How To Create A Package In Intellij?

In IntelliJ IDEA, here’s how you can create a package: Right-click on the source folder. Go to new and then package.
Create a new package

  1. In the Project tool window ( Alt+1 ), right-click the node within the Sources Root or Test Sources Root. in which you want to create a new package, and click New | Package.
  2. Name the new package and press Enter. Write package names in lowercase letters.

If the Welcome screen opens, click New Project. Otherwise, from the main menu, select File | New Project. In the New Project wizard, select Java from the list on the left. To develop Java applications in IntelliJ IDEA, you need the Java SDK (JDK).

How to mark a project as source folder in IntelliJ?

Keep in mind that I am using Intellij IDEA and not Oracle’s software. Oh, my bad. I confused it with Gradle project. You can mark any folder in project as Source folder with right click → Mark directory as → Sources root.

Java Package

  • A package is essentially a container that contains types that are connected to one another (Java classes, interfaces, enumerations, and annotations). For example, the ResultSet interface in core Java is part of the java.sql package, which is responsible for handling SQL queries. A collection of related types that are required for the SQL query and database connection are included in this package. In order to incorporate the ResultSet interface into your code, just include the java.sql package in your project’s dependencies (Importing packages will be discussed later in the article). As previously stated, packages are just containers for Java classes, interfaces, and other types of data. These packages assist you with reserving the class namespace and writing code that is easy to maintain. In Java, for example, there are two Date classes to choose from. The rule of thumb in Java programming, on the other hand, is that only one unique class name is permitted in a single Java project. It’s unclear how they managed to include two classes with the identical name Date in the Java Development Kit. This was made feasible by the fact that these two Date classes are contained within two distinct packages: java.util. A typical Date class that may be used anywhere
  • Date – this is a standard Date class that can be used wherever
  • Java.sql.Date – This is a SQL Date that is used for things like SQL queries and other things.

Packages are classified into two groups based on whether the package has been specified by the user or not:

Built-in Package

Known as built-in packages, these are pre-existing Java packages that are included with the JDK.For example, java.lang, java.util, java.io, and so on are all Java packages.As an illustration: import java.util.ArrayList; class ArrayListUtilization; public static void main(String args) ArrayList myList = new ArrayList(3); myList.add(3); myList.add(2); myList.add(1); System.out.println(myList); ArrayList myList = new ArrayList(3); myList.add(2); myList.add(1); System.out.println(myList); ArrayList myList = new myList = The ArrayList class is a member of the java.util package, as seen in the output.To make advantage of it, we must first import the package into our system using the import statement.import java.util.ArrayList from the source code

User-defined Package

Java also provides the ability to develop packages that meet your own requirements. User-defined packages are what these kind of packages are referred to as.

How to define a Java package?

The term package is used to declare a package in the Java programming language.Java packages are stored in file system directories, and their names are packageName.Let’s start by creating a Java file in a different directory.As an illustration: comma spliced Test.java is a Java class that tests a program’s functionality.Modify the Test.java file so that the package statement appears at the beginning of the file, as follows: com.test is a test package.Any class that is declared within the test directory is considered to be a member of the com.test package.

Here’s how to enter the code: test package; class Test public static void main(String args) System.out.println(″Hello World!″); com.test package; class Test Hello, World!is the output.In this case, the Test class is now a member of the com.test package.

Package Naming convention

The package name must be distinct from other packages (like a domain name).So there’s a tradition to build a package in the same way as a domain name is created, but in the opposite order.For example, com.company.name is a domain name.Each level of the package corresponds to a directory in your computer’s file system.It looks like this: com com firm com name Furthermore, there is no restriction on the number of subdirectories (package hierarchies) that can be created.

How to create a package in Intellij IDEA?

The following is the procedure for creating a package in IntelliJ IDEA:

  1. Right-click on the source folder
  2. select new and then package from the drop-down menu.
  3. A pop-up box will open, in which you may type in the name of the item.

