What Is The Zip Code For Lancaster Ca?

Zip Code 93534 – Lancaster CA California, USA – Los Angeles County Home | Products | Learn About

What is the zip code for West Lancaster California?

ZIP Code 93534 Map, Demographics, More for Lancaster, CA.

What is the poorest zip code in California?

List of 25 Poorest Zipcodes in California
Rank Zipcode Adjusted Gross Income
1 92401 $25270
2 93701 $26010
3 95585 $27210

Is Lancaster CA on the San Andreas Fault?

Here in the Antelope Valley, we sit on top of the largest known fault line in the state, the San Andreas fault (you can see it from Highway 14, just north of Avenue S, where the freeway cuts through it – look for the heavily swirled rock patterns).

Is Lancaster CA a desert?

Lancaster, city, Los Angeles county, southwestern California, U.S. Lying in Antelope Valley at the western edge of the Mojave Desert, it is 80 miles (130 km) north of the city of Los Angeles and separated from it by the San Gabriel Mountains.

Is Lancaster CA considered high desert?

Lancaster, the largest city in the High Desert, is located in the Antelope Valley next to Palmdale and anchors the area’s largest and most populous region with a metro area of just over 500,000.

What is the poorest area in California?

Orange Cove was ranked the poorest town in California in a 24/7 Wall St.

Orange Cove ranks the poorest of California towns, study finds.

State California
Median Household Income $25,660
Poverty Rate 47.8%
Median Home Value $129,000
Population 9,564

What are the poorest ZIP codes in America?

10 poorest zip codes in America

  1. Zip code: 15929 │ East Wheatfield, Pennsylvania.
  2. Zip code: 97414 │ Broadbent, Oregon.
  3. Zip code: 44503 │ Youngstown, Ohio.
  4. Zip code: 86029 │ Sun Valley, Arizona.
  5. Zip code: 16501 │ Erie, Pennsylvania.
  6. Zip code: 62523 │ Decatur, Illinois.
  7. Zip code: 44702 │ Canton, Ohio.

Are there poor people in Orange County?

By federal criteria, Orange County’s poverty rate has risen to 13.5 percent of residents from 8.8 percent in the past nine years. For a family of four, that means an annual income below $24,000. But Orange County’s cost of living is 46 percent higher than the national average.

What cities are near Lancaster California?

Cities close to Lancaster, CA. Cities, towns and suburbs near Lancaster. San Bernardino: 102 kilometers (63 miles), Orange: 105 kilometers (65 miles), Riverside: 107 kilometers (67 miles). Cities / towns / suburbs around Lancaster. Kilometers.

What is the closest city to Lancaster, California?

What are the closest cities near Lancaster, CA? 18 miles SE Palmdale California, 93550 18.5 miles SW Acton California, 93510 20.4 miles SE Littlerock California, 93543 21.9 miles SW Lake Hughes California, 93532 22.9 miles NE Edwards California, 93523 24.2 miles NW Mojave California, 93501 24.2 miles SE

What is in Lancaster CA?

The largest industries in Lancaster, CA are Health Care & Social Assistance (9,078 people), Retail Trade (7,053 people), and Manufacturing (6,422 people), and the highest paying industries are Utilities ($75,486), Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction ($70,750), and Public Administration ($63,950).

ZIP Code 93534 Map, Demographics, More for Lancaster, CA

Post Office City: Lancaster, CA (View All Cities)
County: Los Angeles County
Timezone: Pacific (11:36pm)
Area code: 661 (Area Code Map)
Coordinates: 34.7, -118.2ZIP (~7 mile radius)

Cities in ZIP code 93534

ZIP Code 93534 is associated with the cities listed below.The cities listed below are those where the US Post Office receives mail.It is possible that the desired city is not the same as the city in which the ZIP code is situated.The main post office in the zip code 93534 is commonly referred to as the city.Always mention the preferred or acceptable cities in the body of your package or letter when shipping it.If you choose a city from the list of prohibited cities, you may experience delays.

Primary or preferred location: Lancaster (California) Del Sur, Fairmont, Hi Vista, Lane, and Wilsona Gardens are all unacceptable.

Stats and Demographics for the 93534 ZIP Code

Southern California’s ZIP code 93534 has a somewhat smaller than average land area compared to other ZIP codes in the United States.It also has a slightly higher than average population density.It also has a population density that is somewhat greater than the national average.The majority of the people that live in ZIP code 93534 are Caucasian.Individuals in their late 20s to early 40s constitute an extraordinarily substantial proportion of the population, as is the proportion of young adults.Aside from that, there is an extraordinarily high proportion of single parents and an exceedingly low proportion of families.

When compared to other locations of the country, the 93534 ZIP code has a disproportionately high percentage of children under the age of 18.

Population 39,341
Population Density 2,215 people per sq mi
Housing Units 16,066
Median Home Value $131,800
Land Area 17.76 sq mi
Water Area 0.40 sq mi
Occupied Housing Units 14,038
Median Household Income $35,892

Estimated Population over Time

Total Population by Age

Median Age: 31 Male Median Age: 30 Female Median Age: 32
Male Female Total
Under 5 1,654 1,720 3,374
5-9 1,505 1,438 2,943
10-14 1,464 1,462 2,926
15-19 1,492 1,706 3,198
20-24 1,741 1,819 3,560
25-29 1,525 1,560 3,085
30-34 1,142 1,294 2,436
35-39 1,010 1,208 2,218
40-44 1,159 1,145 2,304
45-49 1,268 1,379 2,647
50-54 1,208 1,289 2,497
55-59 913 1,027 1,940
60-64 719 877 1,596
65-69 538 692 1,230
70-74 396 637 1,033
75-79 337 496 833
80-84 311 446 757
85 Plus 219 545 764

