How Many Years Does It Take To Retire From The Post Office?

If you leave with at least 5 years but less than 10 years of service, you’re eligible to apply for retirement at age 62.
Based on years of service, a postal worker earns 1.5 to 3.5 percent of their “high-3” average salary for each year. The maximum allowable yearly annuity cannot be more than 80 percent of the high-3 average, which generally happens for those retiring after about 42 years of service.

What is the retirement age for the United States postal service?

The standard age for retirement at the USPS is 65, and there are retirement plans placed under both Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS) and Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) depending on whether service life began before or after 1984.

Where can I find retirement information for postal service employees?

CSRS and FERS Handbook for Personnel and Payroll Offices, Chapter 40. The Postal Service ensures that retirement information and counseling are made available to Postal Service employees. Retirement annuity estimates are provided to all employees through the use of the National Retirement Counseling System (NARECS) as follows:

Retirement for Postal Workers: Everything you need to know

  • This is the plan that applies to all postal employees who began working before 1984 and who were hired before 1984. Because they are covered by the Civil Service Retirement System, postal employees contribute around 7-8 percent of their monthly paychecks to their retirement plans under the CSRS. In contrast to the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), they do not pay any social security retirements and do not qualify for social security benefits. The US OPM (Office of Personnel Management) determines the amount of the payment by looking at the highest wage received during any consecutive three years of employment in the United States of America (Similar to the FERS system). Based on the number of years of active service a worker has accrued, he or she gets around 1.5-3.5 percent of the average of the highest-paying three years of their employment history. The bar for the highest annuity authorized under the high-3 average is set at 80 percent, which applies to persons who have more than 40 years of service under their belts. Taking advantage of CSRS retirement may result in a high three of the average income of over $60,000, and after 20 years of service, that individual can receive almost $22,000 per year without any deductions, or approximately $1,824 per month in retirement income. A individual with 40 years of service will be entitled for a salary of nearly $46,000 per year or $3,837 per month if they remain with the company for the whole period. There is the possibility of an increase in this amount if the worker made contributions to any type of voluntary account while in service or has unused sick leave credits in their account. You can also make modifications to your annuity to account for inflation, which may result in bigger payouts in the future. Keep in mind that a postal worker who was employed under the CSRS can have their retirement plans converted to the FERS, but the inverse is not authorized in this situation. A voluntary layoff method is used by the USPS from time to time in order to reduce the amount of surplus staff that they may have. In the event that you choose to retire through this method (also known as the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority), you will be able to access your retirement assets significantly sooner than other postal employees. You must, however, satisfy the following requirements in order to be considered eligible: employed by the United States Postal Service for at least 31 days prior to the VERA’s notification
  • You must be at least 50 years old and have worked for the United States government for at least 20 years, or you can be of any age provided you have 25 years of federal service under your belt.
  • It is necessary to have at least five years of civilian government service under your belt.
  • Unjustified dismissal that is not the result of wrongdoing or poor performance

569 General Retirement Information

569.1 Retirement Counseling

569.11 Responsibility

The Postal Service guarantees that information and counseling on retirement are made accessible to Postal Service workers who work for the agency.

569.12 Retirement Annuity Estimates

All workers are given with retirement annuity estimates through the usage of the National Retirement Counseling System (NARECS), which is structured as follows:

  1. Within three years of an employee’s initial voluntary retirement eligibility date, which is determined by the payroll and personnel system, the employee may seek an early retirement.
  2. Every year, once the age and service qualifying requirements for voluntary retirement have been satisfied, the system will take over.
  3. ERetire, the self-service web-based application provided by the United States Postal Service
  4. Employers with limited internet access can get annuity estimates by calling the Human Resources Shared Service Center (HRSSC).
569.13 Group Retirement Information Programs
569.131 Nature of Group Programs

Every fiscal year, the Postal Service ensures that at least one CSRS retirement information event is held at a local location.Sessions will be available to all workers, regardless of age, years of service, or the date on which they become eligible for voluntary retirement.Spouses and other interested individuals will be permitted to participate as well.These programs are delivered through a combination of media and facilitation, with the dates, times, and other specifics of the sessions being chosen by local service staff and volunteers.

Participation is entirely optional and takes place outside of working hours.In accordance with 569.14, group information programs are intended to be used in conjunction with individual therapy rather than as a substitute.

569.132 Group Program Content

At retirement information sessions, employees may learn about a variety of topics that may be relevant to their retirement planning. This will help them to make more informed decisions about their future retirement years.

