How To Create Nuget Package?

  1. Create a package using the nuget.exe CLI
  2. The role and structure of the.nuspec file. Once you know what files you want to package, the next step is creating a package manifest in a.nuspec XML file.
  3. Create the.nuspec file. You then edit the file by hand so that it describes the exact content you want in the final package.
  4. Run nuget pack to generate the.nupkg file. Using the project file

You can configure Visual Studio to automatically generate the NuGet package when you build the project.

  1. In Solution Explorer, right-click the project and choose Properties.
  2. In the Package tab, select Generate NuGet package on build.

Sign in to nuget.org with the account that is the current owner of the package.

How do I create a NuGet package in Ubuntu?

You can create a package by running nuget pack command. NuGet generates a identifier-version.nupkg file in your project folder. Once you have a.nupkg file, you publish it to nuget.org using nuget.exe with an API key acquired from nuget.org.

How do I create a nupkg file in NuGet?

nuget.exe pack -IncludeReferencedProjects -properties Configuration=Release Using these options, Nuget will create a.nupkg that includes any referenced packages and projects. The package filename is automatically created, using the format..nupkg

How to test the NuGet package in Visual Studio?

To test the Nuget package, we can create a local feed of Nuget packages in Visual Studio. To create a local feed, create a new folder called MyLocalFeed on any drive. (You can name the folder as you like. I have created the folder on my E: drive.) Then add the Nuget package that was created earlier to this folder.

How do I create a Nuspec file?

4 Answers

  1. navigate to the directory you want to create the file.
  2. download this nuget exe in the directory.
  3. cd to the directory on command line.
  4. use the command ‘nuget spec project.csproj’
  5. check your directory for the generated nuspec file.

How do I create a Nuget package from an existing DLL?

3 Answers

  1. Download the NuGet Package Explorer.
  2. Open the NuGet Package Explorer, select the create a new package.
  3. Add a lib folder on the content tab, and add your dlls file.
  4. Save the package and install it to the project, check if it add references.

How do I create a Nuget package in dotnet command line?

NET Class Library and publish it to nuget.org using the dotnet command-line interface (CLI).

  1. Prerequisites. Install the.
  2. Create a class library project. You can use an existing.
  3. Add package metadata to the project file.
  4. Run the pack command.
  5. Publish the package.
  6. Related video.
  7. Next steps.

How do I create a Nuget package for .NET core?

Create And Publish A. NET Core Class Library Package Into NuGet.org

  1. Step 1 – Create a simple.
  2. Step 2 – Build and Pack your project from Visual Studio.
  3. Step 3 – Register yourself in NuGet.org and Create API Key.
  4. Step 4 – Publish Package into nuget.org from CMD.
  5. Step 5 – Use newly created Package into Another Project.

How do I run a NuGet package?

NuGet Package Manager

  1. In Solution Explorer, right-click References and choose Manage NuGet Packages.
  2. Choose ‘nuget.org’ as the Package source, select the Browse tab, search for Newtonsoft.Json, select that package in the list, and select Install:
  3. Accept any license prompts.

How do I load a NuGet package?

Web portal: use the Upload Package tab on nuget.org

  1. Select Upload on the top menu of nuget.org and browse to the package location.
  2. nuget.org tells you if the package name is available.
  3. If the package name is available, nuget.org opens a Verify section in which you can review the metadata from the package manifest.

What is the difference between NuGet and DLL?

A dll is basically a software component. Nuget is a component library, there you will find all the shared components that you can user for your projects. A nuget package is the way to manage all your dlls, it can install all the required dlls once you build your project.

Where are NuGet packages installed?

The global-packages folder is where NuGet installs any downloaded package.

config, packages are installed to the global-packages folder, then copied into the project’s packages folder.

  • Windows: %userprofile%\.nuget\packages.
  • Mac/Linux: ~/.nuget/packages.
  • How do I add NuGet package to Artifactory?

    To create a local repository for which Artifactory will calculate NuGet package metadata, in the Administration module, go to Repositories | Repositories | Local and select NuGet to be the Package Type.

    Does dotnet pack also build?

    By default, dotnet pack builds the project first. If you wish to avoid this behavior, pass the –no-build option. You can provide MSBuild properties to the dotnet pack command for the packing process. For more information, see NuGet pack target properties and the MSBuild Command-Line Reference.

    How do I push NuGet package to GitHub?

    You can publish a package to GitHub Packages by authenticating with a nuget. config file, or by using the –api-key command line option with your GitHub personal access token (PAT).

    Publishing a package using a nuget. config file

    1. Authenticate to GitHub Packages.
    2. Create a new project.
    3. Package the project.

    How do I add a local NuGet package to my net core project?

    Create a new ‘package source’ to use. Install the. nupkg file into the package source, using nuget add Use dotnet add package Foo -s to install the package.

    This will make all commands be able to use the package:

    1. dotnet add package foo (optionally add -v 1.0. 0 )
    2. dotnet restore.
    3. dotnet run.

    How do I publish a private NuGet package?

    To create a private NuGet Feed, open the Artifacts tab in your project in Azure DevOps and then click on + Create Feed.

    1. Create a new NuGet feed.
    2. Create the NuGet feed.
    3. The NuGet package got published.
    4. Authorize the build service.
    5. Add the NuGet feed as package source.
    6. Install the NuGet package.

    How do I package a Visual Studio project?

    Visual Studio 2019 provides an easy way to package a desktop application by using the Windows Application Packaging Project. In Solution Explorer, right-click the ContosoExpenses solution and choose Add -> New project.

    How to automatically add components from a NuGet package?

  • Select the Settings icon in the Package Manager UI outlined below or use the Tools > Options command and scroll to NuGet Package Manager:
  • Select the Package Sources node:
  • To add a source,select+,edit the name,enter the URL or path in the Source control,and select Update.
  • How to deploy your NuGet packages locally?

