annuity to which a separated or retired employee is entitled, or about special benefits for survivors of employees or annuitants, you should contact the following people: BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENTPO BOX 45BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

569.5 Information Source for Employees

Any inquiries pertaining to administration, or any questions requiring interpretation of the Civil Service retirement legislation or regulations, are directed to the following departments: MGR COMPENSATIONEMPLOYEE RESOURCE MANAGEMENTUS POSTAL SERVICE SWWASHINGTON DC 20260–4213 475 L’ENFANT PLZ SWWASHINGTON DC 20260–4213

569.6 Federal Income Tax

569.61 Taxable Annuities
  1. According to the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the ″three–year rule″ is no longer in effect for any individual whose annuity starting date is on or after July 1, 1986.
  2. This regulation generally stated that annuities were tax–free for up to three years, provided that employee contributions were made, and that annuity payments were made.
  3. According to the Internal Revenue Code, annuities that become effective after July 1, 1986 are subject to the ″general rule.″ It is provided by this regulation, which states that each monthly annuity payment is divided into two parts: (1) the tax–free portion (which represents a return of employee payments), and (2) the taxable balance.
  4. Once the tax–free portion has been computed, it is a fixed monetary figure that stays in force until the annuitant has recouped all of the contributions made to the retirement fund, whichever occurs first.
  5. At that point, the full monthly annuity is subject to income tax.

A publication from the Internal Revenue Service, Publication 721, Comprehensive Tax Guide to Civil Service Retirement Benefits, describes how the federal tax regulations apply to CSRS annuities.

569.62 Federal Income Tax Withholding
  1. Federal income tax withholdings on CSRS annuities are required to be made unless the annuitant specifically requests that no tax be withheld.
  2. If an annuitant chooses not to have tax deducted from his or her benefits, he or she may be required to make estimated tax payments.
  3. As a general rule, the tax withheld or anticipated tax, or a combination of the two, must cover at least 90 percent of the annuitant’s total tax for the year, or 100 percent of the tax indicated on the annuitant’s previous year’s return, whichever is less.
  4. Form W–4PA, which is accessible through the Office of Personnel Management, allows annuitants to specify the amount they desire to have withheld.
569.63 Federal Income Tax Questions

Questions pertaining to any part of federal income taxation are directed to the District Director of Internal Revenue in the appropriate district.

569.7 Privacy Act Considerations

569.71 General

Individuals’ information can be found in their retirement records. As a result, they may only be handled and released in conformity with the Privacy Act and its implementing regulations.

569.72 OPM Records
  1. Records that are transmitted to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) become the property of the OPM.
  2. Consequently, retired personnel wishing to make particular requests for certain records should submit their inquiries to the following addresses: BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENTPO BOX 45BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
569.73 Postal Service Records
  1. The Postal Service may keep copies of an individual’s retirement records and related correspondence in one of two places: either in the personnel area as part of the privacy system entitled USPS 120.070, Personnel Records — General Personnel Folders (Official Personnel Folders and Records Related Thereto), or in the PDC as part of the privacy system entitled USPS 050.020, Finance Records — Payroll System.
  2. Employees who wish to seek access to or updates to these records should send their requests to the local Postal Service personnel office for processing, rather than the central office.

Retirement for Postal Workers: Everything you need to know

  • This is the plan that applies to all postal employees who began working before 1984 and who were hired before 1984. Because they are covered by the Civil Service Retirement System, postal employees contribute around 7-8 percent of their monthly paychecks to their retirement plans under the CSRS. In contrast to the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), they do not pay any social security retirements and do not qualify for social security benefits. The US OPM (Office of Personnel Management) determines the amount of the payment by looking at the highest wage received during any consecutive three years of employment in the United States of America (Similar to the FERS system). Based on the number of years of active service a worker has accrued, he or she gets around 1.5-3.5 percent of the average of the highest-paying three years of their employment history. The bar for the highest annuity authorized under the high-3 average is set at 80 percent, which applies to persons who have more than 40 years of service under their belts. Taking advantage of CSRS retirement may result in a high three of the average income of over $60,000, and after 20 years of service, that individual can receive almost $22,000 per year without any deductions, or approximately $1,824 per month in retirement income. A individual with 40 years of service will be entitled for a salary of nearly $46,000 per year or $3,837 per month if they remain with the company for the whole period. There is the possibility of an increase in this amount if the worker made contributions to any type of voluntary account while in service or has unused sick leave credits in their account. You can also make modifications to your annuity to account for inflation, which may result in bigger payouts in the future. Keep in mind that a postal worker who was employed under the CSRS can have their retirement plans converted to the FERS, but the inverse is not authorized in this situation. A voluntary layoff method is used by the USPS from time to time in order to reduce the amount of surplus staff that they may have. In the event that you choose to retire through this method (also known as the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority), you will be able to access your retirement assets significantly sooner than other postal employees. You must, however, satisfy the following requirements in order to be considered eligible: employed by the United States Postal Service for at least 31 days prior to the VERA’s notification
  • You must be at least 50 years old and have worked for the United States government for at least 20 years, or you can be of any age provided you have 25 years of federal service under your belt.
  • It is necessary to have at least five years of civilian government service under your belt.
  • Unjustified dismissal that is not the result of wrongdoing or poor performance
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Postal Service Disability Retirement Application Process