Once the package has been formed, a folder structure identical to that of the package will be established on your file system. You may now construct classes, interfaces, and other types of objects within the package.

How to import packages in Java?

Using Java’s import statement, you may either import a whole package, as was done in the previous examples, or utilize only the classes and interfaces declared in the package.The following is the general form of an import statement: package.name should be imported.ClassName;/ To import only a specific class, import package.name.*;/ To import the entire package, import package.name.* Consider the import statement for the package java.util.Date; / this is just used for imports.Date class import java.io.*;/ imports all of the classes included inside the java.io package Java does not need the use of an import statement.To make use of a class or interface from a certain package, you may optionally include the package’s fully qualified name, which contains the package’s whole hierarchy.

Here is an example of how to import a package into your application using the import statement.import java.util from your source code Date; level of education MyClass is responsible for implementing Date / body / adverbs The identical task may be completed by referring to it by its fully qualified name, as follows: class MyClass is an implementation of the java.util package./body /date /body /body /body /body

Example: Package and importing package

Consider the following scenario: you have defined a package com.programiz that contains a class Helper.package com.programiz; public class Helper public static String getFormattedDollar (double value) return String.format(″$ percent.2f″, value); com.programiz; public static String getFormattedDollar (double value) return String.format(″$ percent.2f″, value); com.programi Now, you may include the Helper class from the com.programiz package in your implementation class’s import declaration.Once you’ve imported it, you may refer to the class by its name instead of its ID.Here’s how it’s done: import com.programiz.Helper; class UseHelper public static void main(String args) double value = 99.5; String formattedValue = Helper.getFormattedDollar(value); System.out.println(″formattedValue = ″ + formattedValue); com.programiz.Helper import com.programiz.Helper import com.programiz.Helper formattedValue = $99.50 in the output Here,

  1. It is defined in the com.programiz package
  2. the Helper class is imported into a separate file from the one in which it is declared. The file includes the UseHelper class
  3. the getFormattedDollar() method of the Helper class is invoked from inside the UseHelper class
  4. and the getFormattedDollar() method of the Helper class is invoked from within the UseHelper class.

It is specified in the com.programiz package; however, it is imported into a separate file than the Helper class. The UseHelper class is contained inside the file; the getFormattedDollar() method of the Helper class is invoked from within the UseHelper class; and the getFormattedDollar() method of the Helper class is invoked from within the UseHelper class

Create your first Java application

The goal of this article is to teach you how to develop a small Java program that publishes the message Hello, World!to the system output and then package it.Along the course, you will become familiar with IntelliJ IDEA features that can help you be more productive as a developer, such as coding aid and supplemental tools, which can help you be more productive.Watch the screencast and then follow the step-by-step instructions provided below:…

Prepare a project

Create a new Java project

In IntelliJ IDEA, a project is a logical unit that contains your source code, tests, libraries that you need, build instructions, and your personal settings all in a centralized location.

  1. Start the IntelliJ IDEA IDE. If the Welcome page appears, select New Project from the drop-down menu. Alternatively, pick from the main menu
  2. in the New Project wizard, select Java from the list on the left
  3. and then click Finish.
  4. The Java SDK is required in order to create Java apps with IntelliJ IDEA (JDK).
  5. If the required Java Development Kit (JDK) is already defined in IntelliJ IDEA, pick it from the Project SDK drop-down menu.
  6. Optionally, give the path to the JDK home directory (for example, /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines/jdk-13.0.1.jdk) if the JDK is installed on your machine but is not defined in the IDE.
  7. If you do not have the essential Java Development Kit (JDK) installed on your machine, pick. In the next box, choose the JDK vendor (for example, OpenJDK), the version, and the installation location, if necessary, and then click the Download button.
  8. We will not be utilizing any extra libraries or frameworks for this tutorial, so go to the next step.
  9. Don’t start with a template and make a project from it. For the sake of this lesson, we’re going to start at the beginning, so click Next.
  10. For example, you may call the project HelloWorld.
  11. Select a different default project location if required, and then click Finish.

