How To Compile Package Body In Oracle?

To recompile the body of the emp_mgmt package in the schema hr, issue the following statement: ALTER PACKAGE hr. emp_mgmt COMPILE BODY; If Oracle Database encounters no compilation errors while recompiling the package body, then the body becomes valid.
How do I compile a Java package in Terminal? Step 1) Copy the code into an editor. Step 2) Save the file as Demo2.java. Compile the file using the command javac –d. Demo2.java. Step 3)Execute the code using the command java p3.c3. How do you compile all classes in Java? Run by typing java classname. For example, java smtpClient.

What is Oracle-compile packages procedures?

Oracle – Compile Packages Procedures Functions Contents Overview Compile Objects in an Oracle DB Compile Invalid Objects Compile Schema Two Phase Compilation of Invalid Objects Generate Statements Diagnostics and Handle Compilation Errors Overview If some code needs recompilation it done automatically recompiled when they are executed.

How do I compile a package body in SQL Developer?

Compiling a package body from a file. If you manage package body using files, you can compile the package body using the following command: @path_to_packge_body_file. In SQL Developer, you click the Run Script button to create a package body from a file.

What is a package body in PL SQL?

This package body includes the implementations of the two functions declared in the package specification. The process of compiling a package body is the same as compiling a package specification. From PL/SQL Developer, you click the Run Script button to compile the package body.

How do I compile a SQL body package?

Using the Oracle SQL Deverloper, I right-click on the package name, choose ‘edit body’, then update the body. Then I find that it seems there are several ways to update the package body: (1) click ‘run’ button. (2) click ‘compile’ button.

How do I run a package body in Oracle SQL Developer?

Go to VIEW menu, click on find DB objects option. In the find db object pane put the name of the package and select the DB. Both, the spec and body will appear, double click to open.

How do I compile invalid package body?

An alternative approach is to use the DBMS_DDL package to perform the recompilations. EXEC DBMS_DDL. alter_compile(‘PACKAGE’, ‘MY_SCHEMA’, ‘MY_PACKAGE’); EXEC DBMS_DDL. alter_compile(‘PACKAGE BODY’, ‘MY_SCHEMA’, ‘MY_PACKAGE’); EXEC DBMS_DDL.

Can we compile package body without specification?

Can we create a package body without specification? The package body won’t be usable until you compile a package specification for it.

How do I compile a new package in SQL Developer?

3 Answers

  1. expand the connection to the schema.
  2. right click on ‘Procedures’ (or ‘Functions’)
  3. in the context menu that pops up, chose ‘Compile All’
  4. if you wish, you can view the PL/SQL block that is going to be run by looking at the ‘SQL’ tab.
  5. press the ‘Apply’ button to recompile everything.

How do I create a package and package body in SQL Developer?

Follow these steps to create Package in Oracle SQL developer.

  1. On the left side in the connections pane, click on the Schema and expand the node.
  2. Then from the list of object types, select the Packages node.
  3. Do the right click on it and from the shortcut menu select New Package option.

What is difference between package and package body?

Introducing to the PL/SQL package body

A PL/SQL package consists of two parts: package specification and package body. If the package specification has cursors or subprograms, then the package body is mandatory. Otherwise, it is optional. Both the package body and package specification must be in the same schema.

What is package and package body in Oracle?

The package body defines these objects. The package specification, defined in an earlier CREATE PACKAGE statement, declares these objects. Packages are an alternative to creating procedures and functions as standalone schema objects.

How do you compile a procedure?

Compile one or more procedures, using one of these methods:

  1. Use the ALTER PROCEDURE or ALTER PACKAGE command to recompile the procedure or the entire package.
  2. Drop the procedure and create it again.
  3. Use CREATE OR REPLACE to recompile the procedure.

How do you compile a view?

SQL> SQL> SQL> create or replace view view_t as 2 select id view_id, data view_data 3 from t; View created. SQL> SQL> alter view view_t compile; View altered. SQL> SQL> SQL> drop table t; Table dropped.

Alter view to recompile : Alter View « View « Oracle PL / SQL

  1. Oracle PL / SQL.
  2. View.
  3. Alter View.

How do I compile an invalid object in Oracle?

Recompiling All Invalid Objects

  1. Start SQL*Plus: Copy sqlplus ‘/ AS SYSDBA’
  2. Run the utlrp.sql script, where Oracle_home is the Oracle home path: Copy SQL> @Oracle_home/rdbms/admin/utlrp.sql.

In which of these cases package body is necessary?

If the public items include cursors or subprograms, then the package must also have a body. The body must define queries for public cursors and code for public subprograms.

What is difference between procedure and package in Oracle?

A package is a group of related procedures and functions, together with the cursors and variables they use, stored together in the database for continued use as a unit. Similar to standalone procedures and functions, packaged procedures and functions can be called explicitly by applications or users.

Can you alter procedure with in package?