  1. Objective In the case of illness or accident that prevents an employee from finishing their usual career, disability retirement is an employee benefit that is available.
  2. Employees must achieve specific legislative, regulatory, and administrative requirements in order to be eligible for retirement disability benefits.
  3. The purpose of our audit was to determine the efficiency with which the Postal Service processed disability retirement applications.
  4. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) manages disability retirements for the United States Postal Service and the federal government, which includes reviewing and granting or refusing disability retirement requests.
  5. The Human Resources Shared Services Center (HRSSC) and Eagan Accounting Service Center (ASC) of the United States Postal Service are responsible for assisting employees in completing the disability retirement application, collecting the applicants’ financial information, and submitting the application to the Office of Personnel Administration (OPM).

Employees of the United States Postal Service retired in large numbers in fiscal year 2017, accounting for over 25% of all federal agency retirees.Furthermore, almost 2,000 additional employees sought for disability retirement.What the Office of the Inspector General discovered The Postal Service is efficient in processing retirement disability applications and submitting them to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) in time to meet its informal timeliness goals; however, as of September 30, 2017, there were 1,195 employees who had been waiting for an application decision from OPM for more than six months at the time of writing.Three hundred and ninety-eight of those employees had been waiting for a decision for more than a year.In all, 398 applications were submitted by these employees, and we statistically sampled 94 of them.The Postal Service completed 95 percent (89 out of 94 instances) of disability retirement applications on time to fulfill their informal targets, according to the agency.

  1. Monthly meetings between Postal Service Human Resource Management and the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) are held to review a variety of human resources matters, including the progress of disability retirement applications.
  2. The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) does not always offer appropriate information on the progress of disability retirement applications, and it does not always notify the Postal Service of application decisions, according to Postal Service management.
  3. When disability retirement decisions are not made in a timely manner, the employee may suffer a number of negative consequences, including a loss of income as well as the loss of health and life insurance coverage.

Our research revealed that 20 employees had been on leave without pay for more than a year at the time of the application evaluation, during which time their health and life insurance coverage had lapsed.The Postal Service is also prohibited from hiring new employees to backfill jobs vacated by employees who are on leave without pay while awaiting the outcome of an application.What the Office of Inspector General Suggested Our recommendation is that management continue to work with the Office of Personnel Management to address disability retirement application delays, and that management escalate concerns to Office of Personnel Management oversight bodies, such as Congress, the Government Accountability Office, and the Office of Inspector General.Read the entire report.

What is the USPS pension plan?

After 1984, every postal employee employed after that date is eligible for USPS retirement under the Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS). Despite the fact that FERS pays less than CSRS, postal workers are eligible for Social Security and Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) benefits. … After then, the annuity is computed based on the number of years spent under each plan.

How long do you have to work for USPS to get a pension?

A federal or postal employee is now able to retire if they satisfy one of the seven conditions listed below. They include: 1.) They are insured by the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS), are at least 56 years old (the FERS minimum retirement age), and have at least 30 years of service. The 20th of March, 2011.

How much do retired postal workers pay for health insurance?

On average, the government pays 70% of premiums, however the United States Postal Service pays more for its employees who are covered under collective bargaining agreements with their unions. The total average increase was 4 percent, but participants had a greater portion of the burden due to restrictions on the government’s share of the cost.

What kind of benefits do postal workers get?

Postal career employees have access to a wide range of benefits, including the ability to accumulate annual and sick leave, the ability to donate leave, basic life insurance paid for by the Postal Service with additional options available at the employee’s expense, pretax health benefits with the majority of the cost covered by the Postal Service, pretax retirement benefits, and more.

Can I retire and collect Social Security at 55?

Without being handicapped, the earliest you may possibly take Social Security retirement benefits is at the age of 62….

What is the highest paying job in the post office?

Positions with the highest salaries in the United States Postal Service Title20162017 CHIEF HR OFFICER241,870.00257,220.00CHIEF HR OFFICER Executive Vice President General Counsel 241,870.00257,220.00DPMG/CHIEF GOV RELS254,874.00266,700.00EVP GENERAL COUNSEL250,335.00259,280.00DPMG/CHIEF GOV RELS254,874.00266,700.00EVP GENERAL COUNSEL241,870.00257,220.00

Will USPS offer buyouts in 2020?