Create a package and a class

Packages are used for a variety of purposes, including grouping together classes that belong to the same category or provide comparable functionality, structuring and organizing big systems with hundreds of classes, and storing data in a centralized location.

  1. The Project tool window should have a src folder. Right-click the src folder and choose New (or press Alt+Insert), then Java Class
  2. Fill in the Name area with the string com.example.helloworld.HelloWorld and hit the OK button.
  3. It is IntelliJ IDEA that produces the com.example.helloworld package, which contains the HelloWorld class.
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IntelliJ IDEA has automatically produced some contents for your class to go along with the file you’ve uploaded.The package statement and the class definition have been automatically added by the IDE in this example.This is accomplished through the use of file templates.Depending on the kind of file that you create, the integrated development environment (IDE) inserts basic code and formatting that is required to be present in all files of that type.More information on how to use and configure templates may be found in the File templates documentation.

Write the code

Add the main() method using live templates

  1. IntelliJ IDEA has automatically produced some content for your class to go along with the file you’ve uploaded. The package statement and the class definition have been automatically added by the IDE in this example. File templates are used to do this. If you create a file of a particular kind, the IDE will automatically insert basic code and formatting that is required to be present in all files of that type. Please see the File templates section for further information on how to use and customize templates.

Real-time templates are pieces of code that you may use to incorporate into your own programming.One of these fragments is the main.Typically, active templates contain blocks of code that you will utilize on a regular basis.Because you won’t have to enter the same code over and over again, using them can save you time.Visit Live templates for further information on where to obtain premade live templates as well as how to design your own custom live templates.

Call the println() method using code completion

IntelliJ IDEA automatically inserts a caret at the beginning of the next line after the declaration of the main() method. As an example, let’s say you have a function that publishes text to the standard system output.

  1. Type Sy and then choose the System class from the list of code completion recommendations (it’s in the standard java.lang package) from the list of code completion suggestions. Press Ctrl+. to insert the selection with a trailing comma at the end of the selection
  2. Press Ctrl+. again after typing o and selecting out
  3. Enter the letter p, choose the println(String x) function, and then press Enter to complete the command.
  4. IntelliJ IDEA displays a list of the different sorts of parameters that are available in the current context. This information is provided only for your convenience.
  5. ″ should be typed. The second quote mark is automatically inserted, and a caret is placed between the quotation marks to indicate that they are consecutive. Type Greetings, World!

Completely basic code completion analyzes the context surrounding where the caret is now located and delivers recommendations as you type. Manually bringing up the completion list may be done by pressing Ctrl+Space on your keyboard. Code completion provides further information on the various completion mechanisms available.

Build and run the application

Valid Java classes can be turned into bytecode using the bytecode compiler. With the help of the green arrow indicator in the gutter, you may compile and execute classes that include the main() function straight from the editor.

  1. In the window that appears, pick Run ‘HelloWorld.main()’ from the drop-down menu. Your code is being compiled by the IDE
  2. after the compilation is complete, the Run tool window appears at the bottom of the screen. The command that IntelliJ IDEA used to launch the built class is shown in the first line of the code. The second line displays the outcome of the program: Hello, World! And the final line displays the exit code 0, which indicates that the program was properly terminated. If your code is incorrect and the IDE is unable to build it, the Run tool window will display the appropriate exit code.

IntelliJ IDEA produces a specific run configuration when you click the Run button, which allows you to conduct a sequence of tasks.First and foremost, it creates your application.At this point, javac converts your source code into bytecode that can be executed by the JVM.Once javac has finished compiling the bytecode, it saves it to the out directory, which is shown by a yellow highlight in the Project tool window.After that, the bytecode is executed by the JVM.As you work with a file, IntelliJ IDEA does an automated analysis of the file that is now open in the editor, looking for a variety of issues ranging from syntax mistakes to typos.

The Inspections widget, located in the top-right corner of the editor, allows you to rapidly view all of the discovered problems and to examine each problem in further depth as needed.For further information, please see the current file.