569.14 Individual Retirement Counseling
569.141 Nature of Individual Counseling

Individual retirement counseling from the Human Resources Shared Services Center can be requested by workers as part of the retirement process (HRSSC).A retirement consultant is available at the HRSSC who can give thorough information on retirement health benefits, life insurance, and other retirement–related benefit programs, as well as other services.In most cases, these therapy sessions are performed over the phone, however they may also incorporate the use of a computer and/or other electronic devices as necessary.The retirement expert may also refer the employee to other resources for information on certain issues, such as the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) or Social Security.

Sessions are considered on-the-clock if the retirement specialist is accessible to give such counseling during the same tour that the employee is participating in.

569.142 Counseling Session Content

An annuity estimate is ordered by the retirement specialist prior to arranging the counseling session. The annuity estimate is based on the retirement effective date and type of retirement (optional, disabled, etc.) requested by the employee and is mailed to the employee’s registered address. During the retirement counseling appointment, the retirement consultant will discuss the following:

  1. The supervisor reviews the employee’s retirement application and ensures that all necessary paperwork have been signed and dated.
  2. Examines the employee’s annuity estimate and responds to any queries that the employee may have posed
  3. Provides clarification on the employee’s employment and leave status up to and including the day of retirement
  4. When further documentation, proofs, affidavits, or other evidence is required, it is identified.
  5. The verification of civilian and military service history, as well as the benefits of deposits and redeposits, if any, are performed.
  6. In addition to alternative fund annuities (AFA), health benefits, life insurance, terminal leave, Thrift Savings Accounts (TSAs), and flexible benefits are addressed in this chapter.
569.143 Advice to Employee

When giving retirement advise to employees, the retirement counselor reminds the employee of the following facts:

  1. Despite the fact that information is supplied on numerous provisions and possibilities under the retirement legislation, final decisions (with the exception of management–initiated disability retirement) are left to the discretion of the employee.
  2. Any estimate of annuity is provisional and subject to final decision by the Office of Personnel Management.

569.2 Retirement Forms

569.21 Guidelines for Processing Personnel Actions

Processing retirement forms in conjunction with personnel actions is covered in detail in Handbook EL–301, Guidelines for Processing Personnel Actions, which may be found here.

569.22 Requisitioning Forms

A adequate supply of retirement forms is planned to be maintained at all installations to fulfill the projected demand. Obtaining these forms from the area supply center is done in accordance with standard requisitioning processes.

569.3 Retirement Account Information

The Eagan ASC is responsible for maintaining the official individual retirement records.Any questions about an employee’s retirement account (including the amount of retirement deductions) that cannot be answered locally are referred by management to the retirement division of the Eagan Administrative Services Center (ASC).All of the individual’s retirement records, which include service in any federal agency or prior postal service with a break in employment of at least four days, are on file with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

569.4 Information Source for Separated or Retired Employees

If you have a question about the amount of annuity to which a separated or retired employee is entitled, or about special benefits for survivors of employees or annuitants, you should contact the following people: BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENTPO BOX 45BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

569.5 Information Source for Employees

Any inquiries pertaining to administration, or any questions requiring interpretation of the Civil Service retirement legislation or regulations, are directed to the following departments: MGR COMPENSATIONEMPLOYEE RESOURCE MANAGEMENTUS POSTAL SERVICE SWWASHINGTON DC 20260–4213 475 L’ENFANT PLZ SWWASHINGTON DC 20260–4213

569.6 Federal Income Tax

569.61 Taxable Annuities

According to the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the ″three–year rule″ is no longer in effect for any individual whose annuity starting date is on or after July 1, 1986.This regulation generally stated that annuities were tax–free for up to three years, provided that employee contributions were made, and that annuity payments were made.According to the Internal Revenue Code, annuities that become effective after July 1, 1986 are subject to the ″general rule.″ It is provided by this regulation, which states that each monthly annuity payment is divided into two parts: (1) the tax–free portion (which represents a return of employee payments), and (2) the taxable balance.Once the tax–free portion has been computed, it is a fixed monetary figure that stays in force until the annuitant has recouped all of the contributions made to the retirement fund, whichever occurs first.

At that point, the full monthly annuity is subject to income tax.A publication from the Internal Revenue Service, Publication 721, Comprehensive Tax Guide to Civil Service Retirement Benefits, describes how the federal tax regulations apply to CSRS annuities.

569.62 Federal Income Tax Withholding

Federal income tax withholdings on CSRS annuities are required to be made unless the annuitant specifically requests that no tax be withheld.If an annuitant chooses not to have tax deducted from his or her benefits, he or she may be required to make estimated tax payments.As a general rule, the tax withheld or anticipated tax, or a combination of the two, must cover at least 90 percent of the annuitant’s total tax for the year, or 100 percent of the tax indicated on the annuitant’s previous year’s return, whichever is less.Form W–4PA, which is accessible through the Office of Personnel Management, allows annuitants to specify the amount they desire to have withheld.

