How Do I Apply For Disability Retirement From The Post Office?

If you are applying for disability retirement, you must complete SF 3107, Appli cation for Immediate Retirement, and SF 3112, Documentation In Support of Disability Retirement. Your employing agency will help you complete these forms and will forward the completed forms to the Office of Personnel Manage ment (OPM).
Postal Service Disability Retirement Application Process Report Number HR-AR-18-005 9 Postal Service Disability Retirement Application Process Report Number R-AR-18-005 10 Title Postal Service Disability Retirement Application Process.

Is it hard to get disability retirement from the post office?

This is not only a tough job, but an unsympathetic world. Federal Disability Retirement benefits from the U. S. Office of Personnel Management, whether under FERS or CSRS, is always an option for the Postal employee.

Who administers disability retirements for the postal service?

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) administers disability retirements for the Postal Service and the federal government, including approving/disapproving disability retirement applications.

Is it hard to get disability retirement from the post office?

This is not only a tough job, but an unsympathetic world. Federal Disability Retirement benefits from the U. S. Office of Personnel Management, whether under FERS or CSRS, is always an option for the Postal employee.

Who administers disability retirements for the postal service?

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) administers disability retirements for the Postal Service and the federal government, including approving/disapproving disability retirement applications.

Postal Service Disability Retirement Application Process

  1. Objective In the case of illness or accident that prevents an employee from finishing their usual career, disability retirement is an employee benefit that is available.
  2. Employees must achieve specific legislative, regulatory, and administrative requirements in order to be eligible for retirement disability benefits.
  3. The purpose of our audit was to determine the efficiency with which the Postal Service processed disability retirement applications.
  4. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) manages disability retirements for the United States Postal Service and the federal government, which includes reviewing and granting or refusing disability retirement requests.

The Human Resources Shared Services Center (HRSSC) and Eagan Accounting Service Center (ASC) of the United States Postal Service are responsible for assisting employees in completing the disability retirement application, collecting the applicants’ financial information, and submitting the application to the Office of Personnel Administration (OPM).Employees of the United States Postal Service retired in large numbers in fiscal year 2017, accounting for over 25% of all federal agency retirees.Furthermore, almost 2,000 additional employees sought for disability retirement.What the Office of the Inspector General discovered The Postal Service is efficient in processing retirement disability applications and submitting them to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) in time to meet its informal timeliness goals; however, as of September 30, 2017, there were 1,195 employees who had been waiting for an application decision from OPM for more than six months at the time of writing.Three hundred and ninety-eight of those employees had been waiting for a decision for more than a year.

In all, 398 applications were submitted by these employees, and we statistically sampled 94 of them.The Postal Service completed 95 percent (89 out of 94 instances) of disability retirement applications on time to fulfill their informal targets, according to the agency.Monthly meetings between Postal Service Human Resource Management and the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) are held to review a variety of human resources matters, including the progress of disability retirement applications.The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) does not always offer appropriate information on the progress of disability retirement applications, and it does not always notify the Postal Service of application decisions, according to Postal Service management.

When disability retirement decisions are not made in a timely manner, the employee may suffer a number of negative consequences, including a loss of income as well as the loss of health and life insurance coverage.Our research revealed that 20 employees had been on leave without pay for more than a year at the time of the application evaluation, during which time their health and life insurance coverage had lapsed.The Postal Service is also prohibited from hiring new employees to backfill jobs vacated by employees who are on leave without pay while awaiting the outcome of an application.

  • What the Office of Inspector General Suggested Our recommendation is that management continue to work with the Office of Personnel Management to address disability retirement application delays, and that management escalate concerns to Office of Personnel Management oversight bodies, such as Congress, the Government Accountability Office, and the Office of Inspector General.
  • Read the entire report.

‘Disability’ Applications

  1. A version of this story first published in the January/February 2007 edition of The American Postal Worker magazine.
  2. Doug Holbrook is the director of the film.
  3. Having to retire early because of a handicap is a difficult situation for anyone to be in.
  4. A large number of APWU members who are eligible for disability benefits do not, and we believe that members who are qualified for disability benefits should be fully aware of the requirements before filing for disability retirement.

Those who have retired under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), the Federal Employees Retirement System, or under the CSRS Offset regulations are subject to the restrictions that follow.

Retirement Requirements

  1. Application for Immediate Retirement form (SF-2801), as well as the Documentation in Support of Disability Retirement form (SF-2801), must be completed by applicants seeking disability retirement benefits under the CSRS and CSRS Offset coverage (SF 2824A).
  2. Applicants who are covered by the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) must have completed at least five years of federal civilian service to be considered.
  3. Forms SF-3107 and SF-3105A must be completed by applicants for the Federal Employees Retirement System.
  4. A minimum of 18 months of federal civilian duty and an application for Social Security disability benefits are required in order to be considered eligible for this program.

The acceptance or denial of a Social Security disability claim, on the other hand, has no effect on the Office of Personnel Management’s decision on disability retirement benefits.Before asking for disability retirement, employees should ensure that the USPS has received comprehensive evidence of their medical issues and that the USPS has made all reasonable efforts to keep them working.You must have become incapacitated as a result of a sickness or accident that happened while you were working for the United States Postal Service.It must be anticipated that the handicap will persist at least one year.The local United States Postal Service Personnel office will assist you in obtaining the necessary documents to acquire statements from your supervisors and visiting physicians on your behalf.

Their remarks will serve as evidence that your medical condition hinders you from providing valuable and efficient service to the public.But it is your obligation to submit the application and accompanying paperwork to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), which will assess whether a finding of impairment is justified.