Package the application in a JAR

When the code is complete, you may bundle your application as a Java archive (JAR) that can be shared with other developers for further development. An artifact is a Java archive that has been created.

Create an artifact configuration for the JAR

  1. Select File | Project Structure (Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S) from the main menu, and then Artifacts from the context menu.
  2. Select From modules with dependencies by clicking, pointing to the JAR, and selecting it.
  3. In the window that appears to the right of the Main Class field, click and pick HelloWorld (com.example.helloworld) from the drop-down menu.
  4. It is IntelliJ IDEA that builds the artifact configuration and displays its settings in the right-hand section of the Project Structure dialog box.
  5. Apply the modifications and exit the dialog box.

Build the JAR artifact

  1. Make a selection from the main menu, Build | Build Artifacts
  2. Select Build by pointing to the HelloWorld:jar file.
  3. If you now check in the out/artifacts folder, you’ll see that your JAR has been placed there.

Run the packaged application

Using it will allow you to verify that the JAR asset was appropriately built.

Create a run configuration for the packaged application

IntelliJ IDEA provides the ability to construct a specialized run configuration in order to launch a Java application bundled in a JAR.

  1. To edit configurations, press Ctrl+Shift+A, then find and perform the Edit Configurations action.
  2. In the Run/Debug Configurations dialog box, choose JAR Application by clicking and dragging it to the right.
  3. The following is the name of the new configuration: HelloWorldJar.
  4. In the Path to JAR area, indicate the path of the JAR file on your computer by clicking and dragging it there.
  5. Scroll down the dialog box until you reach Before launch, where you may click and choose.
  6. The result of doing so is that the HelloWorld.jar is generated automatically every time you run this run configuration.

Run settings enable you to specify how you want your program to be executed, as well as which arguments and parameters to use. It is possible to have many run configurations for the same program, each with its own set of parameters and options.

Execute the run configuration

Select the HelloWorldJar configuration from the toolbar, and then click to the right of the run configuration option to launch it. If you prefer shortcuts, you may also hit Shift+F10 to open the menu. Similar to previously, the Run tool window appears, displaying the results of the application.

The procedure has completed successfully, indicating that the application has been properly packed. The most recent modification was made on December 20, 2021.

Creating the package and class

We recommend that you use IntelliJ IDEA in full screen mode to ensure that you have the most available screen real estate for your new Hello World project.The project pane displays a list of all of the folders and files that are included in our projects.Although you may browse through the Project window using the mouse, the arrow keys are also available for convenience.You may also alter the appearance of this tool window by pressing Cmd+1 on a Mac or Alt+1 on a Windows or Linux computer.

Creating Your Package and Class

After that, you’ll need to create the package and the class that will contain the code.Packets of classes belonging to the same category or providing comparable functionality are used to organize classes that are similar in their functionality.They are important for organizing huge applications with hundreds of classes, which might be difficult to manage manually.On macOS, choose the blue src folder and press Cmd+N, on Windows and Linux, click Alt+Insert to create a new class.Choose Java Class from the drop-down menu.A basic class name can be entered here, but if you want to create a new class in a specific package, you can enter the entire package path, separated by dots, followed by the class name in this field instead.

For example, com.example.helloworld.HelloWorld is a class that represents the class com.example.helloworld.For example, example.com may be your desired domain, and HelloWorld could be the name of the Java class that IntelliJ IDEA would generate on your behalf.As soon as you press the Enter key, IntelliJ IDEA will generate the package that you requested, along with the appropriate directory structure for the package that you provided.A new HelloWorld.java class file has also been created, with its contents being constructed from a base set of instructions.Examples include the package statement and class declaration, where the class has the same name as the file and the package statement.

Coding Your HelloWorld Class

Shift+Enter is a shortcut key that allows you to jump to the next line in a class file.This will relocate the caret to the right point on the next line and will not break the preceding line, as seen below.Creating the standard Java main method is as simple as typing the word main.IntelliJ IDEA presents a live template that you may use to produce the whole code construct, allowing you to save a significant amount of time in the process.The shortcut keys Cmd+J on macOS and Ctrl+J on Windows/Linux will display the list of all Live Templates in IntelliJ IDEA that are valid for the current context as well.The Escape key will always exit a drop-down menu or conversation box without making any modifications to the contents.