569.63 Federal Income Tax Questions

Questions pertaining to any part of federal income taxation are directed to the District Director of Internal Revenue in the appropriate district.

569.7 Privacy Act Considerations

569.71 General

Individuals’ information can be found in their retirement records. As a result, they may only be handled and released in conformity with the Privacy Act and its implementing regulations.

569.72 OPM Records

Records that are transmitted to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) become the property of the OPM.Consequently, retired personnel wishing to make particular requests for certain records should submit their inquiries to the following addresses: BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENTPO BOX 45BOYERS, PA 16017–0045 RETIREMENT OPERATIONS CENTEROFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

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569.73 Postal Service Records

The Postal Service may keep copies of an individual’s retirement records and related correspondence in one of two places: either in the personnel area as part of the privacy system entitled USPS 120.070, Personnel Records — General Personnel Folders (Official Personnel Folders and Records Related Thereto), or in the PDC as part of the privacy system entitled USPS 050.020, Finance Records — Payroll System.Employees who wish to seek access to or updates to these records should send their requests to the local Postal Service personnel office for processing, rather than the central office.

How and When to Retire

  • You are entitled to benefits after 10 years of employment. When you reach the age of 60, you become eligible to receive benefits.
  • Once you have completed 30 years of service or reached the age of 60, you are eligible for an instant bonus that is free of penalties.
  • As an Old Plan Member, you are entitled for extended benefits after 34 years of service if you are a retired employee.

Early Retirement

If you are under the age of 60 and have completed 25 years of service, you are entitled for an immediate benefit with a decrease in your pension.

Disability Retirement:

  • Members of the New Plan become eligible for disability retirement benefits after 13 years and 4 months of service, while members of the GSEPS become eligible after 15 years of service, provided that they have not attained the age of 60. In the event that your membership begins before July 1, 2007, your potential rewards will be enhanced as a result of extra service. When you achieve the milestones of 18 years and 1 month of service, 22 years and 10 months of service, and 27 years and 7 months of service, you will see significant gains.

Law Enforcement:

For further information, please contact our office.

How Do I Retire?

  • We make every effort to make your future retirement as enjoyable as possible. Members who are retiring as a service retirement, who have already selected a retirement date, and who have a current estimate of their retirement benefits should apply online by clicking on the Log In button at the top of this page. Once you have signed into the secure desktop, select the option to apply for retirement. It also provides all of the essential ERS paperwork, as well as instructions on how to retire online.
  • Everyone else who is not submitting an application for an ERS service retirement should obtain a paper application.
  • Retirement applications cannot be accepted more than 90 days prior to the retirement date, and they must be received in our office at least 30 days prior to the retirement date in order for us to process them on a timely manner. The application is deemed submitted only when it has been received by the ERSGA.
  • Retirement always begins on the first of the month, regardless of the day of the week. The first retirement payment is put directly into your bank account on the final working day of your first paycheck month.

Visit the State Health Benefit Plan (SHBP) website for further information on how to keep your State Health Benefit Plan (SHBP) coverage after you retire. Contact the GaBreeze Benefit Center at 1.877.342.7339, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST, for information on how to keep your Dental Insurance after you leave the workforce.

WRAP and Scheduling an Appointment with an Analyst

Are you planning to retire soon?Then plan to see our WRAP (Workshop for Retirement Answers and Preparation) sessions online for the most in-depth review of your retirement benefits available anywhere.WRAP was created expressly for those who are less than three months away from retirement and brings together information from the ERS, Peach State Reserves, Flexible Benefits, and the State Health Benefits Program.In many cases, a phone conversation with a counselor will be sufficient to answer all of your inquiries.

Despite the fact that individual phone sessions may be planned, seeing the WRAP presentations is recommended in order to ensure that you have all of the information you want before your appointment.The office is open from 8:00 a.m.to 4:30 p.m.Monday through Friday.

Phone appointments will not be made after 4:00 p.m.in order to ensure that you have ample time to discuss your requirements with a member of our team.

A Guide to the FERS Minimum Retirement Age and How It Works

It is possible to retire from the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) at a younger age than 65 under certain conditions. This minimum retirement age defines the earliest age at which a government employee can retire provided they have accumulated a sufficient number of years of service. The actual age of an employee might vary depending on the year of his or her birth.

Minimum Retirement Age

If you were born in 1970 or after, you are entitled to retire at the age of 57, which is the minimum retirement age (MRA).Workers born before 1948 are required to retire at the age of 55, while those born in 1963 or 1964 are required to retire at the age of 56.By 2019, all workers who were born in 1963 or earlier will have achieved the mandatory retirement age of 65 years (or by their birthdate in 2019 if they were born in 1963).For people born after 1964, two months are added to the MRA for each year of their lives until they reach the age of 70.