Disability Claims

  • A claim for disability retirement must be accompanied by paperwork that proves a ″service deficit″ in a straightforward and detailed manner. The claim must demonstrate the following: Performance, behavior, or attendance deficiencies
  • or in the absence of any genuine service deficiencies, a demonstration that the medical condition is incompatible with either effective service or retention in the post
  • It includes psychological diseases and other medical conditions such as sickness or damage.
  • That the medical condition was the root cause of the service inadequacy
  • The length of your medical condition, both in the past and in the future, as well as evidence indicating your disease will most likely remain for at least a year
  • It was discovered that the employee was unable to provide useful and deficient service while serving as a member of the Civil Service Retirement System
  • the employer was unable to make reasonable accommodations for the employee’s medical condition
  • and there was no other position available within the employing agency and commuting area, at the same grade or pay level and tenure, for which the employee was eligible for reassignment.

OPM will not reimburse you for any medical examination or procedure that is required in order to produce the required paperwork.

When to Apply

  1. Applications for disability retirement must be submitted either before to separation from the Postal Service or within one year of the date of departure from the Postal Service.
  2. It is your obligation (or the responsibility of your guardian or other ″interested person″) to guarantee that your application is submitted to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) within the time limit.
  3. If you are still employed at the time of your application, Shared Services (previously Human Resources) will compile all of the relevant disability documentation and submit it to the Office of Personnel Management.
  4. OPM will then acknowledge receipt of your application by issuing you a claim number, and either you or Shared Services will be contacted for any additional information that may be required of you.

The decision will be communicated to both the Postal Service and the applicant in writing.If your claim is granted, Shared Services will be requested to remove you from its rolls and will provide your final retirement records to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).The personnel staff will also decide the actual date of separation; annuity benefits will begin accruing on the first day following an employee’s salary as a result of his or her termination will be determined by the personnel staff.

USPS Disability

  1. The United States Postal Service offers protection in the form of Leave of Absence and Disability Retirement benefits to its employees.
  2. The present leave and Postal disability benefits are two independent plans that, regrettably, do not always function in concert with one another.
  3. Your current leave and Postal disability benefits are two separate plans that do not always work in concert with one another.
  4. It is possible that you will qualify for one, but this does not imply that you will automatically qualify for the other, and here is where ManhattanLife coverage may be beneficial.

USPS Disability

  1. An injury is almost certain to occur at some time in your life, whether you slip and fall, are involved in a vehicle accident, or break a leg sliding into third base at the baseball diamond.
  2. If this leads you to be absent from work for an extended period of time, it can be a difficult situation.
  3. It is unavoidable that injuries occur.
  4. We provide solutions that can fulfill your existing disability coverage requirements while also assisting you in determining the best methods to optimize your benefits.

What Happens if You Become Ill?

Do you know anybody who has had a heart attack or a stroke, or who has been admitted to the hospital due to an infection? It is likely that you have known or worked with someone who has been forced to miss work for a lengthy period of time due to an illness at some point in your life.

Some Thoughts on Social Security and FERS Disability Retirement

  1. When applying for Federal Disability Retirement benefits under the FERS, it is ″necessary″ that you file for Social Security Disability benefits first.
  2. This additional step, on the other hand, has always been a source of confusion and frustration.
  3. Why is it necessary for a Federal or Postal employee who is applying for Federal Disability Retirement benefits to also apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)?
  4. What are the ramifications of being refused (which is the case for the vast majority of Federal and Postal employees)?

What happens if a Federal or Postal employee who is applying for FERS Disability Retirement benefits is later accepted for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)?It is not uncommon for major obstacles, confusing administrative procedures, and complex, almost unintelligible roadblocks to impede the filing of a Federal Disability Retirement application – not the least of which is the requirement to file for Social Security Disability benefits with the United States Social Security Administration.Most Federal Agency Human Resource Offices will tell you that you ″must″ file for Social Security benefits before applying for FERS Disability Retirement benefits, as if doing so is a requirement for even a preliminary consideration of a Federal Disability Retirement application.However, this is not the case in reality.Even the United States Postal Service Shared Services Office in Greensboro, North Carolina, will not process a Federal Disability Retirement application unless there is evidence that a Social Security Disability Insurance application has been filed, as evidenced by the fact that an SSDI application has been filed.

Is this, in fact, what the law mandates?And, perhaps more importantly, how far should one go in fulfilling the requirement – is it sufficient to make a cursory effort to satisfy the formality, or must one wait until all appeals have been exhausted (which, in the case of SSDI procedures, could take years, by which time the one-year statute of limitations for filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits may have expired)?

FERS Disability Retirement and SSDI Offset

  1. The simple reality is that the United States Office of Personnel Management could give a flying fig about Social Security Disability Insurance – unless and until it is authorized, and then only if and when the FERS Disability Retirement application is granted as well as the SSDI application.
  2. Because the law mandates an offset between the two (FERS Disability Retirement and SSDI benefits), if both are approved (FERS Disability Retirement and SSDI benefits), a 100 percent offset must be made in the first year of concurrent payments (in which the FERS annuitant would receive 60 percent of the average of one’s highest three consecutive years of service), followed by a 60 percent offset in the subsequent concurrent years of payments (where the FERS annuity is paid at 40 percent ).
  3. It’s the offset itself that the Department of Labor is concerned about, and because Social Security payments are primary (meaning that SSDI payments are paid in full) and the FERS Disability Annuity is ″secondary″ (where the offset occurs by reducing the amount of the FERS Disability Annuity by the percentage of legally-mandated offset required), OPM is concerned that an approval of SSDI benefits will have an impact on the amount of annuity payments calculated by OPM’s disability retirement system.
  4. What is the interactive procedure – between filing for a FERS Disability Retirement and applying for Social Security Disability Insurance – and how does it function?