    – On nuget.org, select your user name (upper right of the page), then select Manage Packages. – Locate the package you want to unlist under Published and select the trash can icon on the right: – On the subsequent page, clear the box labeled List (package-name) in search results and select Save:

    How to add a NuGet package using dotnet add?

    dotnet nuget add source – Add a NuGet source. The dotnet nuget add source command adds a new package source to your NuGet configuration files. When adding multiple package sources, be careful not to introduce a dependency confusion vulnerability. Path to the package source. The NuGet configuration file ( nuget.config) to use.

    Create NuGet Package

    It’s simply a ZIP file that has been renamed with the *.nupkg extension and whose contents adhere to specific rules; a NuGet package is nothing more than that. It is possible to package such functionality into a component that can be shared with and used by an unlimited number of other developers by using nuget.exe to do so.

    Prerequisites

    • Install Visual Studio 2017 from visualstudio.com and run any.NET-related workloads in it after installation. In the event that a.NET workload is deployed, NuGet capabilities are automatically included in Visual Studio 2017.
    • The nuget.exe command-line interface may be installed by downloading it from nuget.org and adding it to your PATH environment variable.
    • In the event that you do not already have a nuget.org account, sign up for a free account

    Create Project

    • When packaging code, you may either utilize an existing.NET Framework Class Library project or build a new class library project for the code you wish to package. Many important features may be implemented in a professional NuGet package, which can then be used by others to develop apps.
    • However, in this case, we have a straightforward method in a class library project that will output a string to the console

    Select the Project > Properties menu command, then the Application tab from the drop-down menu.Give your package a unique identify by entering it in the Assembly name field.Select the Assembly Information.button, which brings up a dialog box in which you may input additional characteristics that will be included in the manifest when you save it (a.nuspec file).

    Once all of the settings have been configured, the project should be built in Release mode.

    Generate Manifest (.nuspec)

    • The nuget spec command may be used to build an initial.nuspec file from a project using the nuget package. It is only necessary to run nuget spec once to build the initial manifest.
    • When you update the package, you may either make changes to the values in your project or directly edit the manifest.

    Open a command prompt and browse to the project folder that contains the *.csproj file. Then run the following command from the command prompt. NuGet produces a manifest that corresponds to the name of the project, in this example, SuperLogger.nuspec, and stores it in the repository. The manifest also contains replacement tokens, which are likewise included.

    Change Manifest (.nuspec)

    • NuGet generates an error if you attempt to build a package using the default values in your.nuspec file
    • thus, you must modify the following fields before continuing forward. licenseUrl, projectUrl, iconUrl, releaseNotes, and tags are all required.

    For packages intended for public consumption, you must declare the Tags property, as tags aid in the discovery of your package on sites such as nuget.org and the understanding of what it does by other users. During this point, you may also include any other items that you want in the manifest, as described in the.nuspec file reference.

    Create Package

    Nuget pack is a command that allows you to create a new package. NuGet creates a file named identifier-version.nupkg at the root of your project folder.

    Publish Package

    • Once you have created a.nupkg file, you may publish it to nuget.org by running nuget.exe with an API key obtained from nuget.org and entering it in the appropriate field. Nuget.org requires nuget.exe 4.1.0 or above to function properly. To make your package available for distribution, you must complete the procedures outlined below. To begin, log into your nuget.org account, or create a new account if you do not already have one
    • Click on your login, which is located in the top right corner, and then pick API Keys, after which you will be sent to a homepage where you will be asked to create an API key.

    Provide a name for your key, then type * for the Glob pattern, and then click on the **Create button to start the creation process.If you need to recover the access key you produced in the CLI, click Copy once the key has been created.Important: Please save your key in a safe place since you will not be able to replicate it again in the future.If you go back to the API key page, you’ll have to regenerate the key in order to copy it again.

    If you no longer wish to use the CLI to push packages, you may also delete the API key from your system.Run the nuget push command to publish your package to nuget.org, providing your package name and substituting the key value with the API key you obtained from your hosting provider.Because we didn’t supply the licensing information, a warning will appear when you run nuget.exe to display the results of the publishing process; nonetheless, this is perfectly normal.

    Creating a Nuget Package – Step by Step

    The process of creating a Nuget Package is quite basic, although it might be a little intimidating the first time you do it. Using this tutorial, you will be guided through the procedure step by step. Although Microsoft provides extensive documentation on Nuget, we’ve streamlined the procedure here to make it easier to understand.

    Your Project

    An ideal Nuget package would be a.NET Framework Class Library, which can be found here. Our example makes use of a Cinstance, and the package is, for all intents and purposes, a standard class library. If there are any items you wish to include in your package, such as documentation or a readme.md file, these should be included in the project as well.

    Creating a.nuspec File

    The.nuspec file is the most important component of a Nuget package.A package definition file is an XML file that represents your package and provides all of the information that Nuget.org requires in order for your package to be published on their website.Although it is not required, including the.nuspec file in the root of your project makes life a little simpler in some situations.The following is an example of an empty.nuspec file.

    This is the fundamental framework that you may use to build your very first package using.false =″1.0″

    A Real Example – Our ErrLog.IO.Nuspec File

    =″1.0″ errlog.io 1.1.18 errlog.io Matthew Proctor, Michael Sanders, and Alastair Bateman are among the cast members.kutamo erroneous ErrLog.IO is an utility for logging exceptions and errors.Bug fixes and performance enhancements have been included.Kutamo Pty.

    Ltd.has copyright protection for the year 2017.web-based error logging ErrLog.IO is a logging tool for logging exceptions and errors.

    Required.nuspec Elements

    Element Description or Details
    id The case-insensitive package identifier, which must be unique across nuget.org. IDs may not contain spaces or characters that are not valid for a URL, and generally follow.NET namespace rules.
    version The version of the package, following the major.minor.patch pattern. Ensure you update this value for each subsequent package deployment.
    description A long description of the package for UI display – this should be a description of your package and what functionality it provides.
    authors A comma-separated list of packages authors, matching the profile names on nuget.org.