How Federal Retirement Eligibility Is Calculated

The Federal Employees’ Retirement System (FERS) follows the ″Rule of 80.″ According to this rule, an employee must have accumulated a total of 80 years of service, including both age and government service, in order to be eligible for retirement.Consider the following scenario: a 22-year-old college graduate joins federal employment immediately after graduation.After 29 years of service, they will be 51 years old.Employee has met the rule of 80, but he or she has not yet achieved the mandatory retirement age of 65 years.

With an MRA of 57, the employee has six more years until he or she becomes eligible for retirement.Given that this employee wishes to retire as soon as they become eligible to do so, FERS receives six more years of retirement contributions from them and forgoes the opportunity to receive six further years of annuity payments by requiring them to wait until they reach the age of 57.At the age of 51, retirement might seem enticing.An individual can make the decision to pursue a different professional path while still having enough time to establish a solid foundation for the future.

Even while retirement is still an attractive option at age 57, many government employees prefer to continue working until they reach their mid-60s or even later.In addition, because the Social Security Administration enables Americans to retire at the age of 62, this is an increasingly common time for government employees across all levels of government to accept their retirement benefits.

Other Retirement Circumstances

In order to accommodate a variety of additional retirement possibilities, the FERS has provisions in place: If you are forced to leave your job for any reason, you may be eligible for early retirement. This includes involuntary separations as well as separations that occur as a result of a reduction or reorganization of the federal workforce.

Who Qualifies for the Program? Over the age of 50: A minimum of 20 years of service is required (10 short of the ″rule of 80″) 25 years of service if you are under the age of 50. Handicap: The agency must certify that it is unable to accommodate the disability in the position at hand.

Who Qualifies for the Program?Workers with at least 18 months of service who are injured to the degree that they are unable to perform their existing job duties due to accident or sickness are eligible for disability benefits.If an employee leaves their job before reaching the age of eligibility for immediate retirement, they may be able to delay or defer their benefits.They must have five years or more of creditable civilian service under their belts by the time they reach the age of 62.

For each year under the age of 62 that the employee has worked, benefits are lowered by 5 percent.This is true unless the employee has worked for at least 10 years but less than 30 and retires at the age of 60 or older.

Immediate Benefits

Based on the number of years of service and the age of the employee, employees become eligible for benefits within 30 days of the day they leave their position.Employees must have completed at least five years of employment before they may retire at the age of 62.At the age of 60, this climbs to 20 years of service.When an employee reaches a minimum retirement age, he or she becomes eligible for immediate retirement benefits after 10 to 30 years of service.

Again, if they have fewer than 30 years of service, their benefits are cut by 5 percent for each year they are under the age of 62, unless they have accumulated 20 years of service and retire at the age of 60 or older, in which case payments are not decreased.

How Much Do Postal Workers Get Paid When They Retire?

Many postal workers work for the United States Postal Service for the entirety of their careers.As a postal employee, you’ll have access to several USPS benefits, including the federally mandated uniform retirement plan.The amount of money a postal worker receives in USPS retirement is determined by whatever retirement plan he or she is enrolled in and how long he or she has worked for the USPS.Although the United States Postal Service automatically retires at the age of 65, there are retirement schemes in existence under the Civil Service Retirement System and the Federal Employment Retirement System that have an impact on salary.

In order to receive their monthly payout, those who retire under the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority must first complete specific eligibility requirements.

Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS)

The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) is available to postal personnel who began their careers before 1984.Employees who participate in the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) contribute 7 to 8 percent of their monthly income to the retirement system, which helps to defray the cost of their eventual pensions.They do not, however, contribute to Social Security retirement benefits since they are not eligible for Social Security payments under the CSRS.The U.S.

Office of Personnel Management calculates how much post office retirement is owed under the Civil Employment Retirement System (CSRS) based on the highest income earned during any three consecutive years of service.A postal worker gets 1.5 to 3.5 percent of their ″high-3″ average wage for each year of service, depending on the number of years of service.The highest permissible yearly pension cannot be more than 80 percent of the high-3 average, which is typically the case for people who retire after around 42 years of service in the military.Compensation may be raised if the postal worker made voluntary contributions while working or has any accrued but unutilized sick time left behind.

It is possible that cost-of-living adjustments may be made to the annuity, which would result in greater payments.Contributions to survivor’s benefits or a health benefit plan reduce the amount of money paid out.To give an example of a USPS retirement under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), use a postal worker with a high-3 average of around $60,000 and 20 years of service who earns $1,824 per month without deductions.This amounts to almost $22,000 each year.

  1. A worker earning the same wage and having 40 years of experience makes $3,837 each month, or almost $46,000 per year.
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Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS)

After 1984, every postal employee employed after that date is eligible for USPS retirement under the Federal Employment Retirement System (FERS).Despite the fact that FERS pays less than CSRS, postal workers are eligible for Social Security and Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) benefits.Every pay month, postal workers make contributions to the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) and Social Security.The United States Postal Service (USPS) and the employee both make tax-deferred payments to the TSP.

The Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) likewise utilizes the high-3 average, with each year of service worth 1 to 1.1 percent of the high-3 average wage.Under the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS), a postal worker with a high-3 average of roughly $60,000 and 20 years of service gets $1,007 per month, net of deductions.This amounts to around $12,000 each year.Using the same wage and 40 years of service, a worker receives $2,013 each month, or almost $24,000 per year in earnings.

Due to the fact that FERS employees get Social Security benefits in addition to the distribution of their TSP payments, the true number is substantially greater.If you were employed under the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), you can move to the Federal Employment Relations System (FERS).After then, the annuity is computed based on the number of years spent under each plan.

Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA)

  • The United States Postal Service (USPS) engages in voluntary layoffs from time to time in order to minimize their staff. People who choose to retire under the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) will be able to collect their full retirement benefits sooner than they would otherwise be able to. A postal worker must satisfy the following qualifications in order to be eligible for VERA: Employed by the United States Postal Service for 31 days prior to receiving notification of the VERA
  • If you are over 50 and have at least 20 years of government experience, or if you are any age and have at least 25 years of government experience, you qualify.
  • Service in the civilian administration for a minimum of five years
  • A dismissal that is not the result of misbehavior or poor performance
  • and

Payments are established based on whether the employee is covered by the CSRS or FERS plan, and payments begin on the first day of the month following retirement.

Retirement Benefit Questions

  • It initially published in the September/October 2020 edition of the American Postal Worker magazine. (This article first appeared in the September/October 2020 issue of the American Postal Worker magazine. What will happen to your federal retirement pension if you resign/separate from the United States Postal Service before you are eligible to retire is dependent on a number of things, the first of which is how much creditable federal service you have at the time of your departure. The credit for active duty military service can be applied toward retirement eligibility
  • however, federal workers must complete a minimum of five years of civilian federal employment that is covered by FERS retirement deductions in order to fulfill the minimum criteria for a FERS pension benefit. Leaving because of a handicap or under the provisions of a Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) does not apply in any of the circumstances listed below. You can also get a refund of your Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) payments if you have less than five years of creditable civilian service. If you resign or separate from the company after five years of service, your retirement benefit will be calculated based on the number of years of service you have when you leave and your age when you apply for the retirement benefit as follows: It is possible to qualify for a deferred retirement benefit if you leave with 5 or more years of service at the time of your retirement at the time of your retirement at age 62 or later. If you leave with at least 5 but less than 10 years of service, you may be able to apply for retirement at the time of your retirement. The benefit is calculated as 1 percent times your high-3 years average salary multiplied by the number of years and months of service
  • if you leave with 10 years but less than 30 years of service, you are eligible for a reduced retirement benefit when you reach your minimum retirement age (MRA, which is 55-57 years old depending on your year of birth), which is calculated the same as the above, with the exception that there is a 5 percent reduction for each year you are under the age of 62
  • if you leave with
  • For example, if you leave with 20 years of service but less than 30 years of service, you can prevent the 5 percent decrease for each year that passes by by waiting until you reach the age of 60 before applying for the retirement benefit.
  • If you leave with 30 years or more of service, you will be entitled for an unreduced retirement benefit when you reach your MRA (age 55-57)
  • but, if you leave with less than 30 years of service, you will be eligible for a reduced retirement benefit.
  • When you reach your MRA or later and you resign/separate before accruing enough service to qualify for an unreduced instant retirement, you may still be eligible for a retirement benefit in the following ways: If you’re at your MRA and have fewer than 10 years of service, you may be eligible for a postponed retirement at the age of 62, as previously indicated.
  • In the event that you are at your MRA with at least 10 years of service but less than 30 years of service, you are entitled for an immediate, reduced FERS retirement payment with the age penalty applied to your benefit. Similarly to the previous computation, you may be able to get credit for any unused sick leave balance.
  • It is possible to avoid the age reduction penalty if you are at your MRA with at least 10 years of service but less than 20 years of service. If you wait until you are 62 years old to file for your retirement benefit, the age reduction penalty will be erased.

Send an email to [email protected] if you have any questions about retirement.

Elections Matter

It is our way of life, our present and past employers, our families, our health, and our future that are being attacked.We must all work together today to assist our fellow countrymen and women who are in need.Because we are labor and community activists, as well as people of goodwill who have worked long and hard to build this country, we must do everything in our power to ensure that Joe Biden, as well as the other candidates who support us and our issues, receive votes by mail or in person in the upcoming presidential election on November 6, 2016.