3) To choose it, press the Enter key.Using IntelliJ IDEA, you will be able to produce the remainder of the code.You must now execute a function that publishes some text to the standard system output in order to complete the task.IntelliJ IDEA provides code completion as a feature.If you write Sy, a drop-down menu will appear with a list of potential classes you might wish to call.

You want System so that you may hit Control+dot on the selected choice while it is highlighted in red.It is important to note that case is important; entering sy rather than Sy will provide different results!5) Now type o, and IntelliJ IDEA will advise that you use out as the following function, which you should do.IntelliJ IDEA is displaying a list of the System class’s attributes and methods that are currently available.The techniques and fields that begin with the letter o are mentioned first, followed by those that begin with other letters of the alphabet.IntelliJ IDEA will now propose the println command when you hit Control+dot again.

To choose it, press the Enter key.The caret will be placed in the brackets by IntelliJ IDEA, allowing you to provide the parameter to the method.When you type in a quotation mark ″, IntelliJ IDEA will automatically shut the quote mark.Now that the quotations have been removed, you may enter your phrase, Hello World, in between them.In addition to the steps listed above, you may also type sout to view a live template that will generate the code construct for you; nevertheless, we intended to demonstrate code completion.Congratulations, you have just completed the development of your first Java application.

  • Using IntelliJ IDEA, java files such as this one may be turned into bytecode and executed as code.
  • Let’s have a look at it in the next step.
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Overview

It is our goal in this tutorial to walk through the process of creating an IntelliJ IDEA package in a Java project. Learn how to build a Java project with the IntelliJ IDE by following these steps: Package

The following are the steps to take in order to build a new Package in IntelliJ: Open the Project in a new window.Select Package from the File >> New >> Package drop-down menu.Alternatively, right-click on the source folder and select New >> Package from the context menu.The package is represented by a folder symbol in the menu.Enter the name of the new package and press the Enter key.As an illustration: com.testingdocs.sample The newly generated package will be displayed in the Project window on the left.

In the left Project pane, we can choose the newly generated package and then create project artifacts such as Classes, Interfaces, Annotations, and so on within the newly created package.In these artifacts, the package declaration statement would appear as the first statement, which would be as follows: package com.testingdocs.sample; Under the hood, the IDE would construct the folder structure shown below for the packagesrccomtestingdocssample folder.That’s all there is to it.This is the first time we have successfully built a new package in the IntelliJ IDE.

IntelliJ IDEA Tutorials

On this website, you may find IntelliJ IDE lessons in the following locations: For further information about the IntelliJ IDE, please see the following link:

Add items to your project

Having created a project, you may begin adding new elements to it, such as directories and packages, new classes, resources, and modules. You can even expand your project by including more modules as well.

Create new items

Create a new directory

  1. Right-click the node in which you want to create a new directory in the Project tool window (Alt+1), and then choose Create new directory. To use the Directory command instead, select the node and press Alt+Insert.
  2. Enter a name for the new directory and then press Enter.
  3. Create numerous nested directories by using names that are separated by slashes, such as folder/new-folder
  4. if you wish to create several subdirectories, use names that are separated by slashes, such as folder/new-folder

Create a new package

Packages in Java are used for collecting classes that belong to the same category or offer comparable functionality, for structuring and organizing big programs with hundreds of classes, and for organizing and structuring small applications with a few hundred classes.