    Useful, but Optional,.nuspec Elements

    Element Description or Details
    title Simply the title of your package, typically used in UI displays as on nuget.org and the Package Manager in Visual Studio. If not specified, the package ID is used.
    projectUrl A URL for your package’s home page, often shown in UI displays as well as nuget.org.
    licenseUrl A URL for your package’s license, if it has one.
    iconUrl A URL for a 64×64 image with transparent background to use as the icon for the package in UI display. This must be a fully qualified URL. If you don’t specify one, your package will have the default Nuget logo.
    releaseNotes A brief description of the changes made in this release of your package.
    copyright Copyright details for your package.

    A large number of extra configuration options are available in the.nuspec file, which are explained here.

    A Picture is Worth a Thousand Pull Requests

    A custom logo is a wonderful way to help distinguish your package from the hundreds of others in the Nuget.org library, and it’s a simple and straightforward process. Logos must be a 64×64 pixel picture with a transparent background and must be included in the logos section of the.nuspec file.nuspec files are available for download here.

    Including a README.MD File

    In order to provide your users with instructions on how to use your package, a readme.md file is a wonderful method to do so. Markdown is used to create this document, which will be displayed in Visual Studio when your package has been downloaded and installed. You may get our readme file by clicking here.

    Building Your Package

    Once you’ve finished creating your.nuspec file, it’s time to start building your package!Nuget.Org provides a program nuget.exe that may be used to bundle your library into a Nuget package, which can be downloaded from their website.If you are using Visual Studio, you should already have this installed; otherwise, you may get it at nuget.org/downloads.Considering that Nuget.exe must be executed from within your project folder, the simplest technique is to drag and drop it into the folder from a command prompt or powershell window.

    cd to the folder containing your project

    Nuget.Exe Package Repository

    If your library makes use of any packages, you’ll need to notify Nuget where those packages may be found on your computer.Using the -Set repositoryPath argument, nuget.exe may be used to do this task.If you’re working with Visual Studio, your packages folder is normally located in the root folder of your Solution folder.The following command: nuget.exe config -Set repositoryPath=″complete path to your packages folder″ We are now able to put together our product.

    To demonstrate, we will set the build settings to ″Release″ in the example below.The following command: nuget.exe pack -IncludeReferencedProjects -properties Configuration=Release Nuget will generate an a.nupkg file that contains all of the referenced packages and projects if you use these arguments.The package filename is generated automatically using the format.nupkg extension.

    In the case of the ErrLog.IO package, the filename is errlog.io.1.1.18.nupkg, which is a recent version of ErrLog.IO.

    Deploying Your Package to Nuget.Org

    Once you’ve finished creating your.nupkg file, you may upload it to Nuget.Org for distribution. For the sake of this tutorial, we are going to assume that you have previously registered for a Nuget.Org account and generated an API Key.

    Uploading a Package Manually

    It is simple to upload your.nupkg file to nuget by going to the website. One single step allows Nuget to open your package, read the.nuspec file, and publish your package to the world.

    Automating and Scripting Deployment

    Nuget.exe provides the capability of uploading your package automatically; as a result, you may design a script to automatically generate and distribute your package with little or no intervention from you.In order to submit your package using nuget.exe, we must first create an API key for the package.A Nuget.Org API key may be generated through the user interface of your Nuget.Org account.nuget.exe configuration setApiKey aaaaaaa-bbbb-cccc-dddd-eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee You may now use Nuget.Exe to submit your package to Nuget.Org after you’ve created an API Key for your package.

    No matter how many times you repeat it, it will always sound odd.nuget.exe push.nupkg is the source code for this program.

    Handy Hint!

    The push command also supports wildcards, so you may use it to push any.nupkg file in the folder with a single command, rather than having to manually choose each one. *.nupkg is being pushed by nuget.exe -Source

    How We Build & Deploy the ErrLog.IO Nuget Package

    The ErrLog.IO Nuget Package is built and deployed automatically through the use of a simple batch file, which we are pleased to share with you below (with a few items obfuscated).REM cd to project folder cd to project folder cd to project folder ErrLogNuget REM Configure Nuget Settings E:ErrLogErrLogNuget nuget config -Set repositoryPath=″E:ErrLogpackages″ nuget setApiKey aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa REM Construct a Nuget package.nuget pack -IncludeReferencedProjects -properties nuget pack -IncludeReferencedProjects Configuration=Release REM Deploy to the Nuget.Org website.nuget push *.nupkg -Source nuget push *.nupkg

    Nuget Statistics

    A pivot table on your Nuget package page provides you with a convenient overview of your package downloads, as well as more detailed information in the form of a pivot table, which allows you to evaluate downloads by version and client type.

    Final Thoughts

    Because you are responsible for testing, it is simple to mistakenly deploy a defective Nuget package for international distribution. If you want to ensure that your users have a positive and bug-free experience, make sure you have a robust testing procedure in place for downloading and verifying your package as soon as it is released.

    References

    • Nuget Documentation
    • Nuget’s.nuspec Reference

    Create and publish a.NET Standard NuGet package – Visual Studio on Windows

    • Continue to the main content This browser is no longer supported by the manufacturer. You may benefit from the newest features, security updates, and technical support by switching to Microsoft Edge from Internet Explorer. Article published on February 2, 2022.
    • It will take you 9 minutes to read this.

    The information you provide will be forwarded to Microsoft: By clicking the submit button, your input will be used to improve Microsoft products and services in the future. Policy on personal information. Thank you very much.

    In this article

    Making a NuGet package from a.NET Standard Class Library in Visual Studio on Windows and publishing it to nuget.org is a straightforward procedure that may be accomplished using a command-line tool.