VERAs are being offered to selected employees by the Agriculture Department and the United States Postal Service. However, as of yet, no buyouts are included. Furthermore, when early-outs are granted without a buyout, the track record shows that few people take advantage of the opportunity to leave early.

How many days a week do mail carriers work?

six days

What is the best job at the post office?

″Being a Rural Carrier is the finest job in the post office,″ says the carrier. Soup for the Federal Government’s Postal Employees

How much do postal employees pay for health insurance?

Following the completion of 26 complete pay periods of career employment with the Postal Service, employees are eligible to participate in the Flexible Spending Account (FSA) Program. It is possible to use the donations for health care expenditures up to $2,500 and/or dependent care expenses up to $5,000. The contributions are tax-exempt.

Do postal employees pay for health insurance?

Participation in the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program provides good coverage and flexibility, with the majority of the costs being covered by the Postal Service….. Since most employer premium payments are exempt from most federal and state taxes, health insurance may be made even more inexpensive for employees.

How do I retire from the post office?

Employees are obliged to apply for retirement through the United States Postal Service Human Resources Shared Services (USPS HRSS) even though the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) determines all decisions about retirement eligibility (HRSSC). HRSSC may be reached by dialing 877-477-3273, option 5, and following the instructions.

What is starting pay at USPS?

Starting Pay for the United States Postal Service An annual postal worker beginning salary of $30,000 is offered by the American Postal Workers Union. This equates to $15.00 per hour, according to the APWU.

Is Post Office a good job?

To be employed with the United States Postal Service is a rewarding experience. Generally speaking, the work is pleasurable; nonetheless, the workload may get overwhelming at times. It provides competitive compensation and benefits, as well as the possibility for promotion.

Retirement Benefit Questions

  • It initially published in the September/October 2020 edition of the American Postal Worker magazine. (This article first appeared in the September/October 2020 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine. What will happen to your federal retirement pension if you resign/separate from the United States Postal Service before you are eligible to retire is dependent on a number of things, the first of which is how much creditable federal service you have at the time of your departure. The credit for active duty military service can be applied toward retirement eligibility
  • however, federal workers must complete a minimum of five years of civilian federal employment that is covered by FERS retirement deductions in order to fulfill the minimum criteria for a FERS pension benefit. Leaving because of a handicap or under the provisions of a Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) does not apply in any of the circumstances listed below. You can also get a refund of your Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) payments if you have less than five years of creditable civilian service. If you resign or separate from the company after five years of service, your retirement benefit will be calculated based on the number of years of service you have when you leave and your age when you apply for the retirement benefit as follows: It is possible to qualify for a deferred retirement benefit if you leave with 5 or more years of service at the time of your retirement at the time of your retirement at age 62 or later. If you leave with at least 5 but less than 10 years of service, you may be able to apply for retirement at the time of your retirement. The benefit is calculated as 1 percent times your high-3 years average salary multiplied by the number of years and months of service
  • if you leave with 10 years but less than 30 years of service, you are eligible for a reduced retirement benefit when you reach your minimum retirement age (MRA, which is 55-57 years old depending on your year of birth), which is calculated the same as the above, with the exception that there is a 5 percent reduction for each year you are under the age of 62
  • if you leave with
  • For example, if you leave with 20 years of service but less than 30 years of service, you can prevent the 5 percent decrease for each year that passes by by waiting until you reach the age of 60 before applying for the retirement benefit.
  • If you leave with 30 years or more of service, you will be entitled for an unreduced retirement benefit when you reach your MRA (age 55-57)
  • but, if you leave with less than 30 years of service, you will be eligible for a reduced retirement benefit.
  • When you reach your MRA or later and you resign/separate before accruing enough service to qualify for an unreduced instant retirement, you may still be eligible for a retirement benefit in the following ways: If you’re at your MRA and have fewer than 10 years of service, you may be eligible for a postponed retirement at the age of 62, as previously indicated.
  • In the event that you are at your MRA with at least 10 years of service but less than 30 years of service, you are entitled for an immediate, reduced FERS retirement payment with the age penalty applied to your benefit. Similarly to the previous computation, you may be able to get credit for any unused sick leave balance.
  • It is possible to avoid the age reduction penalty if you are at your MRA with at least 10 years of service but less than 20 years of service. If you wait until you are 62 years old to file for your retirement benefit, the age reduction penalty will be erased.

Send an email to [email protected] if you have any questions about retirement.