Gender

 Male 18,601 47%
 Female 20,740 53%

Race

 White 19,639 49.9%
 Black Or African American 8,618 21.9%
 American Indian Or Alaskan Native 469 1.2%
 Asian 1,414 3.6%
 Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander 78 0.2%
 Other Race 6,961 17.7%
 Two Or More Races 2,162 5.5%

Head of Household by Age

Owner Renter Total
15-24 97 1,045 1,142
25-34 554 1,936 2,490
35-44 916 1,479 2,395
45-54 1,338 1,553 2,891
55-64 1,053 1,117 2,170
65-74 709 766 1,475
75-84 591 463 1,054
85 Plus 217 204 421

Families vs Singles

 Husband Wife Family Households 4,888 35%
 Single Guardian 3,850 27%
 Singles 4,260 30%
 Singles With Roommate 1,040 7%

Households with Kids

Average Household Size: 3
 Households without Kids 8,664 62%
 Households with Kids 5,374 38%

Children by Age

Male Female Total
1 304 388 692
2 388 380 768
3 299 317 616
4 295 292 587
5 331 307 638
6 293 300 593
7 296 256 552
8 281 273 554
9 304 302 606
10 277 302 579
11 307 268 575
12 281 296 577
13 289 287 576
14 310 309 619
15 308 345 653
16 281 320 601
17 283 335 618
18 316 343 659
19 304 363 667
20 322 364 686

Real Estate and Housing

The percentage of vacant housing units in ZIP code 93534 is somewhat lower than the national average.In addition, according to the Census, there are one or more correctional institutions and nursing homes in the vicinity.Households are rented to the greatest extent possible.The majority of the homes in ZIP code 93534 were constructed in the 1980s or the 1950s.According to real estate statistics in 93534, the typical house value is $131,800, which is somewhat less than the national average when compared to the rest of the nation.It is also low when compared to other ZIP codes in the area.

When compared to adjacent locations, the zip code 93534 may be a good place to hunt for affordable homes.The most popular types of rental homes in 93534 are 2 bedrooms.The average rent for a two-bedroom apartment is $750-$999 per month, including utilities.One-bedroom apartments are also available, with rent ranging from $750-$999 per month.

  1. For rental property in the ZIP code 93534, the prices range from apartments to townhouses to single-family homes that are used as primary residences.
  2. For additional information, examine the housing prices in Lancaster, California.

Housing Type

 In Occupied Housing Units 38,401 97.6%
 Correctional Facility For Adults 22 0.1%
 Juvenile Facilities 26 0.1%
 Nursing Facilities 465 1.2%
 Other Institutional 0.0%
 College Student Housing 0.0%
 Military Quarters 0.0%
 Other Noninstitutional 427 1.1%

Housing Occupancy

 Owned Households With A Mortgage 4,209 26%
 Owned Households Free & Clear 1,266 8%
 Renter Occupied Households 8,563 53%
 Households Vacant 2,028 13%

Vacancy Reasons

 For Rent 1,163 57.3%
 Rented & Unoccupied 50 2.5%
 For Sale Only 238 11.7%
 Sold & Unoccupied 48 2.4%
 For Season Recreational Or Occasional Use 60 3.0%
 For Migrant Workers 1 0.0%
 Vacant For Other Reasons 468 23.1%

Owner Occupied Home Values

Rental Properties by Number of Rooms

Rental Properties by Number of Rooms

 Studio Apartment 219 2%
 1 Bedroom 2,660 30%
 2 Bedroom 3,398 38%
 3+ Bedroom 2,561 29%

Cost of Monthly Rent Including Utilities

Cost of a Studio Apartment

Employment, Income, Earnings, and Work

When compared to the rest of the country, the median household income in the state is $35,892.It is also compared to ZIP codes in the surrounding area.Even if money isn’t everything, inhabitants of ZIP code 93534 earn significantly less than their counterparts in other regions of town.Similarly to most other sections of the country, cars are the most popular mode of transportation to and from places of employment.In most sections of the nation, the vast majority of commuters arrive at their places of employment in less than half an hour.In 93534, the vast majority of commuters may anticipate to fall inside that range.

Employees in most sections of the nation are significantly more likely than in other parts of the country to have to drive more than 45 minutes to their place of employment, which might imply heavy traffic or that individuals often live a long distance from their place of employment.

Employment Status

 Worked Full-time with Earnings 9,670 32%
 Worked Part-time with Earnings 6,179 20%
 No Earnings 14,311 47%

Average Household Income over Time

Annual Individual Earnings

Sources of Household Income

Percent of Households Receiving Income

Average Income per Household by Income Source

* Only taxable income is included in this calculation.

Household Investment Income

Percent of Households Receiving Investment Income

Average Income per Household by Income Source

There is no reporting of non-taxable income.

Household Retirement Income

Percent of Households Receiving Retirement Income

Average Income per Household by Income Source

* Only taxable income is included in the calculation.

Source of Earnings

 Worked Full-time with Earnings 9,670 32%
 Worked Part-time with Earnings 6,179 20%
 No Earnings 14,311 47%

Means Of Transportation To Work for Workers 16 and Over

Means Of Transportation To Work for Workers 16 and Over

 Car, truck, or van 11,963 89.5%
 Public transportation 410 3.1%
 Taxicab 0.0%
 Motorcycle 43 0.3%
 Bicycle, Walked, or Other Means 520 3.9%
 Worked at Home 436 3.3%

Travel Time to Work (In Minutes)

Schools and Education

The proportion of persons who did not complete high school is among the highest in the country.. However, despite lower high school graduation rates when compared to other ZIP codes, a significantly larger percentage of the population has obtained a college degree.