    Prerequisites

    1. Using a.NET Core-related task, install any edition of Visual Studio 2019 from visualstudio.com.
    2. Install the dotnet CLI, if it hasn’t already been done for you. If you’re looking for the dotnet CLI, you’ll find it automatically installed with any.NET Core-related workloads starting with Visual Studio 2017. Otherwise, you’ll need to install the.NET Core SDK in order to access the dotnet CLI. It is necessary to utilize the dotnet CLI for.NET Standard applications that use the SDK-style format in order to function properly (SDK attribute). The SDK property is utilized by the default.NET Standard class library template in Visual Studio 2017 and above, which is the template that is used in this article. Important If you are working on a project that is not in the SDK style, follow the instructions described Create and publish a.NET Framework package (using Visual Studio) instead of manually creating and publishing the package. The dotnet CLI is suggested for the purposes of this article. Although the nuget.exe CLI may be used to publish any NuGet package, some of the methods in this article are exclusive to SDK-style applications and the dotnet CLI, which you can read about in the next section. This CLI is used for projects that are not SDK-style (usually those that utilize the.NET Framework).
    3. If you don’t already have an account on nuget.org, you may sign up for one for free. When you create a new account, you will receive a confirmation email. Before you may upload a package, you must first validate your account.

    Create a class library project

    In order to package the code you wish to package, you may either leverage an existing.NET Standard Class Library project or construct a basic one as follows:

    1. Create a new project in Visual Studio by selecting File > New > Project, expanding the Visual C>.NET Standard node, selecting the ″Class Library (.NET Standard)″ template, and clicking OK. Tip Unless there is a compelling reason to do otherwise,.NET Standard should be used as the target for NuGet packages since it is compatible with the broadest variety of consuming projects.
    2. To ensure that the project was properly generated, right-click on the resultant project file and pick Build from the context menu. The DLL may be located in the Debug folder (or the Release folder if you want to create the Release configuration instead).

    Of course, you may include many helpful features in a genuine NuGet package that will let others to develop apps using the features you’ve implemented.However, for the purposes of this tour, you will not need to write any extra code because the class library provided by the template will suffice to construct a package.If you still want some functioning code for the package, you may copy and paste the following: Public class Logger in namespace AppLogger public void Log(string text) in public void Logger in namespace AppLogger Console.WriteLine(text); in namespace AppLogger

    Configure package properties

    1. To access the Package tab, right-click the project in Solution Explorer and pick the Properties menu command from the context menu. Visual Studio only displays the Package tab for SDK-style projects, which are typically.NET Standard or.NET Core class library projects
    2. if you are targeting a non-SDK style project (typically.NET Framework), either migrate the project or view the Package tab.NET Framework Instead of step-by-step instructions, create and publish a.NET Framework package.NET Framework package. Note Special attention should be paid to the Tags property in packages intended for public consumption, as tags assist others in finding your package and understanding what it does.
    3. Give your product a unique identification number and fill out any additional attributes that you like. A mapping of MSBuild properties (from an SDK-style project) to properties in a.nuspec can be found in the pack targets section. See the.nuspec file reference for further definitions of the attributes. Almost all of the characteristics shown here are included in the.nuspec manifest that Visual Studio generates for this project. Important You must provide the package an identification that is unique across all of nuget.org or whichever server you are using to distribute it. We recommend using the words ″Sample″ or ″Test″ in the package name for this walkthrough since the subsequent publishing step does make the package publicly available (though it’s doubtful that anybody will actually use it) and because the package will be publicly accessible when it is published. In the event that you try to publish a package with a name that already exists, you will receive an error message.
    4. (Optional) For a more direct view of the properties in the project file, right-click the project in Solution Explorer and select Edit AppLogger.csproj from the context menu. This option is only accessible for projects that make use of the SDK-style property, and it was first introduced in Visual Studio 2017. Otherwise, right-click the project and select Unload Project from the context menu. Then, right-click the unloaded project and choose Edit AppLogger.csproj from the context menu.

    Run the pack command

    1. Release the setup by pressing the Release button.
    2. In Solution Explorer, right-click the project and pick the Pack command from the context menu: It is likely that your project is not an SDK-style project, and you will need to utilize the nuget.exe command-line interface (CLI) to install the required libraries. Either move the project and utilize the dotnet CLI, or look into it more. Instead of providing step-by-step instructions, create and distribute a.NET Framework package instead.
    3. Visual Studio compiles the project and generates the.nupkg file, which is then used by other applications. Examine the details in the Output box (which looks similar to the following), which provides the path to the package file, for further information. Also, keep in mind that the produced assembly is located in binReleasenetstandard2.0, which is appropriate for the.NET Standard 2.0 target. 1> – The construction process began: AppLogger is the name of the project. Setting up the application: Release Any CPU – 1>AppLogger, which is located in the directory d:projAppLoggerAppLoggerAppLoggerbinReleasenetstandard2.0AppLogger.dll in the d:projAppLoggerAppLoggerbinRelease directory. 1>The package ‘d:projAppLoggerAppLoggerbinReleaseAppLogger.1.0.0.nupkg’ was successfully built on the server. ==================================================================================

    (Optional) Generate package on build

    When you create the project, you may set Visual Studio to produce the NuGet package for you, which will save you time.

    1. Right-click the project in Solution Explorer and select Properties from the context menu.
    2. On the Package tab, check the box for Generate NuGet package during construction.

    Note When you automatically produce the package, the time it takes to pack increases the build time for your project, making it more difficult to complete.

    (Optional) pack with MSBuild

    When a project provides the relevant package data, a pack target may be used instead of the Pack menu command with NuGet 4.x and MSBuild 15.1 and later versions of the software.Open a command prompt and go to the folder containing your project files.Then perform the following command.(In most cases, you’ll want to launch the ″Developer Command Prompt for Visual Studio″ from the Start menu, because it will be set with all of the essential MSBuild paths.) For further information, read MSBuild: Create a package for more information.