Elections Matter

  1. It is our way of life, our present and past employers, our families, our health, and our future that are being attacked.
  2. We must all work together today to assist our fellow countrymen and women who are in need.
  3. Because we are labor and community activists, as well as people of goodwill who have worked long and hard to build this country, we must do everything in our power to ensure that Joe Biden, as well as the other candidates who support us and our issues, receive votes by mail or in person in the upcoming presidential election on November 6, 2016.
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Planning to retire

Information for NALC members planning to retire soon

  1. Employees are obliged to apply for retirement through the United States Postal Service Human Resources Shared Services (USPS HRSS) even though the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) determines all decisions about retirement eligibility (HRSSC).
  2. HRSSC may be reached by dialing 877-477-3273, option 5, and following the instructions.
  3. Preparing to submit your Employee ID and PIN when phoning HRSSC is highly recommended.
  4. Upon request, HRSSC will: Mail a personalized annuity estimate based on a projected retirement date supplied by the employee; Provide an annuity estimate based on a projected retirement date provided by the employee; Individual pre-retirement counseling should be scheduled and provided through telephone; Send a bundle of material (often referred to as the ‘blue book’) containing forms and guidelines.
  5. Employees who are near to retirement eligibility can also access HRSSC retirement services using the LiteBlue eRetire application, which is available on the HRSSC website.

Employees who wish to access eRetire must be aware of their Employee ID and USPS Pin numbers.The following features are available with the LiteBlue eRetire application: Individualized annuity estimates may be seen and printed.There are two options for requesting and receiving a retirement application packet: Please go here to download and print a retirement application packet.Order a retirement application package and have it delivered to your home.Make an appointment for a retirement counseling session.In addition to the information accessible from the USPS HRSSC, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) provides retirement information, and the NALC Retirement Department provides retirement information and guidance to its members.

  1. Retirement Department of the National Association of Letter Carriers distributes a brochure titled ″Preparing for Retirement,″ as well as Question & Answer booklets on retirement concerns for CSRS and FERS.
  2. More information may be found by clicking here.

Retirement counseling

  1. The Postal Service has a contractual obligation to provide letter carriers who are approaching retirement eligibility with personalized pre-retirement counseling if they so want.
  2. The goal of the counseling is to encourage workers to make fully informed decisions about their retirement.
  3. Individual retirement counseling is given by a retirement specialist at the United States Postal Service Human Resources Shared Services Center over the phone by the Postal Service (HRSSC).
  4. Letter carriers can request and arrange a counseling session by contacting Human Resources Services Center at 877-477-3273 option 5, or by logging into the Liteblue eRetire program online.
  5. Letter carriers have the right to get individual therapy at any time throughout the workday if they so want.

Whenever a letter carrier desires to undergo therapy at any time of day or night, local management must provide a reasonable amount of privacy.During the therapy session, the letter carrier has the right to have his or her spouse and/or an adviser present with him or her.In addition to assisting with the completion of paperwork (e.g., StandSF2801 and any other forms pertaining to FEGLI, FEHB, and TSP), the counseling will also include aid with military and civilian service deposit difficulties (for example, StandSF2801).If a letter carrier is unable to begin or finish a planned individual retirement counseling session, the matter will be handled at the local level by the union and management working together to resolve the situation.Individual and group retirement counseling are mandated to be provided by the United States Postal Service.That obligation stems from the law (the Civil Service Retirement Act and the Federal Employees Retirement Act), guidance from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM is the federal agency responsible for administering the CSRS and FERS), provisions of the USPS Employee and Labor Relations Manual (click here and here for the provisions), and national-level settlements with the National Association of Labor Confederations.

  1. Please call the NALC Retirement Department if you have any issues in receiving personalized retirement counseling.
  2. They would gladly help you.

Annuity Estimates

  1. The annuity estimate, which is a personalized computer-generated report, is issued twice a year to the home addresses of those workers who are currently eligible for retirement by the Human Resources Services and Support Center.
  2. Human Resources (HRSSC) can provide personalised annuity estimates to employees who are less than three years away from retirement eligibility.
  3. HRSSC.
  4. Employees who are less than 5 years away from retiring eligibility can examine and print personalized annuity estimates on-line at LiteBlue utilizing the eRetire tool, which is accessible through the LiteBlue website.
  5. Annuity estimates under the CSRS and FERS are provided by the NALC Retirement Department, which produces generic monthly charts displaying annuity estimates under both programs.