  1. Right-click the node within the Sources Rootor Test Sources Rootin which you wish to create a new package in the Project tool window (Alt+1), and then select Create New Package. As an alternative, pick the node, press Alt+Insert, and then select Package.
  2. Enter a name for the new package and then click Enter.
  3. Lowercase letters should be used for package names. There are various more name guidelines for Java packages that you should adhere to as well
  4. for example,

Create a new empty file

  1. Create a new file in the Project tool window (Alt+1) by right-clicking the node in which you want to create it and selecting ″New File.″ As an alternative, pick the node, press Alt+Insert, and then select File
  2. Enter a name for the new file and the extension it will have, for example: File.js, and then click Enter.
  3. This dialog appears if the extension you have chosen is not connected with any of the file types that IntelliJ IDEA recognizes. If this occurs, the Register New File Type Association box appears. It is possible to connect an extension with one of the supported file types using this dialog box.

Create a new Java class

  1. Right-click the node in which you wish to create a new class in the Project tool window (Alt+1), and then select Create New Class. Alternatively, pick the node, press Alt+Insert, then choose Java Class from the drop-down menu.
  2. Enter the name of the new class into the text box.
  3. When creating new classes, make sure to follow the Java naming standard.

Right-click the node in which you want to create a new class in the Project tool window (Alt+1), and then pick Create New Class from the menu. As an alternative, pick the node, press Alt+Insert, and then select Java Class from the menu.
Then type the name of the new class into the text box.
When creating new classes, adhere to the Java naming standard.

Create a new module

It is possible to mix various technologies and frameworks into a single application using modules. When working with IntelliJ IDEA, you may construct many modules in a single project, with each module being responsible for its own framework.

  1. In the Project tool window, right-click the top-level directory and pick from the drop-down menu. The wizard for creating a new module appears.
  2. Choose a module type from the drop-down menu on the left.
  3. Module SDKs are listed on the right-hand side of the dialog box
  4. choose one from the list to use in the right-hand section. You have the option of using the project SDK or creating a new one.
  5. Select the extra libraries and frameworks that you wish to use in this module from the Additional Libraries and Frameworks section.
  6. The next step is to give the module a name and provide the path of the content root and the.iml file in the module’s configuration. You have the option of incorporating them into or excluding them from the project.
  7. Finish by pressing the Finish button.

More information on IntelliJ IDEA modules may be found in the section Modules.

Import items

Import files

  • You may add files to your project in a variety of methods, including the ones listed below: The file should be dragged from your system’s file manager to the appropriate node in the Project tool window.
  • Ctrl+C will copy the file to the system file manager, and then Ctrl+V will paste it into the appropriate node in the IDE Project tool window, as seen below.
  • In your system’s file manager, manually transfer the file to the project folder to which it belongs.

Example: Import an image

Images are included within resource files. Ideally, they should be kept in a separate folder called Resources Root. To add this folder to your project, create a new directory, right-click it in the Project tool window, and select Add Folder…

  1. Files should be copied into a file manager and then pasted into a folder containing resource files in the IDE Project tool window
  2. If required, make changes to the filename and destination location in the popup that appears. To proceed, click OK.
  3. Right-click on the picture you just pasted in the Project tool window and choose
  4. Place the caret at the appropriate line in the class in which you want to utilize the picture, and then click Ctrl+V to paste the path to the image into the document.
  5. Run the class to ensure that the picture has been appropriately added
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Import an existing module

A module from another project may be imported into your project by include the.iml file from that project:

  1. Then, pick Import Module from the main menu
  2. in the dialog box that appears, identify where the.iml file of the module that you wish to import is located, and then click Open. By doing so, you are connecting another module to the project without having to move any files from their original locations. If you do not need that all of the modules be contained within a single folder, the module import process is complete, and you can proceed with your project as usual.

More information on IntelliJ IDEA modules may be found in the section Modules. The most recent modification was made on April 12, 2021.

Create new packages, classes, and interfaces – IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition Essential Training Video Tutorial

IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition Essential Training is the title of the course.