Educational Attainment For The Population 25 Years And Over

Educational Attainment For The Population 25 Years And Over

 Less than High School Diploma 5,072 20.6%
 High School Graduate 14,240 58.0%
 Associate’s degree 2,148 8.7%
 Bachelor’s degree 2,162 8.8%
 Master’s degree 691 2.8%
 Professional school degree 151 0.6%
 Doctorate degree 102 0.4%

School Enrollment (Ages 3 to 17)

School Enrollment (Ages 3 to 17)

 Enrolled in Public School 6,775 77.5%
 Enrolled in Private School 499 5.7%
 Not Enrolled in School 1,463 16.7%

Schools in ZIP Code 93534

A number of school districts serve the residents of ZIP code 93534, including Lancaster Elementary School District, Antelope Valley Union High School District, and private schools.With postal addresses in ZIP code 93534, there are a total of 15 different elementary schools and high schools to choose from.Desert View Elementary School is located at 1555 West Avenue H-10 in Lancaster, California 93534.The Lancaster Elementary School District is divided into two divisions: primary and elementary.Mariposa Elementary School is located at 737 West Avenue H-6 in Lancaster, California 93534.The Lancaster Elementary School District is divided into two divisions: primary and elementary.

Monte Vista Elementary School is located at 1235 W.Kettering St.in Lancaster, California 93534.The Lancaster Elementary School District is divided into two divisions: primary and elementary.

  1. Sierra Elementary School is located at 747 West Avenue J-12 in Lancaster, California 93534.
  2. The Lancaster Elementary School District is divided into two divisions: primary and elementary.
  3. Sunnydale Elementary School is located at 1233 West Avenue J-8 in Lancaster, California.

Level of education: Primary/Elementary District: Lancaster Elementary School District Crossroads Community Day is held at 44310 Hardwood Ave.in Lancaster, California 93534.The Lancaster Elementary School District is divided into two divisions: primary and elementary.

  1. Desert Sands Charter is located at 44130 20th St.
  2. W.
  3. in Lancaster, California 93534.
  4. Level of education: high school/secondary district: Antelope Valley Union High School District

Be Ready!

  • Despite the fact that disaster preparedness is essential, many of us put it off until it is too late. People frequently claim arguments such as ″it won’t happen here,″ ″things won’t be that awful,″ and ″it’s so costly, I just don’t have the money″ as justifications for not being prepared in the event of a disaster today. As a result, we are perched above the San Andreas fault line, which is the state’s most significant known fault line (you can see it from Highway 14, just north of Avenue S, where the highway cuts over it – look for the extensively swirling rock formations). It is exceedingly rare for the piece of the fault where we reside to move as freely as the rest of the fault, and this area is referred to as the ″Big Bend.″ Furthermore, while the northern part of the fault (the San Francisco region) has had multiple huge earthquakes in recent history, the most recent of which being the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, the southern segment is thought to be 150 years overdue for a major quake. In Southern California, a significant earthquake will cut off utilities, cause transportation and supply lines to be disrupted and disrupted, trigger several thousand building fires, inflict severe structural damage throughout the region, and divide families for many weeks, if not months. Emergency personnel and supplies will be stretched to their limits, and there will be insufficient amounts of both. Earthquakes, on the other hand, are not the only natural calamities that we confront. Windstorms and rainstorms, flooding, blizzards (such as the one that hit the United States in December 2008), fire, terrorist acts, heat waves, and the list goes on and on. Despite the fact that some of these events are short-lived and pass fast, and that they may not appear to be ″disasters,″ they can all have the same long-term consequences: Utilities are cut off, supply lines are interrupted, transportation is difficult, medical emergencies occur, significant traffic crashes occur, and property damage, injuries, and deaths occur. Are you beginning to be concerned? Good. Now, here’s the good news: getting ready isn’t as difficult as you would imagine. No matter how mild the tragedy, a well-prepared earthquake supply bag will be useful for almost every other form of emergency situation. A few simple materials are all that is required to make the difference between helpless terror and assured assurance during an emergency. This list has been divided into two categories for your convenience. Take your time to read it through. Don’t forget that performing even a small amount of work each month is considerably preferable to doing nothing at all. Supplies It might appear expensive to put together a disaster pack all at once, especially for households with many members. When you factor in the fact that you should have three kits – one for your house, one for your car, and one for work – the expense might seem daunting. However, by purchasing one to three goods every month, you may break it down and make it more doable for your budget in the long run. We’ve recommended which goods you should purchase together in order to reduce the monthly cost as low as possible. If you have the resources, make this a weekly guide rather than a monthly one, so that you may be completely prepared that much sooner in the future. Month 1: Water – one gallon per person per day for 3-5 days (if you have a four-person family, this amounts to 12-20 gallons)
  • Month 2: Water – one gallon per person per day for 3-5 days
  • Month 3: Water – one gallon per person per day for 3-5 days
  • Month 4: Water – one gallon per person per day for 3-5 days
  • Month 5: Water – one gallon per person per day for 3-5 days
  • Month 6: Water
  • Spare prescription medication – ask your doctor for samples or an additional prescription, and store the excess in your kit
  • replace it with new medication on a monthly basis.
  • A spare pair of eyeglasses – when you acquire a new pair, place the old pair (in a protective case!) in your kit
  • if you have dentures, do the same thing if you can.
    Month 2