In this section

  • Materials Reference System (MRS)
  • Joint Statement on Violence
  • National Agreement on Contract Administration Manual (JCAM)
  • Contract Talk and NALC Activist
  • USPS Handbooks and Manuals
  • Materials Reference System (JCAM)
  • Joint Statement on Violence
  • ″Advanced Formal A and Beyond″ training program for the Contract Administration Unit, as well as the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).
  • Adjustments to the City Delivery Routes
  • difficulties with the workroom floor
  • CCA contractual concerns
  • and City Delivery resources are all addressed.
  • Employee Assistance Program for Safety and Health
  • Extreme weather conditions
  • Retirement Preparing to retire
  • already retired
  • maintaining membership while retired
  • retirement planning
  • Letter Carrier Political Fund for Retired Letter Carrier Workers
  • Publications that are useful
  • Injured on the job
  • Customer Connect

How Much Do Postal Workers Get Paid When They Retire?

  1. Many postal workers work for the United States Postal Service for the entirety of their careers.
  2. As a postal employee, you’ll have access to several USPS benefits, including the federally mandated uniform retirement plan.
  3. The amount of money a postal worker receives in USPS retirement is determined by whatever retirement plan he or she is enrolled in and how long he or she has worked for the USPS.
  4. Although the United States Postal Service automatically retires at the age of 65, there are retirement schemes in existence under the Civil Service Retirement System and the Federal Employment Retirement System that have an impact on salary.
  5. In order to receive their monthly payout, those who retire under the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority must first complete specific eligibility requirements.

Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS)

  1. The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) is available to postal personnel who began their careers before 1984.
  2. Employees who participate in the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) contribute 7 to 8 percent of their monthly income to the retirement system, which helps to defray the cost of their eventual pensions.
  3. They do not, however, contribute to Social Security retirement benefits since they are not eligible for Social Security payments under the CSRS.
  4. The U.S.
  5. Office of Personnel Management calculates how much post office retirement is owed under the Civil Employment Retirement System (CSRS) based on the highest income earned during any three consecutive years of service.

A postal worker gets 1.5 to 3.5 percent of their ″high-3″ average wage for each year of service, depending on the number of years of service.The highest permissible yearly pension cannot be more than 80 percent of the high-3 average, which is typically the case for people who retire after around 42 years of service in the military.Compensation may be raised if the postal worker made voluntary contributions while working or has any accrued but unutilized sick time left behind.It is possible that cost-of-living adjustments may be made to the annuity, which would result in greater payments.Contributions to survivor’s benefits or a health benefit plan reduce the amount of money paid out.To give an example of a USPS retirement under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), consider a postal worker with a high-3 average of approximately $60,000 and 20 years of service who earns $1,824 per month without deductions.

  1. This amounts to almost $22,000 each year.
  2. A worker earning the same wage and having 40 years of experience makes $3,837 each month, or almost $46,000 per year.

Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS)

  1. After 1984, every postal employee employed after that date is eligible for USPS retirement under the Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS).
  2. Despite the fact that FERS pays less than CSRS, postal workers are eligible for Social Security and Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) benefits.
  3. Every pay month, postal workers make contributions to the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) and Social Security.
  4. The United States Postal Service (USPS) and the employee both make tax-deferred payments to the TSP.
  5. The Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) likewise utilizes the high-3 average, with each year of service worth 1 to 1.1 percent of the high-3 average wage.

Under the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS), a postal worker with a high-3 average of roughly $60,000 and 20 years of service gets $1,007 per month, net of deductions.This amounts to around $12,000 each year.Using the same wage and 40 years of service, a worker receives $2,013 each month, or almost $24,000 per year in earnings.Due to the fact that FERS employees get Social Security benefits in addition to the distribution of their TSP payments, the true number is substantially greater.If you were employed under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), you can move to the Federal Employment Relations System (FERS).After then, the annuity is computed based on the number of years spent under each plan.

Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA)

  • The United States Postal Service (USPS) engages in voluntary layoffs from time to time in order to minimize their staff. People who choose to retire under the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) will be able to collect their full retirement benefits sooner than they would otherwise be able to. A postal worker must satisfy the following qualifications in order to be eligible for VERA: Employed by the United States Postal Service for 31 days prior to receiving notification of the VERA
  • If you are over 50 and have at least 20 years of government experience, or if you are any age and have at least 25 years of government experience, you qualify.
  • Service in the civilian administration for a minimum of five years
  • A dismissal that is not the result of misbehavior or poor performance
  • and

Payments are established based on whether the employee is covered by the CSRS or FERS plan, and payments begin on the first day of the month following retirement.

USPS early outs and you: Good deal, or return to sender?

The Postal Service’s early retirement offer has given feds in other agencies fresh (and, in many cases, false) optimism that they too might retire early on a lower pension with immediate effect.This is because many individuals believe that buyouts (referred to as VSIPs in government jargon) and VERAs (early retirement) are synonymous.However, this is not true in the case of the Postal Service, which is only giving the early retirement option to non-bargaining unit employees at headquarter, regional, and district offices until the end of April.The great majority of the Service’s 645,000 employees are represented by labor unions (of which the vast majority are also dues-paying members), and hence are not eligible for the early retirement.