Create new packages, classes, and interfaces

When developing additional components for your application, Intellij IDEA makes the process simple.If you are working in Java and want to better organize your code, you may want to consider creating a new package for your project.In the project window, you may quickly create a new package by right-clicking on an existing package and selecting ″new package.″ After that, you’ll get this dialog box, in which you may add a new sub package beneath the current package.Consider the following scenario: I could require a model package, or you could develop one that is more deeply nested.It will just take a few minutes for me to construct the model package, after which I will right-click and create a new class.Construct a class, and you’re saying, ″I want to create a new component.″ Furthermore, you may specify whether it will be a class in the interface, an enum or an enumeration, or a custom annotation using this window.

I’ll build a class named person, and that class will be responsible for creating the new file.You can also build new components from the menu by selecting file > new from the drop-down menu.You’ll see that the Java class is there once more.If you are working in a different language and have installed the plugin for that language, you will see items for that language in your list of entries.Creating a new Kotlin file class interface, enumeration, or object would, for example, be possible using this method.

That demonstrates how simple it is to add new components to your app.And once again, you can accomplish this by going to the project window and picking the location where you want that component to be placed, or you can go to the menu bar and select file new from there.

Create and build a custom package using IntelliJ

To create a JAR file, use the Java IntelliJ development environment, which you can then submit as a package to your Automation 360 Control Room.

Procedure

  1. Unzip the contents of the SDK package into your IdeaProjects directory, then change the folder A2019-package-sdk- to MetricToImperial to distinguish it from the other SDK packages. By default, the package is located at the following location: C:\Users\\IdeaProjects.
  2. Go to File >Open in IntelliJ IDEA and choose the project located at C:UsersIdeaProjects as the destination.
  3. MetricToImperial.
  4. Navigate to the settings.gradle file in the project root and double-click it. The rootProject.name should be set to ‘MetricToImperial’.
  5. Update the package.template file, which can be found in the src/main/resources/package.template directory.
  6. The name of the package should be changed from A2019DemoPackage to MetricToImperial.
  7. Make changes to the package name in the locales json file by going to src/main/resources/locales/en US.json
  1. Unzip the contents of the SDK package into your IdeaProjects directory, then change the folder A2019-package-sdk- to MetricToImperial to distinguish it from the original A2019-package. The package is located in the following location by default: C:\Users\\IdeaProjects.
  2. Go to File >Open in IntelliJ IDEA and choose the project located at C:UsersIdeaProjects as the target.
  3. MetricToImperial.
  4. Navigate to the settings.gradle file in the project root and double-click it to edit it. RootProject.name = ‘MetricToImperial’ should be set as the default.
  5. Update the package.template file, which can be found in the src/main/resources/package.template directory.
  6. The name of the package has been changed from A2019DemoPackage to MetricToImperial.
  7. Make changes to the package name in the locales json file by going to src/main/resources/locales/en US.json.

Create a new Java Class by selecting New >Java Class from the context menu of the metrictoimperial.commands package when right-clicking the package. Fill in the blanks with the name of the new class CMtoINCH:

  1. Open the CMtoINCH class in a new window. Delete everything below the class declaration statement and replace it with the following code: import static com.automationanywhere.commandsdk,model,DataType.NUMBER
  2. /BotCommand makes a class eligible to be treated as an action by allowing it to be invoked. @BotCommand /CommandPks adds the information that is necessary to be seen on the GUI. @CommandPkg(/) is a command package. Inside each container, there will be a label to indicate the unique name. name = ″CM to Inch,″ label = ″],″ node label = ″],″ description = ″],″ icon = ″ruler icon.svg,″ node label = ″],″ description = ″],″ icon = ″ruler icon.svg,″ / Information about the kind is returned. return type guarantees that only the appropriate type of variable is displayed on the user interface. If return label = ″]″, return type = NUMBER, and return required = true, then the function returns the following values:
  3. Copied and pasted the following code into the CMtoINCH class:
  1. /Determine the point at which the activity begins. Because the return type is String, the function returns a Value. When the action is executed, the idx 1 would be presented initially, along with a text box for inputting the value. @Idx(index = ″1″, type = AttributeType.NUMBER) @Idx(index = ″1″, type = AttributeType.NUMBER) /User interface labels @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg(label = ″]″) @Pkg A validation error should be thrown if the value is null, so that this may be avoided. @NotEmpty Double CMInput) @NotEmpty Double CMInput) /Internal validation is performed in order to prevent empty inputs. No null check is required because CMInput has the NotEmpty property. if (″″.equals(CMInput.toString().trim())) and (CMInput.toString().trim()) throw new BotCommandException(″The input of CM is necessary″)
  2. throw new BotCommandException(″The input of CM is required″)
  3. Try again with a different number. /The outcome of the conversion logic is equal to CMInput * 0.393701
  4. have a look at (Exception e) /Display a customized error message throw new BotCommandException(″Unable to convert ″ + CMInput.toString() + ″cm to inches″)
  5. throw new BotCommandException(″Unable to convert ″ + CMInput.toString() + ″cm to inches″)
  6. /Create a NumberValue object. a new NumberValue(result) should be returned
  7. Annotations and data types are used to determine which namespaces should be imported. The code does this automatically. Manually importing namespaces may be accomplished by selecting a highlighted line and pressing the keys alt and enter at the same time.
  8. Constructing the en US.json file is simple: navigate to the src directory, then to the resources directory, then to the en US.json file, and add the following fields after the label and description values: The variables ″CMtoINCH.label″ and ″CMtoINCH.node label″ are both ″cm to inches″, ″CMtoINCH.description″ is ″Convert centimeters to inches″, ″CMtoINCH.return label″ is ″Assign the Output in Inches to a Number Variable″, and ″CMtoINCH.CMInput.label″ is ″Centimeters to Convert to Inches.″ The variables
  9. Go to src >main >java >com.automationanyhwere.botcommand, and then delete the samples.commands and the samples packages. Delete the sample packages.
  10. Make the necessary changes to the CommandPkg annotation. Icons may be downloaded from Github.
  1. Download ruler icon.svg from github and save it as ruler icon.svg by right-clicking on the picture and selecting ″Save image as ruler icon.svg.″
  2. To save the picture iconwhite.svg from github, right-click on it and select ″Save image as iconwhite.svg.″
  3. Copy and paste both files into the src >main > resources >icons directory.
  1. Open the build.gradle file located in the project’s root directory. After the dependencies section, but before the final closing tag, copy and paste the following code into your document: If the exceptionFormat parameter is set to ″full,″ the test will log an error. useTestNG() afterSuite desc, result -> if (!desc.parent) println(″$ ″ + ″($ tests, ″ + ″$ successes, ″ + ″$ failures, ″ + ″$ skipped)″) useTestNG() afterSuite desc, result -> if (!desc.parent) println(″$ ″ + ″($ tests, ″ + ″$ successes, ″ + ″$ failures, ″ + ″$ skipped) maxHeapSize=″3g″
  2. maxHeapSize=″3g″
  3. Create a new directory by selecting New > Directory from the context menu of the source directory
  1. Specify the name of the source set in the Name box, or choose the testjava recommendation from the Gradle Source Sets.
  2. Create a new package by selecting New >Package from the context menu of the java directory.
  3. Com.automationanywhere.botcommand.metrictoimperial.commands is the name of the newly formed package.
  1. Specify testjava in the Name box, or choose the testjava recommendation from the Gradle Source Sets drop-down menu.
  2. A new package may be created by selecting New >Package from the context menu of the java directory.
  3. Enter the following information for the newly formed package: com.automationanywhere.botcommand.metrictoimperial.commands.
  1. Start by opening a terminal window and navigating to the MetricToImperial directory by typing the following: cd ″ percent USERPROFILE percent IdeaProjectsMetricToImperial″
  2. If you want to create the project, use the following command: gradlew.bat clean build shadowJar

The message BUILD SUCCESSFUL is shown. Occasionally, a build may fail because existing files could not be automatically erased, and a system notice displays indicating that the task: clean was not successfully completed and that the execution failed. Immediately dismiss all explorer windows and re-run the build to correct the problem.

Next steps

Custom packages can be added to your Control Room.

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