    Publish the package

    Once you have created an a.nupkg file, you may publish it to nuget.org by using either the nuget.exe CLI or the dotnet.exe CLI, together with an API key obtained from nuget.org, to distribute it to other developers.Note The screening of all packages posted to nuget.org for viruses and rejection of any packages discovered to contain viruses is performed.All of the packages posted on nuget.org are also scanned on a regular basis.Packages that are published to nuget.org are likewise publicly viewable to other developers unless they are explicitly excluded from the list.

    See Hosting packages for information on how to host packages privately.

    Acquire your API key

    1. Sign in to your nuget.org account, or create a new account if you don’t already have one to get started. Individual accounts has more information on how to set up your account.
    2. Select API Keys from the drop-down menu under your user name (located in the top right).
    3. Pick Create, provide a name for your key, and then select Select Scopes > Push to complete the process. Make a note of the * in the Glob pattern field, then click Create. (For further information about scopes, see the section below.)
    4. Once the key has been produced, choose Copy in order to acquire the access key you require in the CLI:

    Warning Always remember to keep your API key hidden!You should treat your API key as if it were a password that allowed anybody to manage packages on behalf of you.If your API key is mistakenly leaked, you should either remove it or get it regenerated.Important Please save your key in a safe place since you will not be able to replicate it again in the future.

    If you go back to the API key page, you’ll have to regenerate the key in order to copy it again.If you no longer want to push packages, you may also delete the API key from your account.Scoping enables you to generate various API keys for different reasons, which you can then reuse.

    Each key has an expiration duration and can be restricted to particular packages based on its scope (or glob patterns).Each key is also limited to a single activity, such as the pushing of new packages and updates, the pushing of just updates, or the delisting of packages.You may use scope to establish API keys for various people that manage packages for your business, ensuring that they only have the rights that they require for their jobs.

    More information may be found at scoped API keys.

    Publish with the dotnet CLI or nuget.exe CLI

    • Choose the tab that corresponds to your CLI tool, such as.NET Core CLI (dotnet CLI) or NuGet (nuget.exe CLI). NuGet
    • the.NET Core command-line interface

    This procedure is advised as an alternative to using nuget.exe in most cases. Prior to publishing the package, you must first open a command line and enter the package’s name.

    1. Alternatively, navigate to the folder containing the.nupkg file.
    2. Enter your package name (unique package ID) and your API key in the following command, substituting the key value with your API key and providing your package name (unique package ID): AppLogger is being pushed by dotnet nuget. 1.0.0.nupkg -api-key qz2jga8pl3dvn2akksyquwcs9ygggg4exypy3bhxy6w6x6 -source
    3. 1.0.0.nupkg -api-key qz2jga8pl3dvn2akksyquwcs9ygggg4exypy3bhxy6w6x6 -source
    4. The following are the outcomes of the publishing procedure displayed by dotnet: info: AppLogger is being pushed. 1.0.0.nupkg to’information: PUTinfo:Created12620ms information: Your package has been pushed.

    See dotnet nuget push for further information. This step can be used instead of the dotnet.exe command.

    1. Open a command prompt and go to the folder that contains the.nupkg file.
    2. Enter your package name (unique package ID) and your API key in the following command, substituting the key value with your API key and providing your package name (unique package ID): AppLogger is pushed via the nuget package manager. 1.0.0.nupkg qz2jga8pl3dvn2akksyquwcs9ygggg4exypy3bhxy6w6x6 -Source: qz2jga8pl3dvn2akksyquwcs9ygggg4exypy3bhxy6w6x6
    3. The following are the outcomes of the publishing procedure displayed by nuget.exe: AppLogger is being pushed. 1.0.0.nupkg was created in 6829 milliseconds. Your cargo was moved to the back of the truck.

    See nuget push.

    Publish errors

    Typically, errors from the push command signal that there is an issue.If you have failed to change the version number in your project, for example, you may be attempting to publish a package that already exists.When you attempt to publish a package with an identity that already exists on the host, you will receive problems as well.For example, the name ″AppLogger″ is already in use by another company.

    When this occurs, the push command returns the following error message: The response status code does not imply that the request was successful: 403 Message: (The supplied API key is invalid or has expired, or it does not have authorization to access the requested package.) In the case when you are using a legitimate API key that you have just established, then this warning implies a name conflict, which is not totally evident from the ″permission″ section of the error message.Attempt to push again after changing the package identification, rebuilding the project, and recreating the.nupkg file, as needed.

    Manage the published package

    You can find the package you just published by going to your profile on nuget.org and selecting Manage Packages.In addition, you will receive a confirmation email.Remember that it may take some time for your package to be indexed and shown in search results, where it may be found by other people.During such period, the following notice appears on your package page: That’s all there is to it!

    You’ve just published your first NuGet package to nuget.org, which other developers may download and use in their own projects.Congratulations on your accomplishment!You should unlist any packages that you produced throughout this tour that aren’t truly helpful (for example, a package built with an empty class library), in order to prevent them from appearing in search results:

    1. On nuget.org, click on your user name (located in the upper right corner of the screen), then click on Manage Packages.
    2. To remove a package from the published section, locate it in the Published section and pick the trash can symbol on the right:
    3. Delete the checkbox labeled List (package-name) in search results on the next screen, and then click Save:

    Adding a readme and other files

    • To define which files should be included in the package directly, modify the project file and include the content property: true in your code. This will include a readme.txt file in the package root with the name readme.txt. Visual Studio shows the contents of the file in plain text as soon as the package is installed directly in Visual Studio. (Readme files for packages that have been installed as dependencies are not displayed.) For example, the following is how the readme file for the HtmlAgilityPack package displays on the computer: Note By just include the readme.txt document at the project’s root directory, it will not be included in the final package that is generated. More NuGet videos may be seen on Channel 9 and YouTube. Packet creation and publication, as well as the creation of pre-release packages
    • Support for various target frameworks
    • package versioning
    • the ability to create translated packages
    • documentation for the.NET Standard Library
    • Porting from the.NET Framework to the.NET Core

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    Creating a Nuget Package

    Nuget Nuget is a package manager for the Microsoft Development Platform that is available for free and open source.It is made available as a Visual Studio extension for Windows.The ability to create and consume packages is provided by the Nuget client toolset.Nuget is currently at version 2.8.5 as of the time of writing this article.