Another possibility under the Biden administration and with Democratic control of Congress is that many if any other government operations would be downsized and will be forced to give buyouts or early retirement options to departing employees.While jobs in the private sector have been disappearing at an alarming rate as a result of the COVID-19 epidemic, the government has seen an increase in employment.As air travel continues to grow in popularity in the next months and years, the Transportation Security Administration is looking to hire up to 6,000 additional employees to keep up with the growing demand.Many additional organizations with responsibilities in the areas of health and safety will be expanding their workforce.

The Postal Service, on the other hand, is an exception.Since the Post Office Department was removed from the Cabinet and since it is a semi-government owned company, numerous politicians and private companies have pushed to curtail its ability to perform its functions and operate effectively.The objective was and continues to be to allow private enterprises to handle high-end, high-revenue goods, leaving the United States Postal Service with less lucrative options: The obligation to send a letter from Florida to Alaska for 55 cents (a non-profitable move) while allowing non-postal delivery corporations to take on more lucrative delivery alternatives, even occasionally utilizing the USPS to distribute their goods.During the Trump administration, the Postal Service came under fire for a controversy over voting by mail.There was a widespread belief that it had been ordered to self-destruct or make sluggish deliveries in order to ‘show’ it was unreliable.The bottom result is that whatever the future holds for the United States Postal Service, it is unlikely to have an impact on federal employees in other agencies—except when their mail is delayed as well.

Since they were initially implemented during the Clinton administration, many federal employees have fantasized of being bought out.During the Kennedy administrations, the President wished to decrease the size of the federal government to its pre-Kennedy levels.The solution was to provide buyouts in exchange for early retirement.Initially, buyouts were approved by the Department of Defense (mainly at naval shipyards) and were limited to a maximum value of $25,000 per employee.Later, VSiPS and VERAs were made available to additional government entities.

  • However, the maximum payout of $25,000 has remained intact, with the exception of the Defense Department, which can grant up to $40,000.
  • Also, agencies that offered early terminations without a buyout were rarely successful in attracting new clients.
  • Furthermore, after deductions, the $25,000 is reduced to $17,000 or $18,000 in the majority of situations.
  1. VERAs that do not need a financial payment might be beneficial in the selection of employees.
  2. They have the ability to allow qualified employees to retire years ahead of schedule on a reduced payout that is somewhat inflation protected.
  3. However, for anybody under the age of 62, those yearly cost of living adjustments do not begin until they reach the age of 62.
  4. A Federal Employees Retirement Scheme (FERS) employee could be able to retire in his or her 50s, but would not be eligible for COLA (cost of living adjustment) protection until age 62 under this system.
  1. Federal employees who are considering early retirement should make certain that they do not violate the 5-year requirement for health-care coverage before taking the plunge.
  2. Currently, government employees and retirees are eligible for anywhere between 20 and 40 different health plans and alternatives.
  3. They are free to modify their plans as much as they like throughout the year and are not subject to rejection for any reason.
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Employees and retirees both pay the same premiums for the same insurance plan.Furthermore, the federal government covers more than 70% of the average premium.Few private organizations provide such a benefit, such a wide range of alternatives, or, in many circumstances, any health insurance at all, as does the government.A financial planner in the Washington, D.C., region says she advises all of her federal customers to think twice before leaving the government early, especially if increased salary is the major motivation for doing so.In light of the TSP match, government health insurance alternatives, and benefits such as vacation time and holidays in government, ″I advise individuals they better receive A LOT more money″ before leaving their federal employment for another position.

Consequently, while the USPS offer is intriguing, it will have little influence on the vast majority of federal employees, much alone most postal workers.Consider this, though, for those who are still dreaming of retiring early with a buyout: There are occasions when the mathematics tell you that the only thing worse than retiring early with a buyout is retiring early with no buyout.

Nearly Useless Factoid

David Thornton contributed to this article. When Big Ben is running slowly, workmen will put an old coin to the pendulum in order to make it go faster. When one cent is added to the clock, it gains two-fifths of a second over the course of 24 hours. Reuters is the source of this information.

Do Postal Workers Get Social Security? 

Social Security is a retirement system that American workers contribute to throughout the course of their working lives.Individuals are eligible to obtain Social Security payments if they reach a particular age limit.Many older folks rely on these benefits to assist cover their living expenses and other everyday expenditures once they retire because they no longer have a regular wage coming in to supplement their income.Do postal workers, on the other hand, receive Social Security?