Here’s an illustration: A Federal or Postal employee begins preparing to file for a Federal Disability Retirement application and begins completing the SF 3107 series of forms, as well as the SF 3112 series of forms, in order to qualify for federal disability retirement benefits.When someone is advised that they must file for Social Security Disability Insurance and provide documentation of such filing together with the other Standard Forms for a Federal Disability Retirement application, they understand that this is only the beginning of a long process.He does so – he files, well aware that his application would be refused, especially given the fact that he is technically still ″employed″ by the Federal agency or the USPS.″Why do I have to file?″ he inquires of himself.The rationale is because it is required by law, and regardless of whether the legislation makes sense or not, it is an unavoidable duty.

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The FERS retirement paradigm has traditionally been built on a three-tiered financial structure, which includes the following components: The Federal Retirement System; Social Security; and the Thrift Savings Plan (Thrift Savings Plan).When one component (retirement itself) is accessible, the second component (Social Security) must be applied for at the same time as well.The criteria has been met as a result of the filing.Questions: Is there anything more you need to do?

Is it possible for you to just not put up much effort?Is it necessary to file an appeal if your SSDI application is denied?The responses were as follows: no, yes, and no.

  • Postscript: If you are approved for your Federal Disability Retirement application, would you be need to reapply once you have left your current position?
  • Not necessary; however, if the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) requests that you re-file, you should go ahead and file with the SSDI Office once again.
  • If you are filing for Social Security Disability benefits while also filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits, what are some of the elements to consider when deciding how aggressively to seek Social Security Disability benefits?
  • Here are some considerations to bear in mind: Understand that there is an offset between FERS Disability Retirement annuity and Social Security Disability Insurance benefits – a 100 percent offset in the first year of concurrent benefits with a FERS annuity at the 60 percent rate; then a 60 percent offset in all subsequent years (until recalculation at age 62) while FERS benefits are paid at the 40 percent rate.
  • Because Social Security is considered ″primary,″ the offsetting decrease is applied to the FERS Disability pension rather than the Social Security Disability payout.
  • As a result, Social Security has a very low threshold for being able to earn any income before you ″lose″ your benefits (normally somewhere in the range of $1200 – $1300 per month), and if the FERS Disability Annuitant intends to work in some private sector job earning more than the threshold amount, it may not be worthwhile to pursue Social Security Disability benefits aggressively.

Consider the following comparison between the low SSDI threshold and the authorized amount for a FERS Disability Annuity: You are permitted to earn up to 80% of the salary that you were previously earning in your previous employment.

An example of the FERS-SSDI offset calculation

  • As an illustration, consider the following: Annuitant A is a hypothetical person who will get a pension. A former Postal worker earned $55,000.00 per year in compensation (and, for purposes of making this example simple, the same amount for the average of his highest-3 consecutive years of service.) He receives $33,000 as his FERS annuity in the first year (60 percent of $55,000), and $22,000 as his FERS annuity in the second year (40 percent of $55,000) in the next two years, as follows: In order to keep things simple, let’s estimate that it works out to around $3,000 per month for the first year, and then $2,000 per month for the following years. Similarly, the former Postal worker is authorized for SSDI, with the monthly benefit amounting to $2,000 per month. What is the procedure for using the offset? The first year the postal worker would receive $2,000 from Social Security and $1,000 from his FERS annuity (because 100 percent of the SSDI payment is offset against the FERS payment), and in subsequent years he would receive $2,000 from Social Security as well as $800.00 from his FERS annuity (because 100 percent of the SSDI payment is offset against the FERS payment) (as 60 percent of the SSDI payment is offset against the FERS payment). If Annuitant A works in the private sector and earns $1,000 per month, everything is OK — for the simple reason that this amount does not exceed the threshold for either the FERS Disability Retirement annuity or the SSDI authorized amount. The SSDI benefit will be forfeited if he goes out and earns more than $2,000 per month, or a greater sum that falls below the Social Security eligibility criteria. Any past offset with FERS will be reversed to allow for the full annuity payment. Consequently, while seeking Social Security Disability benefits concurrently with a FERS Disability Retirement application, the variables that one should evaluate should take the following questions into account: What type of private sector employment do I want to pursue after obtaining a FERS Disability Retirement annuity, and how soon after that do I plan to begin earning a salary in that field, and what kind of salary do I hope to earn in that field?
  • Will it be profitable if I go out and acquire a job that pays more than the Social Security level of allowable limitations, even if the combination of FERS Disability Annuity and SSDI benefits will net me more money in the long run? Since the offset against a FERS annuity payment is supposed to be recalculated by OPM if the SSDI benefit is lost, in practice this is a time-consuming and inefficient bureaucracy that can take several months to recover the full benefit
  • as a result, in many cases, the SSDI benefit will be lost entirely.
  • Do I plan to work in the private sector, where pursuing SSDI will be impossible, and, as a result, should I put in the bare minimum of effort to just comply with the requirement of filing for SSDI?

Be careful…

  1. All of these factors should be considered throughout the preliminary stages of the project.
  2. In principle, getting accepted for SSDI and receiving both the FERS annuity and the SSDI benefit – even with the offset – would appear to be a ″no-brainer,″ given that the combination of the two will nearly always result in you receiving more money overall.
  3. However, there is a disclaimer regarding what has been happening more and more often.
  4. The ″Offset″ between the FERS Federal Disability Retirement pension and Social Security Disability Insurance payments is expected to occur on its own.