583 Annuities

583.1 General Requirements

583.11 Conduct

Anyone who has been convicted of a crime involving the national security of the United States is unable to receive a pension or annuity from the government.

583.12 Time

An employee must have completed at least 5 years of creditable civilian service before becoming eligible for an annuity.

583.13 Age and Service

In the absence of a disciplinary action under 583.11, employees who are separated for any cause other than those specified in that section are entitled for voluntary retirement and an immediate unreduced pension if they fulfill one of the following combinations of age and service:

  1. Age 62, with five years of creditable civilian service under one’s belt
  2. With 20 years of creditable service, including 5 years of creditable civilian service, at the age of sixty-five
  3. 30 years of creditable service, including 5 years of creditable civilian service, is required to reach the minimum retirement age (MRA).
583.14 Minimum Retirement Age

In the United States, the minimum retirement age (MRA) is established by a person’s year of birth, as follows:

Year of Birth MRA
Before 1948 55 Years
1948 55 Years and 2 Months
1949 55 Years and 4 Months
1950 55 Years and 6 Months
1951 55 Years and 8 Months
1952 55 Years and 10 Months
1953–1964 56 Years
1965 56 Years and 2 Months
1966 56 Years and 4 Months
1967 56 Years and 6 Months
1968 56 Years and 8 Months
1969 56 Years and 10 Months
1970 and After 57 Years
583.15 Immediate Reduced Annuity

Furthermore, in addition to the instant unreduced annuities stated in 583.13, a person may elect to receive an immediate reduced annuity under the following conditions:

  1. The individual has reached the minimum retirement age
  2. the individual has at least 10 years of creditable service, with at least 5 years of creditable civilian service
  3. and the annuity is decreased by 5 percent per year for each year the individual is under the age of 62 at the time of retirement. Prorated on the basis of 5/12 of 1 percent for each full month, this is calculated as follows:

583.2 Requirements and Procedures by Types of Separations

583.21 Involuntary Separation

The following conditions must be met by an employee who has been involuntarily removed from work in order to be eligible for an instant annuity:

  1. Regardless of age
  2. or has completed 20 years of creditable service, including 5 years of creditable civilian service, and is at least 50 years old
  3. or
  4. The separation is not based on allegations of wrongdoing or delinquency
  5. rather, it is based on other factors.
  6. It is not known if the employee has refused a reasonable offer of another position.
583.22 Mandatory Retirement

Postal Inspectors are the only postal personnel who are liable to obligatory retirement due to their advanced years of experience. Mandatory retirement begins on the last day of the month in which they reach the age of 57 or when they have served for 20 years in law enforcement if they are above the age of 57 at the time of retirement.

583.23 Disability Retirement Requirements
583.231 Service

The employee must have completed at least 18 months of creditable civilian service before being considered for promotion.

583.232 Disability

During his or her 18 months of creditable civilian service, the employee must have fulfilled the following:

583.233 Duration

The individual’s crippling medical condition must be expected to last for at least one year from the date on which he or she became incapacitated.

583.3 Deferred Annuity

583.31 Eligibility

An employee may be eligible for a deferred annuity if he or she leaves the service before becoming eligible for an instant annuity and has at least 5 years of creditable civilian service at the time of separation.

583.32 Commencement Date

Employees who have accrued at least 5 years of creditable service may be eligible to begin receiving a delayed annuity the first day of the month following the month in which they reach the age of 62.Annuity payments may begin as early as the first day of the month after the month in which the employee reaches the minimum retirement age if the employee has at least 10 years creditable service, including 5 years creditable civilian service (see 583.14).Depending on the age of the annuitant, these annuities may be subject to a decrease (see 583.15).

583.33 Restriction

In order to be eligible for a delayed annuity, the individual must not take any of his or her retirement contributions from his or her retirement fund while still employed.

Do Postal Workers Get Social Security? 

Social Security is a retirement system that American workers contribute to throughout the course of their working lives.Individuals are eligible to obtain Social Security payments if they reach a particular age limit.Many older folks rely on these benefits to assist cover their living expenses and other everyday expenditures once they retire because they no longer have a regular wage coming in to supplement their income.Do postal workers, on the other hand, receive Social Security?

Postal workers are considered federal employees, and whether or not federal employees are eligible to collect Social Security benefits is determined by the length of time they spent working for the government.Some postal workers may be qualified for Social Security benefits, while others may be ineligible for any benefits at all.

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Which Workers Are Eligible? 

Employees of the federal government, including postal employees, who were hired before 1983 were not required to pay social security taxes.Instead, these employees made contributions to the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), which provides a distinct set of benefits.The Social Security Administration does not provide payments to employees who chose to remain in the CSRS after 1983.Workers who left the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) and began paying Social Security taxes after 1983 may find that their CSRS pensions have an influence on their eligibility for Social Security benefits if they had less than 30 years of considerable earnings under Social Security.