Postal workers are considered federal employees, and whether or not federal employees are eligible to collect Social Security benefits is determined by the length of time they spent working for the government.Some postal workers may be qualified for Social Security benefits, while others may be ineligible for any benefits at all.

Which Workers Are Eligible? 

Employees of the federal government, including postal employees, who were hired before 1983 were not required to pay social security taxes.Instead, these employees made contributions to the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), which provides a distinct set of benefits.The Social Security Administration does not provide payments to employees who chose to remain in the CSRS after 1983.Workers who left the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) and began paying Social Security taxes after 1983 may find that their CSRS pensions have an influence on their eligibility for Social Security benefits if they had less than 30 years of considerable earnings under Social Security.

Postal workers who are currently employed and those who were recruited after 1983 contribute to the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) and are eligible to receive Social Security benefits.

How Much Does a Postal Service Worker Make in Retirement?

The government retirement program offers pension payments as well as disability insurance to those who are qualified for it.It is dependent on the age of the postal worker and the length of time they have worked as a postal worker or government employee before retiring.A postal worker who retired in 2020 after 25 years of service would get a basic annuity of between $1,308 and $1,335, depending on his or her age.

How Many Years Do You Have to Work for the Post Office to Retire?

An employee of the federal government who wishes to be eligible for retirement annuities must have completed at least 5 years of creditable civilian service and 20 years of service. They must also be a particular age in order to be eligible for benefits, and this age is determined by the year in which they were born. These individuals are between the ages of 55 and 57.

What Benefits Do Postal Workers Get?

Postal workers are compensated handsomely for their efforts with a comprehensive benefits package.Compensation, health benefits, dental and vision insurance, flexible spending accounts, long-term care insurance, retirement, life insurance, commuter programs, professional development programs, vacation and sick leave, and ten paid holidays each year are all included in this category.Postal workers who have just been hired are eligible for Social Security and Medicare benefits.Other postal employees may be eligible for benefits as well, depending on when they were employed and which projects they have contributed to throughout the course of their careers with the company.

Can You Collect Social Security If You Never Worked?

Social Security is a scheme that employees must contribute to for a minimum of ten years.It is possible to obtain Social Security payments even if you have never worked if you are a family member of someone who did work and paid into the system and contributed to the system.Spouses, ex-spouses, children, and parents may also be eligible for spousal, survivor, or children’s benefits based on the history of earnings and Social Security tax payments made by the qualified worker throughout their marriage.

How Much Do Postal Workers Get Paid When They Retire?

The amount of annuity paid to postal workers is determined on their age and the number of years they have worked.Image courtesy of Comstock/Getty Images/Comstock/Getty Images As a result of the Postal Service’s severe financial situation, CBS News announced in June 2011 that the United States Postal Service was delaying pension plan payments to employees.Nonetheless, as of the time of publishing, retirees from the Postal Service were still eligible for all retirement plans, and postal workers were allowed to choose from a variety of different sources of retirement income.

The Civil Service Retirement System

The Civil Service Retirement System, sometimes known as the CSRS, is the government retirement income source for employees who began working at the United States Postal Service before 1984.Anyone who began working at the United States Postal Service after 1984 is presently covered by the Federal Employee Retirement System, also known as the FERS.The CSRS functions in a similar way to the FERS in that it is funded by employee contributions.The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) allows postal employees to make contributions of 7, 7 1/2, or 8 percent of their wages, with the post office matching their payments.

They are compelled to pay Medicare tax, but they are exempt from paying Social Security tax.

Federal Employee Retirement System

The Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS) is more well-known among post office employees who joined the system more recently.The Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) is divided into three parts: basic retirement payments, Social Security benefits, and a Thrift Savings Plan.Monthly, employees contribute their respective portions of their paychecks to the basic plan and Social Security, while the postal service contributes a sum equivalent to 1 percent of an employee’s basic salary to a Thrift Savings Plan on their behalf.Contributions to the Thrift Savings Plan, which will be matched by the United States Postal Service, are also permitted by employees.

After retirement, the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) pays a monthly annuity.

Calculating CSRS Annuity

Several approaches are available for calculating your future CSRS annuity.Determine your High-3 income, which is the highest average pay you received during a three-year period of post office service, and then multiply that sum by three.After five years of post office employment, you will get a basic CSRS annuity equal to 1.5 percent of your High-3 income, which is the maximum amount you may receive.This percentage drops to 1.75 percent after another five years.

After 10 years of service, the rate is 2 percent for all years of service.For a disability retirement annuity, the amount is 40 percent of your highest three-year earnings.Annuitants under the CSRS are eligible for an annuity equal to 80 percent of their High-3 salary plus sick leave credits.