The use of Social Security numbers and other identifying variables for cross-checking would seem to make sense in this computer-age of technical growth, when cross-checking would be very routine and automatic.Reconsider your position.Numerous hundreds, if not thousands, of Federal and Postal Federal Disability Retirement annuitants are notified years later that they have received a ″overpayment″ that must be refunded and reimbursed — a sum that, in some cases, amounts to hundreds of thousands or perhaps millions of dollars.What causes this to happen, and how does it happen?The reason is simple: the two departments – the Office of Personnel Management and the Social Security Administration – never talked with one another, never cross-checked the payments, and, most critically, never offset the requisite amount.

As a result, a Federal or Postal employee who was accepted for both FERS Disability Retirement benefits and Social Security Disability Insurance benefits received two ″full″ checks, which he or she proceeded to deposit and spend in equal amounts.Then there are many who would argue that repaying the government is only fair because you should have known that the offset wasn’t going to happen, and you should have ″put aside″ a money equal to the offset amount knowing that you would eventually be ″caught″ accepting both.The reality is that, regardless of whether the Federal or Postal dual-annuitant was aware of the overpayment, was unaware of it, did not believe he or she would be ″caught″ or be required to repay the amount of the overpayment, the simple fact of the matter is that overpayment based on incompetence of the Federal bureaucracy occurs all too often, and because the funds from a FERS Disability Retirement come from the United States Government, when that oversight is lacking.Finally, a final thought on the issue of Stephenson v.

OPM, which was debated before the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and decided on January 18, 2013, and which was a big victory for this author.That case involved the Department of Labor’s refusal to restore the full amount of a FERS Disability Retirement annuity despite the loss of the offsetting SSDI benefits, arguing that there was a period during which the annuitant remained ″entitled″ to SSDI benefits even though the Social Security Administration did not pay him any money.In this case, OPM declined to recalculate and restore the FERS Disability annuity amount, and instead continued to offset a phantom payment on the grounds that the individual was still potentially ″entitled″ to the amount.

  • Because of the ruling in Stephenson v.
  • OPM, that problem has been settled; nonetheless, a word of caution should be issued in this case about offsets.
  • Obtaining SSDI approval, working, and earning a sum that exceeds the SSDI threshold, and then requesting that OPM restore the previously offset amount and recalculate such that the full FERS Disability annuity is paid, is theoretically and legally possible to accomplish.
  • However, in practice, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is a vast and complex bureaucracy that takes an eternity to answer.
  • Keep that in mind at all times.
  • Maintain these considerations in mind if you are dealing with SSDI, offsets, or Federal Employees’ Retirement System disability retirement: The fact that you are ″right″ does not necessarily mean that you will recover quickly – whether on the issue of restoration and recalculation of a lost benefit, whether it concerns overpayment, or any other issue involving SSDI, FERS Disability Retirement annuity, and the interacting, offsetting features between the two.

As a result, as with anything else, make sure to plan ahead of time.Sincerely, Robert R.McGill, Esquire is a Federal Disability Attorney in the District of Columbia.a little about the author A federal disability retirement specialist, Robert R.McGill devotes 100 percent of his time to assisting Federal and Postal employees in obtaining their disability retirement benefits under the FERS and CSRS systems.

He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University.Visit his Federal Disability Attorney website for additional information on his legal services, publications, and public forum.

Canada Pension Plan Post-Retirement Disability Benefit

From the Department of Employment and Social Development.

What the Post-Retirement Disability Benefit offers

  1. The Post-Retirement Disability Benefit is a new benefit that became available on January 1, 2019, and has been in effect since then.
  2. A disability pension is intended for Canadian Pension Plan (CPP) retirement pension beneficiaries who have been determined to be disabled but are ineligible for a disability pension because they have been CPP retirement pension beneficiaries for more than 15 months, as determined by a medical examination.
  3. Application for this benefit may be possible for applicants who have made sufficient contributions to qualify, in addition to their existing retirement benefits.

Eligibility

The eligibility requirements for the disability pension under the Canada Pension Plan are the same as for the pension under the Canada Pension Plan. You must do the following:

  1. Have a serious and sustained mental or physical medical condition, according to the term in the Canada Pension Plan law
  2. fulfill the minimum contribution requirements
  3. and be less than 65 years old.
  • To achieve the minimum contributing criteria, you must have made legitimate contributions to the CPP in four of the past six years
  • have contributed for at least 25 years, including three of the last six years
  • and have contributed for at least 25 years, including three of the last six years.
  • Satisfies all of the requirements of the late applicant provision

As a result, if you apply for CPPdisability benefits but are not qualified because you have been receiving the CPRetirement pension for more than 15 months, we will immediately examine your eligibility for the post-retirement disability benefit on your behalf.

How to apply

The application for this benefit is not seperate from the rest of the application process. You will be required to submit an application for CPP disability payments.

How much you could receive

It is the flat rate component of the disability pension that determines the amount of the Post-Retirement Disability Benefit. For the year 2022, it is $524.64. This sum will be paid until the individual reaches the age of 65, after which the PRDB payment will be discontinued and the person will continue to receive the retirement pension.

How does the Post-Retirement Disability Benefit interact with your other benefits

  1. This benefit is provided in addition to your CPP retirement income until you reach the age of 65.
  2. It can be claimed at any time throughout your working life.
  3. If you have any dependent children, you may be eligible for a disabled contributor’s child benefit.
  4. Benefits from the CPP may have an impact on the income you get from other programs.

Income-tested benefits such as the War Veterans Allowance, Employment Insurance, the Guaranteed Income Supplement, the Allowance, and the Allowance for the Survivor are some of the benefits that take your CPP income into consideration.Other income-tested benefits include provincial and territorial social assistance (″welfare″) and disability benefits, as well as most workers’ compensation programs.Your CPP benefits may also have an impact on the amount of money you get from your employer’s pension or private-sector disability insurance plan.

Applying for Retirement Benefits

Answers to frequently asked questions regarding applying for federal retirement benefits.