  • First aid kit
  • Utility wrench (for shutting off gas)
  • Month three is a month of rest. Canned foods, granola bars, jerky, ″disaster food″ bars, and other ″comfort″ foods such as cookies or candies – enough for 3-5 days
  • nonperishable food, preferably that does not require cooking, such as canned foods, granola bars, jerky, disaster food bars, and so on
  • Can opener that is operated by hand
  • In the fourth month, a portable AM/FM radio (either powered by batteries or by solar power or a hand crank)
  • If necessary, have extra batteries on hand.
  • Sunscreen
  • Sodium hypochlorite (for purifying water from non-bottled sources)
  • Bleach
  • A flashlight for each member of the family (these don’t have to be expensive and can often be found for as little as a dollar)
  • a flashlight for each member of the family (these don’t have to be expensive and can frequently be found for as little as a dollar)
  • Batteries in reserve
  • Diapers, wipes, formula, and other baby/toddler care supplies (where required) are also included.
  • Supplies for females (if any are available)
  • Monthly clothing exchanges for each person (they might be older, worn-out garments): Month 6 Put them in your kit instead of throwing them away or giving them (be sure to cycle them as your children grow! )
  • don’t forget to include socks and underwear.
  • Walking shoes or boots that are comfortable and durable — these can be older goods as well

In the seventh month, we recommend purchasing an ABC-type fire extinguisher in the largest size that you can afford AND operate comfortably (2A10BC lasts twice as long on both A and B type fires as 1A5BC, and 4A30BC lasts four times as long on type A fires and three times as long on type B fires)

  • During the eighth month, solar blankets (which look like huge sheets of foil) can be purchased for less than $2 a piece and will keep you warm in the winter and protected from the sun’s heat during the summer
  • they also take up very little room in a kit.
  • Toilet paper and plastic bags for waste disposal (the bags that newspapers come in are ideal for this purpose)
  • a toothbrush and toothpaste
  • A supply of pet food and supplies, such as a water dish and an extra leash (if applicable)
  • Waterless hand sanitizer during the ninth month
  • Paper plates, plastic cups, plastic utensils, and rubbish bags are all examples of disposable items.
  • Items that provide comfort, such as toys, novels, plush animals, board games, and so on

In month 10, you’ll need storage bags to organize everything.They should be water-resistant (a duffel bag will not protect your equipment if your home is flooded) and shock-resistant in case your home is jolted about during the earthquake or aftershock.Keep the things within the bag tightly packed in plastic bags to keep pests and humidity out of the bag.Especially for big families, numerous smaller bags may be more manageable than a single large tote in terms of organization.

  • Preparation Set aside one hour each month to review skills and develop a disaster response plan in the event of a crisis, and make a note of it in your calendar. Remember that disaster preparedness is a family activity, so engage the entire family in the process. Month 1 – Getting Started Start putting together your emergency preparedness pack. Make a list of the products you will need (using our list above as a minimum guideline) and plan out your shopping trip.
  • Decide where you’ll keep your emergency kit. Ideally, your disaster kit should be kept in an easily accessible location where it is unlikely to be obstructed by other things that may fall in front of or on top of it (garages are a bad idea unless you have no other options). Put it beneath your bed or near the front entrance, for example.

Month No. 2 First aid and CPR skills should be reviewed or learned, and all responsible members of your home should do the same.

During the third month, you will learn where your utility shut-offs are located and how to shut them off appropriately.Make an eighth-turn on your gas shut-off (just enough to make it diagonal to the pipe, not completely perpendicular), and call the gas company if the shut-off is rusted open or otherwise won’t turn.If you are using propane, locate the tank shut-off valves and crank them by a half-turn to confirm that they are in proper working order.(This includes propane tanks for barbecue grills!)

Month four is a month of reorganization and reinvention. Make a strategy for your family. Determine where your meeting will take place and who will be representing you from out of state. Prepare for all eventualities, such as your children being at school, you being at work, your entire family going shopping, and so on.

  • This is the fifth month of the year. Basic firefighting techniques should be reviewed or learned. To become accustomed with the weight of your fire extinguisher, practice using it (without drawing the pin) many times. It’s important to remember the acronym PASS (Pull-Aim-Squeeze-Sweep)
  • teach your children to ″stop-drop-and-roll″ when their garments catch fire

Month 6 Discuss ″drop, cover, and hold″ techniques with your family, and identify locations in your house where you may practice these procedures on a regular basis. With your family, practice the ″drop, cover, and hold″ technique.

Countdown to the seventh month Identify any potential risks in your house.Install safety locks on your cupboards and drawers, and anchor your furniture to the wall with brackets or seismic straps to prevent it from being thrown off its foundation.Earthquake putty can be used to secure delicate things to shelves.Don’t forget to secure your televisions as well as other large electronic and appliance items.

Month eight is a month of remembrance.If you have homeowner’s or renter’s insurance, be sure you understand what it covers.If you don’t already have insurance, you should consider getting some.Make certain that all of your information, including inventory, is up to date.In the event that you decide not to get insurance, go through your house and compile a list of all the things you and your family own.Include brands and models, serial numbers, purchase dates (if known), approximate current values, and other pertinent information.

Inventory should be updated at least once every six months to guarantee that all of your belongings are covered in the case of a claim.When possible, utilize a video recording equipment to provide a visual documentation of your inventory, and save a duplicate of the film in a secure location outside the home (such as a safe deposit box or a relative out of the area).

Month nine is a month in which All of your family’s critical documents, including birth certificates and social security cards as well as vaccination records and immigration paperwork, should be placed in a secure location such as a safe deposit box or a portable fire safety box, to prevent them from being lost or stolen.Keep a duplicate in a safe place outside the home, such as with a distant relative who lives out of state (we suggest wherever you keep a copy of your home inventory for ease of remembering).

Month number ten Make a ″Immediate Response Kit″ for each member of your family and keep it in a safe place.These kits are straightforward, yet they contain essential supplies for use in the immediate aftermath of a tragedy.Ensure that you have at the very least the following items: sturdy shoes or boots, work gloves (for protection against shattered glass and other hazards), a flashlight with new batteries or glow sticks, and a ″OK/HELP″ card and adhesive to affix to your front door (to let response workers know if you need help or if they can go to the next home).Hard caps or helmets (excellent, durable bike helmets will suffice for youngsters) could also be considered as additional protection from falling debris.One of these kits should be kept next to or under each bed in the house, one for each family member, and your children should be taught to utilize their kit as soon as a tragedy happens.