    After creating a class library project that has some extension methods for a string, we will package up these extension methods as a Nuget package and make them available to the public.Let’s get this party started.Requirements Nuget.exe should be downloaded.

    Code To begin, launch Visual Studio and create a class library project named ″CSharpHelpers″ using the Cproject template, with the target framework set to.Net 4.5 as the target framework selection.To do this, create a folder called ″StringHelpers″ and place the ″CustomStringHelpers.cs″ file inside of it.Create a new CustomStringHelpers.cs file and include the following code.(Note: Because we are building extension methods, we need declare the CustomStringHelpers class as a static class.)

    1. Using System
    2. \sUsing System. Security.Cryptography
    3. \sUsing System. Text
    4. \sUsing System.Text.RegularExpressions
    5. \sNamespace CSharpHelpers.StringHelpers
    6. \s    public static class CustomStringHelpers
    7. \s        public static string RemoveSpace(this System.String entity)
    8. \s            return ReplaceParticularCharacter(entity, ″ ″, String.Empty)
    9. \s        public static string RemoveLastCharacter(this System. String entity)
    10. \s            return String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(entity) ? String.Empty : entity. Remove((entity.Length – 1), 1)
    11. \s        public static string RemoveFirstCharacter(this System.String entity)
    12. \s            return String. IsNullOrWhiteSpace(entity) ? String.Empty : entity. Remove(0, 1)
    13. \s        public static string ToString(this System.String entities, string separator, bool trim = false)
    14. \s            StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder()
    15. \s            foreach (var item in entities)
    16. \s                str.Append(trim ? (item.Trim() + separator) : (item + separator))
    17. \s            return str. ToString(). RemoveLastCharacter()
    18. \s        public static string ReplaceParticularCharacter(this System.String entity, string oldCharacter, string newCharacter)
    19. \s            return entity. Replace(oldCharacter, newCharacter)
    20. \s        public static string CreateMd5Hash(this System. String entity)
    21. \s            var md5Hash = MD5.Create()
    22. \s            byte data = md5Hash.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(entity))
    23. \s            StringBuilder sBuilder = new StringBuilder()
    24. \s            foreach (byte t in data)
    25. \s                sBuilder.Append(t.ToString(″x2″))
    26. \s            return sBuilder.ToString()
    27. \s        public static string ToSeoSlug(this System.String entity)
    28. \s            var str = entity. ReplaceParticularCharacter(″&″, ″and″)
    29. \s            Regex rgx = new Regex(″\\W″)
    30. \s            Regex rgx1 = new Regex(″+″)
    31. \s            var removeMultipleDash = rgx1. Replace(rgx. Replace(str, ″-″), ″-″)
    32. \s            var removeFirstDash = removeMultipleDash.StartsWith(″-″) ? removeMultipleDash. RemoveFirstCharacter() : removeMultipleDash
    33. \s            var removeLastDash = removeFirstDash. EndsWith(″-″) ? removeFirstDash. RemoveLastCharacter() : removeFirstDash
    34. \s            return removeLastDash. ToLower()
    • Creating a Nuget package is simple. To begin the process of creating a package, we must first generate the.nuspec file. This is a manifest file that contains information about the package in XML format. Following the construction of a package, this manifest file is included in the package as well as saved in the package itself (see below). Using a command terminal, use the following command to generate the this.nuspec configuration file: Nuget.exe specification When we run the preceding command at a command prompt, we will receive a success message similar to the one displayed in (F:1). Create a Manifest File Using This Command (F:1) This file is known as Package.nuspec and is the default name for the manifest file. (I have generated a copy of this file on my desktop and called it NugetSpec.nuspec to distinguish it from the original.) Copy this manifest file and paste it into our class library project’s manifests directory. Let’s look at the content of the file by opening it in Visual Studio. The contents of the manifest file are presented in the following example: (F:2). The Manifest File’s Contents (F:2) Let’s take a look at each and every element in the file one by one. id: An identification for the package that is unique to it is provided here. In Visual Studio, the name of the package is what is used when the package is installed using the Install-package command in the Package Manager interface of the Visual Studio environment. The Package Id follows the same rules as the a.Net namespace in terms of structure. For example, the package id Mvc.Helper is an acceptable package identifier.
    • 1.0.0, for example
    • authors: a comma-separated list of the package’s authors
    • version: the package’s version number, such as 1.0.0
    • description: the package’s description.
    • Owners: This is a comma separated list of the people that created the package. The most of the time, it’s the same as the package writers
    • LicenseUrl: This is a hyperlink to the license under which the package is distributed. Take, for example, the Apache license.
    • A connection to the project’s home page is provided by ProjectUrl. If the project is open-source, the URL for the project source code, such as the Github project URL, can be used.
    • In this case, the iconUrl specifies a URL to an image that will be used as the package’s icon. The picture should be a 32×32 pixel png file with a transparent backdrop
    • the image should be 32×32 pixels.
    • Whether or not the Nuget client must guarantee that the package license (provided by licenseUrl) is approved by the user before installing the package is indicated by the boolean value requireLicenseAcceptance.
    • Detailed description of the package
    • as the name implies, this is a lengthy description.
    • A summary of the modifications that have been made in each release of the package is contained inside ReleaseNotes.
    • Make a note of any copyright restrictions that apply to the package.
    • Package Tags: This is a collection of keywords that are separated by commas that characterize the package. These tags come in handy when a user is trying to locate a certain package.
    • Dependencies: This element gives the list of other Nuget packages that are dependant on our package and that must be installed in order for our package to function properly.
    • The package’s title is intended to be simple and easy to remember. If no package id is supplied, the package id is used. It is not included in the manifest file by default because it is not a required element.
    • Files: This element is used to specify the content of the package in which it is contained. It is not included in the manifest file by default because it is not a required element.
    • Now, let’s fill in the blanks in the package manifest file with the appropriate information. The contents of the revised manifest file are presented in the following table (F:3). Manifest File Content has been updated (F:3) Please keep in mind that the source code for this example has been uploaded to my Github repository. The manifest file contains the URL of my Github project, which I have used as the project URL. In addition, I have included the License document in the source code. Contents of the Nuget Package In order to define the contents of a Nuget package, either a traditional folder structure relative to the package manifest file or a files element in the package manifest file must be defined in the package manifest file. The convention-based method necessitates the use of the following folder hierarchy: PowerShell scripts and applications are stored in the tools folder of a package, which is accessible through the Package Manager Console.
    • When the package is installed, assembly references for the assemblies (DLL files) in the lib folder are added as assembly references.
    • When the package is installed, the files included within the content folder are copied straight to the root of the application’s directory. For example, if we wish to add a script file to the /Scripts folder of the target application, we must place that script file inside the Content/Scripts/ directory.