Questions and answers

  • For the most typical circumstances, it takes around 60 days (2 months) to complete applications. Your application may take longer to process if we require extra information from you or your former employer
  • if we require further information from you or your former employer
  • If your retirement claim involves unusual conditions, such as applying under disability provisions, a specialized retirement legislation (LEO, FF, or ATC), or reviewing a court decision, you should consult with an attorney.
  • We need to get in touch with you in order to make a benefit selection, such as a service credit deposit
  • and
  • If a benefit from another agency, such as the Social Security Administration, has an influence on your claim, we will need to contact them.
  • Find out how long it takes on average for the federal government to process retirement applications. Your agency’s human resources and payroll departments collaborate to put together your retirement application packet, which is then forwarded to the Office of Personnel Management for processing. Your human resources department will work to: Obtain and complete an Agency Check List of Immediate Retirement Procedures (SF-2801, Schedule D for CSRS, or SF-3701, Schedule D for FERS).
  • Prepare and have your signature placed on the Certified Summary of Federal Service (SF-2801-1 for CSRS and SF-3701-1 for FERS), if applicable.
  • Check your Official Personnel Folder for any service that is not completely recorded. (If any documentation is missing, your human resources department may need to contact government record centers for assistance.) After receiving your retirement application packet, OPM will work to finish the verification process if they are unable to do so themselves. This procedure will add time to the processing of your application.) Certification and transfer of your coverage under the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) program to OPM
  • Certification and transfer of your enrollment under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program to OPM
  • preparation of a Notification of Personnel Action (SF-50)
  • preparation of a Notification of Personnel Action (SF-50)
  • Send all of your retirement materials to the payroll office of your organization.
  • Their team will deliver your retirement package to your company’s payroll office, where they will work to: Authorize your last pay check and lump sum payout for unused annual leave
  • and
  • Prepare your Individual Retirement Record (SF-2806 for Civil Service or SF-3100 for Federal Employees Retirement System), which chronicles your federal service, pay history, and yearly retirement contributions.
  • Send all of your retirement documents to the Office of Personnel Management for processing.
  1. We’ll tell you as soon as OPM gets your retirement package from your agency, and we’ll issue you a claim number at that time.
  2. Following receipt of this communication and claim number, you may contact us to inquire about the status of your retirement application’s processing, if you so want.
  3. The Office of Personnel Management will send you a welcoming letter as well as a customised retirement pamphlet.
  4. Your booklet will outline your entire retirement benefits package, including how much your monthly annuity payment will be, how you will enroll in health care and life insurance coverage, and the information you will need to prepare your annual tax returns.
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You will also receive a copy of your booklet.Maybe.A major reorganization, reduction in force, or transfer of function occurs at your agency, and a significant percentage of the employees will be separated or will see their pay reduced, the head of your agency can request that OPM allow eligible employees to take advantage of early optional retirement before the rest of their agency.In the event that your agency is granted clearance to allow for early voluntary retirements, eligible workers will be advised of the chance to voluntarily leave their positions.Learn more about the CSRS’s early elective retirement program.

Learn more about early voluntary retirement under the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS).A retirement application that has been completed and signed is comparable to a letter of resignation.If you are leaving the federal government but are eligible for a retirement payout in the future, you should reconsider your decision to leave the service.You should just postpone submitting your retirement application until a later time.

This is due to the fact that if you die after separating from duty but before filing a retirement application, your survivors will be unable to obtain life insurance, a survivor benefit, or survivor health benefits.You should still complete all of the necessary leaving processes from your HR office, if any are required.

‘Disability’ Applications

  1. A version of this story first published in the January/February 2007 edition of The American Postal Worker magazine.
  2. Doug Holbrook is the director of the film.
  3. Having to retire early because of a handicap is a difficult situation for anyone to be in.
  4. A large number of APWU members who are eligible for disability benefits do not, and we believe that members who are qualified for disability benefits should be fully aware of the requirements before filing for disability retirement.

Those who have retired under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), the Federal Employees Retirement System, or under the CSRS Offset regulations are subject to the restrictions that follow.

Retirement Requirements

  1. Application for Immediate Retirement form (SF-2801), as well as the Documentation in Support of Disability Retirement form (SF-2801), must be completed by applicants seeking disability retirement benefits under the CSRS and CSRS Offset coverage (SF 2824A).
  2. Applicants who are covered by the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) must have completed at least five years of federal civilian service to be considered.
  3. Forms SF-3107 and SF-3105A must be completed by applicants for the Federal Employees Retirement System.
  4. A minimum of 18 months of federal civilian duty and an application for Social Security disability benefits are required in order to be considered eligible for this program.

The acceptance or denial of a Social Security disability claim, on the other hand, has no effect on the Office of Personnel Management’s decision on disability retirement benefits.Before asking for disability retirement, employees should ensure that the USPS has received comprehensive evidence of their medical issues and that the USPS has made all reasonable efforts to keep them working.You must have become incapacitated as a result of a sickness or accident that happened while you were working for the United States Postal Service.It must be anticipated that the handicap will persist at least one year.The local United States Postal Service Personnel office will assist you in obtaining the necessary documents to acquire statements from your supervisors and visiting physicians on your behalf.

Their remarks will serve as evidence that your medical condition hinders you from providing valuable and efficient service to the public.But it is your obligation to submit the application and accompanying paperwork to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), which will assess whether a finding of impairment is justified.