Calculating FERS Annuity

In addition, your High-3 salary is taken into consideration when calculating your FERS annuity.It is 1 percent of your High-3 pay if you are under the age of 62, or if you are beyond the age of 62 but have fewer than 20 years of service with the post office.Figure 1.1 percent of your High-3 income if you are 62 years old or older and have 20 years or more of post office service behind you.Reducing 5/12 of 1 percent from your annuity each month if you retire before the age of 62 and have worked for the post office for 10 years or more.

If you have 30 years of post office service or 20 years of service when you retire at the age of 60, there are no reductions in your pension.Figure 1 percent of your High-3 compensation if you have 20 years of service with the post office, and 1.1 percent of your High-3 salary if you have more than 20 years of service with the post office for calculating a disability pension beyond age 62.

How long do you have to work for USPS to retire?

For the Postal Service, how many years do you have to work before you can retire? An employee of the federal government who wishes to be eligible for retirement annuities must have completed at least 5 years of creditable civilian service and 20 years of service.

Can you retire from USPS after 10 years?

According to the previous section, if you’re at your MRA with fewer than 10 years of service, you’re eligible for a postponed retirement at the age of 62. If you are at your MRA with at least 10 years but less than 20 years of service, you can avoid the age reduction penalty by waiting until you reach the age of 62 to apply for your retirement benefit and then applying it.

What is the average pension for a US postal worker?

To give an example of a USPS retirement under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), use a postal worker with a high-3 average of around $60,000 and 20 years of service who earns $1,824 per month without deductions. This amounts to almost $22,000 each year. A worker earning the same wage and having 40 years of experience makes $3,837 each month, or almost $46,000 per year.

Does USPS have a good retirement?

A defined benefit (pension) as well as disability coverage are provided through the federal retirement scheme, in which the Postal Service participates.Tax-deferred payments to the TSP are made by employees, and the Postal Service may make matching contributions (up to 5 percent of their wages) in exchange for their contributions.Articles on ThaJokes are based on information that we have gathered from various sources on the internet.When it comes to data collection, we rely on reputable sources.

The material provided on this website may be partial or erroneous, despite the ongoing care and attention we devote to its compilation.Is there anything in this article that you think is wrong or incomplete?Please notify us at [email protected] team at thajokes.com

Most frequently asked questions

How do I retire from the post office?

Employees are obliged to apply for retirement through the United States Postal Service Human Resources Shared Services (USPS HRSS) even though the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) determines all decisions about retirement eligibility (HRSSC). HRSSC may be reached by dialing 877-477-3273, option 5, and following the instructions.

Is the post office offering early retirement in 2021?

Employees of the United States Postal Service will now be able to retire at a younger age under the Postal Service Reform Act of 2021 (H.R. The United States Postal Service (USPS) said on Wednesday that it is providing early retirement to non-union employees as it consolidates postal districts in a bid to reduce billions of dollars in losses.

What is the average Social Security check?

The fact that they will most likely get a monthly stipend from the federal government will provide them with some measure of consolation. As of October 2021 (the most recent month for which data was available), the average Social Security check payout for retired employees was $1,562.66 per month, according to the Social Security Administration.

Do postal workers have good benefits?

Postal career employees have access to a wide range of benefits, including annual and sick leave that can be accumulated, the option to donate leave, basic life insurance that is paid for by the Postal Service with additional options available at the employee’s expense, and pretax health benefits, with the majority of the cost covered by the Postal Service before taxes.

Can postal workers get Social Security disability?

A minimum of 18 months of federal civilian duty and an application for Social Security disability payments are required in order to be considered eligible. You must have become incapacitated as a result of a sickness or accident that happened while you were working for the United States Postal Service. It must be anticipated that the handicap will persist at least one year.

How Many Years Does It Take To Retire From The Post Office?

Can I retire after 5 years of federal service?

At the age of 62, FERS personnel who have served for five years are entitled for a full (non-reduced) instant pension. Workers who have completed 5 years or more of federal service and are 62 years or older can resign and get a full pension. Those who pick this retirement option are the only ones who will receive a one percent increase in their retirement calculation.

Can you retire after 20 years of work?

After accumulating 20 years of creditable service, you are eligible to retire at whatever age you want. Even if you do not have 20 years of creditable service, you may be eligible for a service retirement benefit when you reach the age of 62.

What happens to my retirement if I quit the post office?

For those who leave the federal government with at least 20 years of experience, the full unreduced retirement is payable even if your application is postponed until you reach the age of 60, and your insurance benefits are eligible for reinstatement (as long as the five-year test was met prior to resignation).

Will the post office offer early retirement in 2020?

Voluntary Early Retirement (VERA) is a

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