  • Month eleven is a month of transition. Preparation should be made for long-term occurrences, such as the weeks or even months that follow a significant earthquake. Plan ahead of time for your family’s needs such as shelter, food, and other essentials, and have a contingency plan in place in the event that those alternatives are not accessible
  • Ensure that you have disaster kits for each of your cars, as well as a personal kit for your place of employment, if you haven’t previously done so. It is possible that these kits will not contain all of the same items (or that they will contain items that are different from your home kit), but they should contain at least one gallon of water per person per day, enough non-perishable food for 3-5 days (plus blankets, flashlights, and sturdy shoes). Not only will you be prepared no matter where you are when tragedy hits, but you will also be able to combine many kits to build an extended survival kit that will last for a week or more.

Month 12 is the final month of the year.Learn how to ″shelter-in-place″ in an emergency.In addition to acts of terrorism and nuclear catastrophes, significant smoke blown in from fires can create dangerous situations.Decide on a space in your house that has a minimum number of doors and windows and can accommodate everyone comfortably (a master bedroom with an attached bathroom is ideal).Ready.gov has information on ″sheltering in place,″ including step-by-step instructions.

For further information and tips, call the City of Lancaster’s Public Safety Office at (661) 723-6063 or visit the following websites: http://www.lancaster.ca/publicsafety/ The Emergency Management Division of the State of Washington is ready to assist you.http://prepare.org/index fr.php?lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=fr&lang=f (preparedness information for seniors, disabled, and others at-risk) Are You Prepared for What’s Ahead?

Lancaster

Lancaster is a city in Los Angeles County in the state of California, United States.It is located in Antelope Valley, on the western side of the Mojave Desert, 80 miles (130 kilometers) north of the city of Los Angeles and separated from it by the San Gabriel Mountains.It is the county seat of Los Angeles County.Because to the Southern Pacific Railroad’s construction of lines through the region in 1876 as part of its route between San Francisco and Los Angeles, the city’s expansion was almost ensured.It originated as a Scottish community created in 1884 by M.L.Wicks, who may have called it after his birthplace in Pennsylvania (though the origins of the city’s name are somewhat in dispute).

The city was officially established in 1885.In 1898, gold was discovered in the foothills surrounding the city, and borax (which is still produced locally and is commercially significant) was discovered in the same area.Before the early 1900s, the valley was mostly a cow ranching area, but the introduction of water pushed by gasoline motors converted it into an agricultural region.Lancaster has a lot in common with Palmdale (in the south) when it comes to the development of the aircraft, aerospace, and electronics industries; Lancaster’s Aerospace Walk of Honor (1990) is dedicated to test pilots who have contributed significantly to the industry.

  1. Edwards Air Force Base, which has hosted a number of space shuttle landings, is located northeast of town.
  2. Founded in 1929, the city’s community college serves the surrounding area.
  3. The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, located west of the city on more than 1,700 acres (700 hectares) of protected land, is dedicated to the preservation of native wildflowers, particularly the California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), which is the state flower of California.

East of Lancaster, you’ll find Saddleback Butte State Park and the Antelope Valley Indian Museum.The city was founded in 1977 and has a population of 156,633 people (2010) and 173,516 people (2020).The most recent revision and update to this article was performed by World Data Editors.

10 poorest zip codes in America

  • Poor counties are not just found in the South, the Midwest, or the West
  • they can also be found in large numbers in the Northeast. The following slides illustrate the ten most impoverished people based on the following criteria: The median household income, which is the point at which half of the persons earning more and half of those earning less are divided
  • Household income, which is the sum of all earnings divided by the number of persons who reported
  • mean household income
  • Approximately what proportion of households earns more than $150,000 per year
  • What percentage of the population earns less than $25,000 per year

In addition, read the paper below, which discusses the findings, trends, and rating criteria that were employed. (Photos courtesy of Shutterstock)

10. Zip code: 79901 │ El Paso, Texas.

The median household income in the United States is $13,110. The average household income is $21,601 dollars. 0.5 percent of households with annual incomes of $150,000 or more: Households with an annual income of $25,000 or less: 79.1 percent

9. Zip code: 36511 │ Bon Secour, Alabama.

0 percent of families earning $150,000 or more per year: 0 percent of households earning $25,000 or less per year: 0 percent of households earning $25,000 or less per year: 0 percent 77

8. Zip code: 06702 │ Waterbury, Connecticut.

Median household income: $14,060 Mean household income: $15,225 Percentage of families earning $150,000 or more per year: 0 Percentage of households earning $25,000 or less per year: 0 77

7. Zip code: 44702 │ Canton, Ohio.

The median household income is $9,455 per year. The average household earns $16,738 per year. The percentage of families earning $150,000 or more per year is zero. The percentage of households earning $25,000 or less per year is 81.6.