Postal workers who are currently employed and those who were recruited after 1983 contribute to the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) and are eligible to receive Social Security benefits.

How Much Does a Postal Service Worker Make in Retirement?

The government retirement program offers pension payments as well as disability insurance to those who are qualified for it.It is dependent on the age of the postal worker and the length of time they have worked as a postal worker or government employee before retiring.A postal worker who retired in 2020 after 25 years of service would get a basic annuity of between $1,308 and $1,335, depending on his or her age.

How Many Years Do You Have to Work for the Post Office to Retire?

An employee of the federal government who wishes to be eligible for retirement annuities must have completed at least 5 years of creditable civilian service and 20 years of service. They must also be a particular age in order to be eligible for benefits, and this age is determined by the year in which they were born. These individuals are between the ages of 55 and 57.

What Benefits Do Postal Workers Get?

Postal workers are compensated handsomely for their efforts with a comprehensive benefits package.Compensation, health benefits, dental and vision insurance, flexible spending accounts, long-term care insurance, retirement, life insurance, commuter programs, professional development programs, vacation and sick leave, and ten paid holidays each year are all included in this category.Postal workers who have just been hired are eligible for Social Security and Medicare benefits.Other postal employees may be eligible for benefits as well, depending on when they were employed and which projects they have contributed to throughout the course of their careers with the company.

Can You Collect Social Security If You Never Worked?

Social Security is a scheme that employees must contribute to for a minimum of ten years.It is possible to obtain Social Security payments even if you have never worked if you are a family member of someone who did work and paid into the system and contributed to the system.Spouses, ex-spouses, children, and parents may also be eligible for spousal, survivor, or children’s benefits based on the history of earnings and Social Security tax payments made by the qualified worker throughout their marriage.

Planning to retire

Information for NALC members planning to retire soon

Employees are obliged to apply for retirement through the United States Postal Service Human Resources Shared Services (USPS HRSS) even though the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) determines all decisions about retirement eligibility (HRSSC).HRSSC may be reached by dialing 877-477-3273, option 5, and following the instructions.Preparing to submit your Employee ID and PIN when phoning HRSSC is highly recommended.Upon request, HRSSC will: Mail a personalized annuity estimate based on a projected retirement date supplied by the employee; Provide an annuity estimate based on a projected retirement date provided by the employee; Individual pre-retirement counseling should be scheduled and provided through telephone; Send a bundle of material (often referred to as the ‘blue book’) containing forms and guidelines.

Employees who are near to retirement eligibility can also access HRSSC retirement services using the LiteBlue eRetire application, which is available on the HRSSC website.Employees who wish to access eRetire must be aware of their Employee ID and USPS Pin numbers.The following features are available with the LiteBlue eRetire application: Individualized annuity estimates may be seen and printed.There are two options for requesting and receiving a retirement application packet: Please go here to download and print a retirement application packet.

Order a retirement application package and have it delivered to your home.Make an appointment for a retirement counseling session.In addition to the information accessible from the USPS HRSSC, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) provides retirement information, and the NALC Retirement Department provides retirement information and guidance to its members.Retirement Department of the National Association of Letter Carriers distributes a brochure titled ″Preparing for Retirement,″ as well as Question & Answer booklets on retirement concerns for CSRS and FERS.

  1. More information may be found by clicking here.

Retirement counseling

The Postal Service has a contractual obligation to provide letter carriers who are approaching retirement eligibility with personalized pre-retirement counseling if they so want.The goal of the counseling is to encourage workers to make fully informed decisions about their retirement.Individual retirement counseling is given by a retirement specialist at the United States Postal Service Human Resources Shared Services Center over the phone by the Postal Service (HRSSC).Letter carriers can request and arrange a counseling session by contacting Human Resources Services Center at 877-477-3273 option 5, or by logging into the Liteblue eRetire program online.

Letter carriers have the right to get individual therapy at any time throughout the workday if they so want.Whenever a letter carrier desires to undergo therapy at any time of day or night, local management must provide a reasonable amount of privacy.During the therapy session, the letter carrier has the right to have his or her spouse and/or an adviser present with him or her.In addition to assisting with the completion of paperwork (e.g., StandSF2801 and any other forms pertaining to FEGLI, FEHB, and TSP), the counseling will also include aid with military and civilian service deposit difficulties (for example, StandSF2801).

If a letter carrier is unable to begin or finish a planned individual retirement counseling session, the matter will be handled at the local level by the union and management working together to resolve the situation.Individual and group retirement counseling are mandated to be provided by the United States Postal Service.That obligation stems from the law (the Civil Service Retirement Act and the Federal Employees Retirement Act), guidance from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM is the federal agency responsible for administering the CSRS and FERS), provisions of the USPS Employee and Labor Relations Manual (click here and here for the provisions), and national-level settlements with the National Association of Labor Confederations.Please call the NALC Retirement Department if you have any issues in receiving personalized retirement counseling.