Disability Claims

  • A claim for disability retirement must be accompanied by paperwork that proves a ″service deficit″ in a straightforward and detailed manner. The claim must demonstrate the following: Performance, behavior, or attendance deficiencies
  • or in the absence of any genuine service deficiencies, a demonstration that the medical condition is incompatible with either effective service or retention in the post
  • It includes psychological diseases and other medical conditions such as sickness or damage.
  • That the medical condition was the root cause of the service inadequacy
  • The length of your medical condition, both in the past and in the future, as well as evidence indicating your disease will most likely remain for at least a year
  • It was discovered that the employee was unable to provide useful and deficient service while serving as a member of the Civil Service Retirement System
  • the employer was unable to make reasonable accommodations for the employee’s medical condition
  • and there was no other position available within the employing agency and commuting area, at the same grade or pay level and tenure, for which the employee was eligible for reassignment.

OPM will not reimburse you for any medical examination or procedure that is required in order to produce the required paperwork.

When to Apply

  1. Applications for disability retirement must be submitted either before to separation from the Postal Service or within one year of the date of departure from the Postal Service.
  2. It is your obligation (or the responsibility of your guardian or other ″interested person″) to guarantee that your application is submitted to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) within the time limit.
  3. If you are still employed at the time of your application, Shared Services (previously Human Resources) will compile all of the relevant disability documentation and submit it to the Office of Personnel Management.
  4. OPM will then acknowledge receipt of your application by issuing you a claim number, and either you or Shared Services will be contacted for any additional information that may be required of you.

The decision will be communicated to both the Postal Service and the applicant in writing.If your claim is granted, Shared Services will be requested to remove you from its rolls and will provide your final retirement records to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).The personnel staff will also decide the actual date of separation; annuity benefits will begin accruing on the first day following an employee’s salary as a result of his or her termination will be determined by the personnel staff.

5 Steps to Filing an Application for Federal Disability Retirement

  1. In the United States, federal civil service personnel and postal workers who satisfy specific qualifications are eligible for disability retirement benefits from the government.
  2. A breakdown of the requirements for federal disability retirement may be broken down into six phases, each of which focuses on one of the factors that an employee must demonstrate in order to be considered qualified for a federal disability retirement pension.

1. Confirm Your Eligibility

  1. First, it must be determined that the federal employee or postal worker is ″eligible.″ An qualified FERS federal employee must have completed at least 18 months of service in a job covered by the FERS program in order to be considered.
  2. A CSRS federal employee must have five years of creditable service in a position covered by the CSRS before becoming eligible for retirement (the system of federal retirement benefits until 1987).

2. Establish Evidence of Your Disability

  • Second, the federal employee or postal worker must be unable to work due to a medical condition. If a medical condition has resulted in a ″service deficit in performance, conduct, or attendance″ or an incapacity to provide ″useful and efficient service,″ the federal employee is considered disabled for the purposes of federal disability retirement. What exactly does this mean? Briefly stated, you must be unable to perform the essential tasks of your present FERS or CSRS work due to your impairment in order to be eligible for disability benefits. You are not need to demonstrate that you are unable to perform any sort of employment. This is, by far, the most hardest factor to show in any case. The following are examples of the kind of evidence that will be considered: Objective clinical findings, diagnoses, and medical opinions
  • subjective evidence of pain and impairment
  • and any other information pertaining to the effect of the applicant’s condition on her ability to function in the grade or class of position she most recently held are acceptable.
  1. When your subjective proof of impairment and discomfort (for example, your written comments and testimony) is backed up by competent medical evidence, your evidence will be accorded more weight in the court of law.
  2. I thus urge that you seek the assistance of an attorney in collaboration with your doctor to develop a well-prepared medical examination of your ailment and the impact it has on your ability to execute the job responsibilities associated with your employment.

3. Establish Continuity of Your Disability

To qualify for disability retirement, a federal employee must be able to demonstrate ″continuity,″ which means the debilitating medical condition must be projected to last at least one year after filing a disability retirement application with the Social Security Administration.

4. Prove You Could Not Be Accommodated or Reassigned

To prove that he or she has not denied a reasonable offer of transfer to a vacant post, the federal employee must demonstrate that the employing government agency is unable to accommodate the employee’s debilitating medical condition in the position to which he or she has been assigned.

5. File for Social Security Disability Insurance

If you are under the age of 62, the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) requires you to apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. To learn more about Social Security Disability Insurance, see our webpage on the subject.

6. File the Application and Supporting Documentation

  • Please complete the following fields. Form SF 3107, Request for Immediate Retirement, as well as
  • Form SF 3112, Disability Retirement Documentation in Support of Retirement

Make sure to include paperwork proving that you have applied for SSDI when you submit these forms.

Next: File a Timely Appeal

  1. If the Office of Personnel Management rejects your application for federal disability retirement, you must file an appeal within 30 days.
  2. To begin, you must submit a request for reconsideration.
  3. If the Office of Personnel Management rejects your timely request for reconsideration, you have the opportunity to file an appeal with the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB).
  4. When applying for federal disability retirement, the FERS application procedure can be intimidating and burdensome for those who are not familiar with it.

In addition to the factors stated above, decades of case law have clarified and defined some of the parts listed above, and you may be required to supply additional or less information depending on your specific circumstances.If you have any worries about whether or not you will be authorized for a disability retirement annuity, or if you have been rejected, you should consult with a disability lawyer.

If Your Benefits Are Terminated

  1. The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has the authority to determine that you have been ″restored to earning capacity″ or ″medically recovered″ and to terminate your federal disability retirement benefits.
  2. Occasionally, this occurs when a civil service annuity is awarded for a mental health illness for which there is a reasonable prospect of recovery or medical improvement.
  3. If the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) terminated your disability retirement because your health improved, you may be able to have it reinstated if your condition worsens again while you are under the age of 62.
  4. It makes a difference whether your annuity was terminated because you recovered or because you were restored to earning capacity when you file a reinstatement request; the conditions for doing so are slightly different.