6. Zip code: 62523 │ Decatur, Illinois.

The median household income is $10,268 dollars. The average family income is $14,962. Percentage of families with annual incomes of $150,000 or more: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Percentage of families with annual incomes of $25,000 or less: 90.7

5. Zip code: 16501 │ Erie, Pennsylvania.

Family income: $10,268 per year on average Family income is $14,962 on average. Families making $150,000 or more per year are represented by the following percentage: The value of 0 is the same as the number of people who have never heard of the word. Households with annual incomes of $25,000 or less: % of total households 90.7

4. Zip code: 86029 │ Sun Valley, Arizona.

The median household income is $12,580, while the mean household income is $10,257. The percentage of families earning $150,000 or more per year is: 45%. Families earning $25,000 or less per year comprise 0 percent of the population. 91

3. Zip code: 44503 │ Youngstown, Ohio.

The median household income is $8,775 dollars. The average family income is $14,410. Percentage of families with annual incomes of $150,000 or more: 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Percentage of families with annual incomes of $25,000 or less: 92.8

2. Zip code: 97414 │ Broadbent, Oregon.

Median household income: $10,756 Mean household income: $13,072 Percentage of families earning $150,000 or more per year: 0 Percentage of households earning $25,000 or less per year: 93.4 Percentage of households earning less than $25,000 per year: 0

1. Zip code: 15929 │ East Wheatfield, Pennsylvania.

The median household income is $8,889 dollars.Average household income: $12,380 Percentage of families earning $150,000 or more per year: 0 Percentage of households earning $25,000 or less per year: 0 94.4 According to the Economic Innovation Group, those who reside in places that fared poorly during the Great Recession and have not seen a financial recovery may find themselves ″stuck″ in a ″Catch-22″ predicament.EIG conducted research late in 2018 that looked at around 25,800 zip codes to assess how residents fared in the wake of the Great Recession.The findings were published in the Huffington Post and the Wall Street Journal.Using EIG’s data, we were able to determine which towns had been left behind as the country began to emerge from the deep budgetary hole it had found itself in between 2007 and 2011.It discovered that many rural communities, primarily in the South, have remained behind the eight ball and have never truly recovered—and that many of the people living in them, who sought a way out through higher education, are now ensnared in student debt and are unable to leave where they are currently living.

Poor counties, on the other hand, are not limited to the South, the Midwest, or the West; there are several examples in the Northeast as well.″Young people are kind of imprisoned in debt in troubled neighborhoods,″ says Kenan Fikri, research director at EIG, according to the paper.And they don’t have a clear path out of their predicament, let alone the financial means to relocate to a thriving urban region in order to try to turn things around.″ EIG defines distress as a state of affairs based on seven indicators: educational attainment, housing vacancy, unemployment levels, poverty rate, median income, change in the number of jobs, and change in the number of businesses.Several rural areas in the United States, according to EIG, ″are forecast to never fully recover″ from the Great Recession.

  1. GoBankingRates looked at localities to determine where the poorest individuals in the country resided, as did the Federal Reserve.
  2. It looked at four factors while evaluating each zip code:
  1. The median household income, which is the point at which half of the persons earning more and half of those earning less are divided
  2. Household income, which is the sum of all earnings divided by the number of persons who reported
  3. mean household income
  4. Approximately what proportion of families earns more than $150,000 each year
  5. What percentage of the population earns less than $25,000 per year

The 10 poorest zip codes in America, according to GoBankingRates’ appraisal, are depicted in the slides above, along with the percentages of people who make high and low yearly earnings in each zip code.MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: In the United States, there is a growing disparity in life expectancy between the affluent and the poor.The five richest and five poorest area codes in the United States, as well as the ten states with the worst financial difficulty

American Family Housing » Less for many: ‘Opportunity gap’, income disparity, poverty grows in Orange County

According to a comprehensive survey conducted by government agencies and humanitarian groups, poverty in Orange County is increasing substantially, as is economic disparity, homelessness, and overcrowding in housing.It took 52 pages of brutal detail to lay out the deteriorating circumstances of an increasing number of local families in the annual Orange County Community Indicators report, which was issued this week.As a result, there is a ″opportunity gap,″ which manifests itself in ″abundant supports and resources for children of higher-income households and stagnated or deteriorating social mobility for children of lower-income and less educated families,″ according to the research.To be sure, the study observes that a stronger economy has resulted in decreased unemployment and, in particular, more high-paying positions for those with advanced degrees.However, a severe housing scarcity for the middle class and the poor is causing a mass exodus of wage earners from the county, which is endangering the county’s long-term economic well-being.“The fewer individuals of working age, the fewer there are to provide schools, pensions and other supports to the youngest and oldest members of a population,” the research cautions.

According to the report, those over the age of 65 are the only age group in the county whose share of the population is expected to increase over the next 25 years.″The image that is presented on television is that everyone in Orange County is rich and has a high quality of life,″ said Fred Smoller, a political science professor at Chapman University.″This report dispels the urban legend.″We have a two-tiered economy, with increasing amounts of wealth being concentrated in fewer and fewer families,″ says the author.

  1. Over the six-year period 2006-2013, the county’s median income, adjusted for inflation, decreased by 6 percent to $74,163.
  2. According to the poll, wages for lower-paid occupations such as administrative assistants and retail sales clerks have decreased, while incomes for higher-paid sectors such as computer programmers have increased.
  3. According to the survey, educational inequity is a major source of worry for businesses.

However, even though the number of Latinos in Orange County is expected to increase to 41 percent by 2040, the academic disparity between Latino pupils and their peers ″remains considerable and persistent, with no evidence of long-term improvement,″ according to the research.One out of every ten Latino students drops out of high school, and of those who do graduate, just a third are qualified to enroll in a University of California or a California State University institution, according to the data.As stated in the report, ″If our local graduates are inadequately educated and trained for jobs in key Orange County industries or are mismatched for those jobs, employers will be forced to import skilled workers or positions will go unfilled for longer periods of time, resulting in lower productivity.″ In addition to two public agencies – the Children & Families Commission of Orange County and CalOptima, which manages health care for the poor – and two private charities – the Orange County United Way and the Orange County Community Foundation – the survey was funded by the Orange County Community Foundation.