    Now, let’s look at how to construct a package using the Convention-based method, and then we’ll look at how to create a package using the files element included within the manifest file.To Create A Nuget Package, Use A Convention-Based Approach: If you want to construct a package using the Convention-based method, then create a new folder named ″CSharpHelpersPackage″ and then place the manifest file we prepared in the earlier steps in that folder.In order to make use of our extension methods, we must first include a reference to our DLL in the target application’s code.Let’s create a new folder named lib and place our class library project’s DLL (CSharpHelpers.dll) in it (Note: Make sure to copy the DLL from the bin/Release location to this new folder).

    In addition, let’s provide a read me file that lists the extension methods that are included in our package.This file will be opened when the package has been successfully installed in the target program.The following are the contents of the CSharpHelpersPackage folder: (F:4).

    Content of the CSharpHelpersPackage Directory (F:4) It is now necessary to put together the package.The following command should be entered into a command line to generate the Nuget package : Nuget.exe is a software package.NugetSpec.nuspec Following the execution of the above command on a command prompt, we will receive the message seen in the following image (F:5).

    Use of Convention-Based Approach for Nuget Package Construction (F:5) According to the message, the Nuget package is successfully produced, however there is a warning that the assembly ″is not located within a framework folder.″ The answer to this warning is also offered in the same warning message, which states that we must transfer the assembly into a framework-specific folder in order to address the problem.When we install a Nuget package, it first detects the framework of the target application and then attempts to locate the proper assembly in the lib folder of the installation directory.When we were developing our class library project, we chose the following framework as the target framework.

    • net45 is the version of Net that is used, therefore create a new folder named net45 inside the lib folder and copy the CSharpHelpers.dll into the net45 folder.
    • NET45 is an acronym for the network of 45 computers.
    • Net framework version 4.5.
    1. For additional information about the common framework and its acronym, please see this page.
    2. Let us now attempt to generate the package a second time.
    3. This time, after executing the command, we will receive a success message, as seen in the following example (F:6).
    1. Created The Nuget package employs a convention-based approach to development (F:6) Great!
    2. Using the convention-based technique, we are able to generate a Nuget package for distribution.
    3. Consider the following scenario: you want to construct a package by including a files element in the manifest file.
    4. Generate a Nuget package by referencing the files element in the Manifest file.
    5. Add the following code to the manifest file after the metadata element in order to generate the package using the files element in the manifest file.

    After that, we’ll look at how to construct a package using the Convention-based method.After that, we’ll look at how to create a package using the files element in the manifest file.Nuget Package Creation Using a Convention-Based Approach: If you want to construct a package using the Convention-based method, first create a new folder named ″CSharpHelpersPackage″ and then place the manifest file, which we prepared before, in that folder.We must provide a reference to our DLL in the target program in order to make use of our extension methods.

    To do this, let’s create a new folder named lib and place our class library project’s DLL (CSharpHelpers.dll) in that folder (Note: Make sure to transfer the DLL from the bin/Release directory).In addition, let’s create a readme file that lists the extension methods that are included in our package.After the package has been installed in the target application, this file will be shown.

    In the CSharpHelpersPackage folder, you will find the following files: (F:4).Package Directory Content for the CSharpHelpers framework (F:4) It’s now time to put together the package you’ve been working on.The following command should be entered into a command line to generate the Nuget package: It is possible to download the Nuget.exe package.

    NugetSpec.nuspec When we run the previous command at a command prompt, we will receive the message seen in the following image (F:5).Convention-Based Approach for Nuget Package Development (F:5) It appears that the Nuget package has been properly produced, yet there is a warning that the assembly ″Assembly not within a framework folder.″ The answer to this warning is also offered in the same warning message, which states that we must transfer the assembly into a framework-specific folder in order to address the warning message.Nuget packages detect the framework of the target application and attempt to locate the relevant assembly inside the lib folder when they are installed using Nuget packages.

    • Our class library project was created using the target framework as our selection.
    • net45 is the version of Net that is used, therefore create a new folder named net45 inside the lib folder and copy the CSharpHelpers.dll into the net45 folder.
    • The acronym for this is net45.
    1. It is necessary to have the Net Framework 4.5 installed on your computer.
    2. Please see the following link for further information on the common framework and its abbreviation: Take another shot at creating the package now, okay?
    3. As illustrated in the following image, we will receive a success message this time after executing the command (F:6).
    1. Created It is possible to use a convention-based approach with the Nuget package (F:6) Great!
    2. Using the convention-based technique, we are able to generate a Nuget package.
    3. Consider the following scenario: you want to construct a package by including a files element in your manifest file.
    4. Generate a Nuget package by referencing the files element in the manifest file.
    5. The following code should be included to the manifest file after the metadata element in order to generate a package that is based on the files element in it.
    1. Using System
    2. \sUsing CSharpHelpers.StringHelpers
    3. \sNamespace ConsoleApplication1
    4. \s    internal class Program
    5. \s        private static void Main(string args)
    6. \s            var str = ″How to create a nuget package″
    7. \s            Console.WriteLine(str.RemoveSpace())
    8. \s            Console.ReadKey()

    The code that comes before it makes advantage of the RemoveSpace extension function to remove the space from the str constant.Let’s now run the program to see what the results are.The result is seen in the following example: (F:13).Results from the Console Application (F:13) In the previous picture, you can see that the string variable has been cleaned up of any unnecessary spaces.