If you want to request the reinstatement of previously terminated federal disability retirement benefits, you must file an application with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

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Disability Benefits & The Special Rules – USPS Disability

  1. Unfortunately, there are certain government workers who may develop a medical or mental condition that makes it difficult (if not impossible) for them to continue in their positions.
  2. These federal workers are eligible to apply for disability retirement if their condition has been established and is projected to last for at least a year or longer.
  3. When it comes to permanent disability payments, once they are approved, they are often not examined again.
  4. However, if it is decided that the condition is not permanent, then periodic medical exams will be required until the employee reaches the age of sixty-five.

Both the Federal Retirement System (FERS) and the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) provide disability payments if you are handicapped to the degree where you are unable to perform efficient and valuable work in your current employment.Members of the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) and the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) have differing requirements for the number of service years necessary to be eligible for disability retirement.While an employee of the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) must have completed eighteen months of civilian service, an employee of the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) must have completed five years of civilian service.You must submit the proper documents to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) in order to be considered for disability retirement.This can be accomplished with the cooperation of your agency, and your agency must affirm that it is unable to accommodate your circumstances in your current employment, or in any other position with the same pay and grade level as your current post.

Employees of the CSRS Offset or the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) must additionally file a disability retirement application with the Social Security Administration (SSA).The Social Security Administration (SSA) has a separate (far higher) criterion by which they decide whether or not you are handicapped.According to their policies, you must be severely handicapped and unable to perform your job tasks in order to qualify.It should be noted that disability retirement is a distinct benefit in and of itself, since it is distinct from the compensation granted by the Federal Employees Compensation Act, which is administered by the Labor Department and covers only injuries or illnesses that occur as a result of employment.

In an ideal situation, if you qualify for both federal disability retirement and FECA benefits, you will be forced to choose between the two benefits.In your capacity as a handicapped worker, what kind of benefits may you expect to receive?Employees under the CSRS will get about 40% of their ″high-3″ years of average pay, or an amount equal to the sum of your actual service from the day your disability retirement began up until the age of 60, whichever is greater.

  • However, if your service credit calculation results in you being approved for more than 40% of the total, you will get the additional amount calculated on top of the 40 percent minimum.
  • If you are under the age of 62 and employed by the Federal Employees Retirement System, you will be paid 60 percent of your ″high-3″ average pay, less 100 percent of the benefit for social security disability for the first twelve months of your employment.
  • You will get a greater sum if your benefits earned based on your service years exceed these values, regardless of whether you are an employee of the Federal Employees Retirement System or the Civil Service Retirement System.
  • When you reach the age of 62, your benefits package will be decided based on the number of hours you worked from the time your impairment began until the time you reached the age of 62.
  • If you have any further questions concerning disability retirement, you should get advice from a financial advisor.

Federal Disability Retirement benefits for Postal Employees: 5 Lessons Learned

  1. By Robert R.
  2. McGill, Esquire, Attorney at Law It is always risky for ″outsiders″ to pass on lessons acquired to ″insiders,″ especially when the vagaries of deteriorating job circumstances within the United States Postal Service during the previous decade have escalated at exponential warp speed, as has been the case in the past decade.
  3. It is possibly having a more ″objective″ perspective that might be of informative aid to the Postal employee when it comes to the specific area of filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits (and by implication and truncated entrapment, Federal employees who are non-Postal, but under the same system of FERS, CSRS or CSRS Offset).
  4. With that in mind, the lessons that follow should be of assistance to Postal employees who wish to apply for Postal Disability Retirement benefits through the United States Office of Personnel Management.

Unlike the basic eligibility criteria, which can be obtained through more conventional means, the following are the more ″nuanced″ issues that the Postal employee will likely encounter in the course of preparing and formulating a Postal Disability Retirement application, but which may not be as readily accessible or self-evident as the fundamental eligibility criteria.We begin with a question, followed by a response to each of the questions: Will the Postal Service Accommodate Me?The quick answer is, of course, no.Can they or will they be able to perform ″low duty″ services?The general consensus is that, every now and then, a specific Postal Facility may allow for limited duty, and the Postal worker will end up coming in and performing some menial duties that have no direction or purpose, and which are performed without regard for any thoughtfulness on the part of management.

Instead, there will be a piece of paper that identifies the medical limitations, that the named individual will not be lifting more than X-number of pounds, or that the named individual will not be engaging in any single repetition of ergonomically-challenging physical exertion; everyone involved will sign and acknowledge the piece of paper, smile with a joyful, toothy grin, and then promptly forget about it.For want of a better expression, the value of the content is determined by the supply and demand for the paper itself.The Postal Service has discovered that I am no longer capable of performing one or more of the basic parts of my craft duties.When will they take the necessary steps to legally remove me?

The simple answer is: When they feel like it; when they have the time; when the graph on a spectrum and chart is such that it is more trouble to keep a Postal employee on the LWOP status list, which is buried deep within a database of an unencrypted electronic file, than it is to generate a PS Form 50 to initiate a personnel action separating and terminating the Postal employee, then it is.If it looks to management that the local chapter of the Postal Union is more boisterous than the generally mellifluous intonation with which they are comfortable, or in other words, if all other factors are equal, no action will be done.On the other hand, if starting a removal action is less difficult than not starting one, it is possible that a button will be pressed somewhere over the following 12 months, resulting in the cessation of the receipt of those paystubs with zero balance.