  1. It is based on data from the United States Census Bureau as well as other federal, state, and university studies, as well as research conducted by the Orange County Business Council and other local organizations..
  2. The poll inquired on a number of important topics.
  3. POVERTY According to government guidelines, the poverty rate in Orange County has increased from 8.8 percent to 13.5 percent of inhabitants during the previous nine years.
  4. For a family of four, this translates into an annual income of less than $24,000.
  5. The cost of living in Orange County, on the other hand, is 46 percent greater than the national average.

Orange County’s poverty rate is 24.3 percent, according to the more focused California Poverty Measure, which takes into consideration a variety of local characteristics, including housing costs, to arrive at that figure.Children are the ones that suffer the most.Young people living in poverty account for a third of Orange County’s population under 12 years old, which is a larger proportion than in the bordering counties of Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego.

The city of Anaheim, which is home to Disneyland, the county’s major employer, as well as adjacent Stanton, has the highest number of impoverished areas, followed by La Habra, Santa Ana, and Westminster.Disneyland is the county’s main employer.″I personally support the increase in the minimum wage in Los Angeles,″ stated Max Gardner, President and CEO of United Way of Greater Los Angeles.″I’d like to see something like that happen in Orange County.″ As an example, Gardner pointed out that a worker earning California’s $9 hourly minimum wage would have to work 110 hours per week in order to buy an average one-bedroom Orange County apartment, which rents for $1,238 per month, according to the research.However, despite the fact that Los Angeles and many other California cities are boosting their minimum wages to $15 an hour over the next several years, Orange County leaders have expressed a reluctance to do so, noting the strain it would have on companies.

This past May, the city of Irvine abolished its seven-year-old ″living wage″ legislation – the only such code in the county – which required city employees and contractors to be paid at least $10.82 an hour, or $13.43 an hour if their employers did not provide health coverage.HOUSING Since the bursting of the housing bubble, the chances for would-be homeowners have improved.By 2014, 44 percent of households would be able to purchase a starter home, compared to only 24 percent in 2006.Orange County, on the other hand, continues to be plagued by a severe housing shortage.

From 2006 to 2014, builders completed just 40% of the new housing units required for all income levels, and only 10% of the units required for low-income families were completed.In the last year, the rate of change has increased.Because of a lack of available housing, the cost of housing is 142 percent higher than the national average, which ″will discourage recent graduates, young entrepreneurs, and talented workers from remaining in the area and encourage them to relocate to more affordable counties and states,″ according to the report.Furthermore, the inability to provide affordable housing has resulted in a huge increase in the number of families who are doubling or tripling up in flats, as well as an increase in the number of homeless and inadequately housed children in recent years.Due in part to federal budget cuts, more than 100,000 Orange County households are on rental assistance waiting lists, which is a significant number.

National Community Renaissance, which develops affordable homes, is being held up by ″NIMBYism slash selfishness,″ according to Steve PonTell, president and CEO of National Community Renaissance.It goes something like this: ″I’ve got mine, and I don’t want ‘those people’ living in my neighborhood.″ He claims that new retail centers generate more sales tax for cities, and that more housing necessitates the need for more expensive services, which politicians oppose.His words were, ″It is completely irresponsible.″ ″Do they want to live in a county where their grandkids will be unable to support themselves?″ Lucy Dunn, president and CEO of the Orange County Business Council, expressed her displeasure with the Huntington Beach City Council’s recent decision to halt construction of 2,400 units at a previously authorized project near the Bella Terra shopping center.It is her assertion that ″we are not preparing for the future generation.″ In support of a California plan that would earn more than $300 million for affordable housing statewide by increasing the filing cost for various real estate papers from $18 to $75, Dunn’s group has approved it.The bill was defeated by the Orange County Board of Supervisors in a vote held in May.

This is a problem that affects everyone, not just the poor, according to Dunn.″Imagine if one-third of the employees at Mission Hospital in south Orange County did not reside in Orange County.Then there’s an earthquake, and the crew is unable to reach to the scene in time to save people.″ EDUCATION The dropout rate in Orange County is 6.4 percent, which is lower than the state’s rate of 11.6 percent, and the percentage of students qualifying for admission to UC and CSU is increasing.However, the aggregate figures conceal significant disparities in terms of race, ethnicity, and geographic location.According to the Laguna Beach Unified School District, 72 percent of students are qualified to attend UC and CSU institutions, but just 39 percent of students in Anaheim Unified are eligible.

More than half of low-income students are illiterate in English, a fact that ″is concerning for employers who increasingly demand so-called’soft skills,’ which include the ability to communicate effectively in writing and speech,″ according to a report published by the National Center for Education Statistics.THEIR HEALTH In keeping with national trends, one-third of Orange County children are overweight or obese, and in low-income areas, this number can reach as high as half of the population.It is estimated that diabetes and heart disease, two diseases linked to obesity, are increasing in prevalence.

″This trend is likely to continue if we do not develop measures to minimize juvenile obesity,″ the paper cautions.Mental health is becoming increasingly important.Since 2003, the number of youngsters admitted to hospitals for serious depression has increased by 28 percent.The number of people dying from drug overdoses, suicide, and alcohol-related liver illness is increasing.″Despite rising demand,″ the research stated, ″Orange County has a resident-to-mental health-care-provider ratio of 804 residents, compared to the statewide average of 623 residents,″ according to the report.The report’s purpose, whether it’s on poverty, housing, education, or health, is to drive action in order to ″make the community stronger for all of us,″ according to Gardner, the United Way’s chief executive officer.