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Annuity Estimates

The annuity estimate, which is a personalized computer-generated report, is issued twice a year to the home addresses of those workers who are currently eligible for retirement by the Human Resources Services and Support Center.Human Resources (HRSSC) can provide personalised annuity estimates to employees who are less than three years away from retirement eligibility.HRSSC.Employees who are less than 5 years away from retiring eligibility can examine and print personalized annuity estimates on-line at LiteBlue utilizing the eRetire tool, which is accessible through the LiteBlue website.

Annuity estimates under the CSRS and FERS are provided by the NALC Retirement Department, which produces generic monthly charts displaying annuity estimates under both programs.

In this section

  • Materials Reference System (MRS)
  • Joint Statement on Violence
  • National Agreement on Contract Administration Manual (JCAM)
  • Contract Talk and NALC Activist
  • USPS Handbooks and Manuals
  • Materials Reference System (JCAM)
  • Joint Statement on Violence
  • ″Advanced Formal A and Beyond″ training program for the Contract Administration Unit, as well as the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).
  • Adjustments to the City Delivery Routes
  • difficulties with the workroom floor
  • CCA contractual concerns
  • and City Delivery resources are all addressed.
  • Employee Assistance Program for Safety and Health
  • Extreme weather conditions
  • Retirement Preparing to retire
  • already retired
  • maintaining membership while retired
  • retirement planning
  • Letter Carrier Political Fund for Retired Letter Carrier Workers
  • Publications that are useful
  • Injured on the job
  • Customer Connect

How Much Do Postal Workers Get Paid When They Retire?

The amount of annuity paid to postal workers is determined on their age and the number of years they have worked.Image courtesy of Comstock/Getty Images/Comstock/Getty Images As a result of the Postal Service’s severe financial situation, CBS News announced in June 2011 that the United States Postal Service was delaying pension plan payments to employees.Nonetheless, as of the time of publishing, retirees from the Postal Service were still eligible for all retirement plans, and postal workers were allowed to choose from a variety of different sources of retirement income.

The Civil Service Retirement System

The Civil Service Retirement System, sometimes known as the CSRS, is the government retirement income source for employees who began working at the United States Postal Service before 1984.Anyone who began working at the United States Postal Service after 1984 is presently covered by the Federal Employee Retirement System, also known as the FERS.The CSRS functions in a similar way to the FERS in that it is funded by employee contributions.The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) allows postal employees to make contributions of 7, 7 1/2, or 8 percent of their wages, with the post office matching their payments.

They are compelled to pay Medicare tax, but they are exempt from paying Social Security tax.

Federal Employee Retirement System

The Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS) is more well-known among post office employees who joined the system more recently.The Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) is divided into three parts: basic retirement payments, Social Security benefits, and a Thrift Savings Plan.Monthly, employees contribute their respective portions of their paychecks to the basic plan and Social Security, while the postal service contributes a sum equivalent to 1 percent of an employee’s basic salary to a Thrift Savings Plan on their behalf.Contributions to the Thrift Savings Plan, which will be matched by the United States Postal Service, are also permitted by employees.

After retirement, the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS) pays a monthly annuity.

Calculating CSRS Annuity

For more modern post office employees, the Federal Employee Retirement System is well known.Fundamental retirement benefits, Social Security benefits, and a Thrift Savings Plan are all provided through the Federal Employees Retirement System (FERS).Monthly, employees contribute their respective portions of their paychecks to the basic plan and Social Security, while the postal service contributes an amount equal to one percent of an employee’s basic pay to a Thrift Savings Plan on his or her behalf.Contributions to the Thrift Savings Plan, which will be matched by the postal service, can also be made by an employee.

After retirement, the Federal Employees’ Retirement System (FERS) pays a monthly annuity.

Calculating FERS Annuity

In addition, your High-3 salary is taken into consideration when calculating your FERS annuity.It is 1 percent of your High-3 pay if you are under the age of 62, or if you are beyond the age of 62 but have fewer than 20 years of service with the post office.Figure 1.1 percent of your High-3 income if you are 62 years old or older and have 20 years or more of post office service behind you.Reducing 5/12 of 1 percent from your annuity each month if you retire before the age of 62 and have worked for the post office for 10 years or more.

If you have 30 years of post office service or 20 years of service when you retire at the age of 60, there are no reductions in your pension.Figure 1 percent of your High-3 compensation if you have 20 years of service with the post office, and 1.1 percent of your High-3 salary if you have more than 20 years of service with the post office for calculating a disability pension beyond age 62.

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