    Great!After successfully creating and testing our Nuget package, we can go on to the next step.Conclusion In this post, we will learn how to develop a Nuget package and then test it by generating a local feed of Nuget packages to use as a reference.

    I hope you found the article to be interesting.Good luck with your code.

    Create and publish a.NET Framework NuGet package using Visual Studio on Windows

    • Continue to the main content This browser is no longer supported by the manufacturer. You may benefit from the newest features, security updates, and technical support by switching to Microsoft Edge from Internet Explorer. Article published on January 25, 2021.
    • It takes 8 minutes to read

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    In this article

    A NuGet package from a.NET Framework Class Library is created by first building the DLL in Visual Studio for Windows, followed by using the nuget.exe command line tool to generate and publish the package in the NuGet repository.Note Note that this Quickstart is only applicable to Visual Studio 2017 and higher versions running on Windows.The functionalities detailed here are not included in Visual Studio for Mac 10.4 or later.Instead, make use of the dotnet CLI tools.

    Prerequisites

    1. Installation of Visual Studio 2017 or above from visualstudio.com with any.NET-related workload is supported under the free trial. When a.NET workload is installed, NuGet capabilities are immediately included in Visual Studio 2017.
    2. Install the nuget.exe command-line interface (CLI) by downloading it from nuget.org, storing it to an appropriate location, and adding that folder to your PATH environment variable.
    3. If you don’t already have an account on nuget.org, you may sign up for one for free. When you create a new account, you will receive a confirmation email. Before you may upload a package, you must first validate your account.

    Create a class library project

    Use an existing.NET Framework Class Library project for the code you wish to package, or construct a basic one using the steps outlined in this section:

    1. Choose File > New > Project in Visual Studio, choose the Visual Cnode, select the ″Class Library (.NET Framework)″ template, name the project AppLogger, and then click OK.
    2. To ensure that the project was properly generated, right-click on the resultant project file and pick Build from the context menu. The DLL may be located in the Debug folder (or the Release folder if you want to create the Release configuration instead).

    Of course, you may include many helpful features in a genuine NuGet package that will let others to develop apps using the features you’ve implemented.You may also customize the target frameworks in any way you like.For example, have a look at the tutorials for Windows 10 and Xamarin.However, for the purposes of this tour, you will not need to write any extra code because the class library provided by the template will suffice to construct a package.

    If you still want some functioning code for the package, you may copy and paste the following: making use of System; namespace AppLogger public class Logger public void Log(string text) Console.WriteLine(text); namespace AppLogger public class Logger; namespace AppLogger

    Configure project properties for the package

    It is possible to install NuGet packages through their manifest (a.nuspec file), which provides relevant metadata such as the package identification and version number as well as a description and other information.Some of these may be derived directly from the project properties, which saves the time and effort of having to change them in both the project and the manifest individually.This section covers how to set the appropriate attributes in the appropriate places.

    1. Select the Project > Properties menu command, then the Application tab from the drop-down menu.
    2. Give your package a unique identify by entering it in the Assembly name field. Important You must provide the package an identification that is unique across all of nuget.org or whichever server you are using to distribute it. We recommend using the words ″Sample″ or ″Test″ in the package name for this walkthrough since the subsequent publishing step does make the package publicly available (though it’s doubtful that anybody will actually use it) and because the package will be publicly accessible when it is published. In the event that you try to publish a package with a name that already exists, you will receive an error message.
    3. Select the Assembly Information. button, which brings up a dialog box in which you may input additional characteristics that will be included in the manifest when you save it (see.nuspec file reference – replacement tokens). The most often used fields are Title, Description, Company, Copyright, and Assembly version, which are listed in alphabetical order. These properties will be displayed alongside your package on a hosting site such as nuget.org, so make sure they are completely descriptive.
    4. Alternatively, you may see and update the properties directly by opening the Properties/AssemblyInfo.cs file within the project.
    5. As soon as the properties have been set, change the project configuration to Release and rebuild the project to generate the updated DLL.

    Generate the initial manifest

    You now have a DLL in your possession, as well as project attributes that you may utilize to produce an initial.nuspec file from the project.Included in this phase are the replacement tokens that will be used to extract information from the project file.You just need to run nuget spec once to produce the first version of the manifest.When you update the package, you may either make changes to the values in your project or directly edit the manifest.

    1. Open a command prompt and go to the folder containing the AppLogger.csproj file in the project folder.
    2. Run the following command to find out more: nuget spec is an abbreviation for nuget specification. AppLogger.csproj. NuGet produces a manifest that corresponds to the name of the project specified, in this instance AppLogger.nuspec, when a project is specified. Additionally, replacement tokens are included in the manifest.
    3. To investigate the contents of AppLogger.nuspec, open it in a text editor and type the following into the text box: Package 1.0.0 has the following features: YourUsername MIT is your user name. false Description of the package The following is a list of the modifications made in this version of the package. Copyright 2019 Tag1 Tag2
    4. Copyright 2019 Tag3

    Edit the manifest

    1. If you attempt to build a package with default values in your.nuspec file, NuGet will generate an error, and you will need to make changes to the following fields before proceeding. For a discussion of how these optional metadata components are used, see the.nuspec file reference – optional metadata elements. licenseUrl, projectUrl, iconUrl, releaseNotes, and tags are all required.

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