  • As a result, the following is the lesson to be learned from all of this: Keep in mind that even if you are enrolled in OWCP and receive benefits such as temporary total disability payments, OWCP is not a retirement system and has never been designed to function as such.
  • Be aware that once those 0-balance paystubs cease to appear in biweekly intervals, the Statute of Limitations for filing a Federal/Postal Disability Retirement Application with the United States Office of Personnel Management begins to ring.
  • The Postal employee is limited to the timeframe of filing for Federal/Postal Disability Retirement benefits within one (1) year of being separated from the Postal Service, unless an exception is granted.
  • Apparently, there is no need to hire an attorney in order to file for Federal Disability Retirement benefits because the Human Resources Shared Services office in Greensboro, North Carolina will send me the ″Blue Book,″ which contains all of the necessary forms, as well as schedule a ″counseling session″ to assist me in navigating the entire application process.
  • Is this correct?
  • Despite the fact that all of above is true, bear the following in mind: First and foremost, don’t expect any sympathy from H.R.

Shared Services if your Postal/Federal disability retirement application is refused in the First Stage of the Administrative/Bureaucratic process of filing for Federal Disability Retirement benefits at the beginning of the process.Nobody there is going to take responsibility for a denied Federal Disability Retirement application; there will be no one to guide you through what went wrong, what documentation was insufficient, and suddenly, the phrase ″you don’t necessarily need an attorney″ will take on a marked tone of indifference and shifting of responsibility, with the echo chamber of unheard voices saying, ″It is not our problem.″…Second, while everyone at H.R.Shared Services is undoubtedly pleasant to be around, they are unqualified to give legal advice on the preparation, formulation, and filing of Federal/Postal Disability Retirement applications and applications for supplemental benefits.In addition, make no mistake: applying for Postal Disability Retirement is a ″legal″ process just like any other, contrary to what H.R.

Shared Services may claim, and certainly contrary to how the U.S.Office of Personnel Management approaches each and every Postal and Federal Disability Retirement application submitted.Final point: Human Resources Shared Services is never able to give advise beyond the look of a ″full″ Postal Disability Retirement document.Yes, they can ensure that each form is properly filled out, signed, and dated, as well as that all necessary forms are included; however, they are unable to express an opinion on the relevance and substantive viability of the application itself, or on the documentary import of any attachments that have been provided.HR Shared Services informed me that I must first file for Social Security benefits before I can file for Postal Disability Retirement benefits.I disagree with this statement.

Is this correct?Short and simple answer is: No.As a result of the incorrect information given by the United States Postal Service, more Postal Disability Retirement applications have been delayed or otherwise left in limbo.Indeed, the United States Office of Personnel Management requires that Social Security Disability benefits be submitted – but solely for the purpose of coordinating any concurrent payments that may be earned if the application for disability benefits has been approved.For the purpose of applying for Postal Disability Retirement benefits, all that the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) asks for and requires is a pro forma submission of a Social Security Disability application, together with a receipt indicating that the application has been filed.

  1. The SSDI will not make a decision until after you file your claim.
  2. Of course, if, during the course of awaiting a decision from OPM, SSDI is actually approved (which is rare, due to the higher standard imposed of ″total disability,″ as opposed to being unable to perform one or more of the essential elements of one’s positional duties), there is a legal argument to be made under Trevan v.
  3. Office of Personnel Management, 69 F.3d 520 (Fed.
  4. Cir.

1995), where the Court stated that ″OPM and the 526.See also id.at 527.Final question: Can I receive Postal Disability Retirement benefits despite the fact that I am receiving VA Disability benefits, even if the basis for my Postal Disability Retirement is the same injuries or medical conditions as the basis for my VA benefits?Can I receive Postal Disability Retirement benefits despite the fact that I am receiving VA Disability benefits?To summarize, the answer is yes.

The long and the short of it is: As a starting point, there is no overlap or coordination of benefits between VA Disability payments and FERS/CSRS Disability Retirement annuity payouts.Second, it is frequently the case that accidents or medical disorders that develop between FERS Postal Disability Retirement and VA Disability concerns are the same or similar.In a Postal Disability Retirement case, ″preexisting conditions″ are not considered (presumably because eligibility requirements mandate that a FERS Disability Retirement applicant have a minimum of 18 months of Federal Service, which means that for at least a year and a half, whether or not the applicant suffered from a VA-related medical condition, that same person was able to perform all of the essential elements of the positional requirements prior to submitting an application for disability retirement).

The Merit Systems Protection Board also stated in Simpkins v.Office of Personnel Management, 2010 MSPB 52, DC-844E-09-0623-I-1, which was decided on March 18, 2010, that ″OPM must consider an award of benefits by the DVA (Department of Veterans Affairs) based on the same medical conditions as the appellant’s disability retirement application…″ As a result, not only may you obtain concurrent payments from the Department of Veterans Affairs for parallel medical problems, as well as under a FERS/CSRS Disability Retirement, but you can also utilize the same medical foundation for both benefits under certain circumstances.In practice, there is usually an increase in the percentage ascribed to disability in the interim – between when one first becomes a Postal employee and when one files for Postal Disability Retirement benefits (again, obviously, for at least a minimum of 18 months); however, to reiterate: the same evidence that was used to obtain a VA Disability rating, or an increase in a prior rating, can be used to obtain Postal Disability Retirement benefits through the same process.In representing Postal employees who are seeking disability retirement benefits, whether under FERS, CSRS or CSRS Offset, we have learnt five important things.Although not the most important or significant of the issues to be addressed, they do represent additional hurdles and obstacles that many Postal employees must overcome in the course of preparing, formulating, and filing an effective Postal Disability Retirement application, which must then be submitted to the United States Office of Personnel Management for final determination – currently with an average ″wait time″ of 4 – 6 months from the time of being assigned a CSA Number at Boyers, IL.

  1. About: I am an attorney that represents Federal and Postal employees from all across the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, in their employment disputes.
  2. For a first telephone consultation, there is no fee; thus, if you believe that you require the services of an attorney for Federal Disability Retirement

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