″Charity alone will not be able to resolve some of these challenges.It is essential that elected authorities take the reins.″

ZIP Code 5: 93536 – LANCASTER, CA

According to a thorough survey conducted by government agencies and humanitarian groups, poverty in Orange County is on the rise, as is economic disparity, homelessness, and overcrowding in housing.It took 52 pages of graphic detail to describe the worsening predicament of an increasing number of local families, according to the annual Orange County Community Indicators report, which was issued this week.As a result, there is a ″opportunity gap,″ which manifests itself in ″abundant supports and resources for children from higher-income households and stagnated or deteriorating social mobility for children from lower-income and less educated families,″ according to the paper.As the poll points out, an improved economy has resulted in decreased unemployment and, particularly for those with higher education, a greater number of high-paying positions for those with more experience.In contrast, a severe housing scarcity for the middle class and the poor is causing a mass exodus of wage earners from the county, which is endangering the county’s long-term economic viability.A warning is issued in the study, saying that ″the smaller the number of persons of working age in a given population, the fewer there are to maintain schools, pensions, and other social services for the youngest and oldest citizens in a given population.″ There is a statement that adults over the age of 65 are the only age group in the county whose share of the population is expected to increase during the next 25 years.

As Fred Smoller, a political science professor at Chapman University, put it, ″the picture on television portrays people in Orange County as rich and having a high quality of life.″ A myth has been busted, thanks to this study.″ In our society, we have a two-tiered economy, with increasing amounts of money being concentrated in an increasing number of households.″ According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 2006 and 2013, the county’s median income decreased by 6 percent to $74,163.According to the results of the poll, wages for lower-paid occupations such as administrative assistants and retail sales clerks have decreased, while pay for higher-paid sectors such as computer programmers have risen.According to the research, educational disparities are a major source of worry for businesses.Orange County’s Hispanic population is expected to reach 41 percent by 2040, yet the academic disparity between Latino pupils and their peers ″remains considerable and persistent, with little evidence of progress over time,″ according to the research.

  1. One out of every ten Latino students drops out of high school, and just a third of those who do graduate are qualified to attend a University of California or a California State University institution.
  2. As stated in the research, ″If our local graduates are poorly educated and prepared for occupations in critical Orange County industries or are mismatched for those roles, firms will be forced to import qualified people or positions would remain vacant for extended periods of time, reducing productivity.″ In addition to two state institutions – the Children & Families Commission of Orange County and CalOptima, which provides health care for the poor – and two private charities – the Orange County United Way and the Orange County Community Foundation – the poll was funded by the California Endowment.
  3. It is based on data from the United States Census Bureau as well as other federal, state, and university studies, as well as research conducted by the Orange County Business Council and other local organizations.

Numerous important topics were covered in the study.In the last nine years, the poverty rate in Orange County has increased from 8.8 percent to 13.5 percent, according to government guidelines.If you have a family of four, your yearly income will be less than $24,000.

  1. The cost of living in Orange County, however, is 46 percent more than the national average, according to the American Community Survey (ACS).
  2. Orange County’s poverty rate is 24.3 percent, according to the more focused California Poverty Measure, which takes a variety of local factors into consideration, such as housing costs.
  3. The most vulnerable are children.
  4. In Orange County, one-third of adolescents under the age of 12 live in poverty, a larger proportion than in the bordering counties of Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego, which combined.
  5. With the exception of La Habra and Santa Ana, the cities with the highest concentration of impoverished areas include Anaheim, which is home to Disneyland, the county’s largest employer, as well as adjacent Stanton.

In his remarks, United Way President and CEO Max Gardner remarked, ″I personally support Los Angeles’ decision to increase the minimum wage.″ The opportunity to do so in Orange County is something I would welcome.A average one-bedroom apartment in Orange County, which rents for $1,238 a month, would need a worker earning California’s $9 hourly minimum wage to work 110 hours per week in order to afford it, according to the analysis.In contrast, despite the fact that Los Angeles and many other California cities are boosting their minimum salaries to $15 an hour over the next several years, Orange County leaders have showed no sign of wanting to follow suit, citing the strain it would have on companies.

This past May, the city of Irvine abolished its seven-year-old ″living wage″ legislation – the only such code in the county – which required city employees and contractors to be paid at least $10.82 an hour, or $13.43 an hour if their employers did not provide health insurance.HOUSING Since the bursting of the housing bubble, the outlook for would-be homeowners has brightened.Households could afford an entry-level home in 2014, up from 24% in 2006, according to the Census Bureau.While there has been some improvement, the housing crisis in Orange County has persisted.Construction of new homes for all income levels was only 40% complete between 2006 and 2014, with just 10% of the required low-income units completed.

During the past year, the rate of change has sped up significantly.The paper cautions that the high cost of housing, which is caused by a scarcity and is 142 percent more than the national average, ″will discourage recent graduates, young entrepreneurs, and bright workers from remaining and encourage them to migrate to more inexpensive counties or states.″ The inability to develop cheap housing has also resulted in a significant increase in the number of families who are doubling or tripling up in flats, as well as an increase in the number of homeless and inadequately housing children.More than 100,000 Orange County households are on rental assistance waiting lists, in part as a result of federal funding reductions.National Community Renaissance, which produces affordable homes, is being held up by ″NIMBYism slash selfishness,″ according to Steve PonTell, president and CEO of National Community Renaissance.

It goes something like this: ″I’ve got mine, and I don’t want ‘those folks’ living in my area.He claims that larger retail centers generate more sales tax for cities, and that increased housing necessitates the need for more expensive services, according to lawmakers.His words were, ″It is completely irresponsible″.Is it in their best interests to live in a county where their grandkids will struggle to make ends meet?the development of 2,400 units at a previously permitted project near Bella Terra was recently blocked by the Huntington Beach City Council, said Lucy Dunn, president and chief executive officer of the Orange County Business Council.

″We are not preparing for the future generation,″ she stated emphatically.″ In support of a California plan that would collect more than $300 million for affordable housing throughout the state by increasi

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