Because all objects in a package are stored as a unit, the ALTER PACKAGE statement recompiles all package objects. You cannot use the ALTER PROCEDURE statement or ALTER FUNCTION statement to recompile individually a procedure or function that is part of a package.

How to compile a package?

  • import package.*;
  • import package.classname;
  • fully qualified name.
  • What is Oracle package body?

  • Components of Packages
  • Package Specification
  • Package Body
  • Referring Package Elements
  • Create Package in PL/SQL
  • Forward Declarations
  • Cursors Usage in Package
  • Overloading
  • Dependency in Packages
  • Package Information
  • How to display package body in Oracle Database?

    – Package specification – Package body – Type specification – Type body – Function – Procedure

    Overview

    • If any code has to be recompiled, it is done automatically when the programs are performed.
    • You can use the ALTER PACKAGE statement to explicitly rebuild a package specification, body, or both with the ALTER PACKAGE statement in place.
    • In contrast to implicit run-time recompilation, explicit recompilation eliminates the requirement for run-time recompilation and prevents the related run-time compilation mistakes as well as performance overhead.
    • Alternatively to rebuilding distinct object types, you may compile them instead.
    • Examples of such object types are views, triggers, synonyms, packages, functions, and procedures.
    • Prerequisite: In order to compile, you will require the following permissions.
    • permit select on the dba tab cols array of values give select permissions on dba contraints

    Compile Objects in an Oracle DB

    • Compilation is possible for any sort of object.
    • Compile the following procedures: alter procedure pro util, alter function fun util, alter trigger tr bch trace, and alter view dab view.
    • Compile the following packages: alter package dab util, alter package dab util compile body, alter package dab util compile package, and alter view dab view.
    • Compile the following procedures: alter public synonym ‘object name’ compile EXEC DBMS UTILITY.compile schema

    Compile Invalid Objects

    Due to the fact that all objects in a package are stored as a single unit, the ALTER PACKAGE statement recompiles all of the objects in the package as a single unit of work. NOTE: You cannot use the ALTER PROCEDURE or ALTER FUNCTION statements to recompile a procedure or function that is part of a package on an individual basis using the ALTER PROCEDURE or ALTER FUNCTION statements.

    Compile Schema

    ExecDBMS UTILITY.COMPILE SCHEMA (‘FOO’, true); ExecDBMS UTILITY.COMPILE SCHEMA (‘FOO’, true);

    Two Phase Compilation of Invalid Objects

    Generate Statements

    • Compile incorrect objects using the spool compile invalid objects.sql SUBSTRUCT SELECT ‘alter package’ ||
    • owner ||.’ ||
    • object name ||
    • ‘compile package’ FROM dba objects WHERE status is ‘VALID’ and object type is ‘PACKAGE percent’ FROM dba objects NOTE: In order for you to be able to alter a package, the package must either be in your own schema or you must have the ALTER ANY PROCEDURE system permission.

    Diagnostics and Handle Compilation Errors

    • to find errors from the compilations do
    • show errors

    • Select * from dba errors where owner = ‘SYSADM’
    • select * from dba source where name = ‘CUST’
    • select * from dba source where owner = ‘SYSADM’
    • The owner’s name is typed in a line of text, and the system administrator (SYSADM) receives the package. cust wrapped 1 PACKAGE cust wrapped 0 abcd.
    • Owner, object name, object type, and status from dba objects where object name is one of the values (e.g., ‘CUSTOMER’, ‘CONTRACT’).
    • order by 2; OWNER OBJECT NAME OBJECT TYPE STATUS OWNER OBJECT NAME OBJECT TYPE STATUS OWNER OBJECT NAME OWNER OBJECT NAME OWNER OBJECT NAME OWNER OBJECT NAME OWNER OBJECT NAME OWNER OBJECT NAME OWNER OBJECT N SYSADM CONTRACT PACKAGE IS IN EXECUTION PACKAGE DE CONTRACTS SYSADM SYSADM CUSTPACKAGE VALID VALID VALID VALID VALID Take a look at these more resources: Oracle-Handle-Invalid-Objects Oracle-System-Views Status: Published on June 5, 2017 at 14:13:06 UTC.
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    PL/SQL Package Body

    Briefly summarized, you will learn how to build a PL/SQL package body using the CREATE PACKAGE BODY command in the following lesson.

    Introducing to the PL/SQL package body

    • There are two elements to a PL/SQL package, which are the package specification and the package body.
    • If the package specification includes cursors or subprograms, then the package body is required.
    • Otherwise, the package body is optional.
    • It is not required in any other case.
    • Both the package body and the package specification must be stored in the same schema for the package to be valid.
    • Every cursor or subprogram that is stated in the package specification must have a matching definition in the package body, otherwise the package will fail.
    • Beyond the implementation of the cursors and subprograms specified in the package specification, a package body may contain private elements that are only available within the package body and not to other packages.
    • An initialization section can be included in a package’s body, which comprises of statements that initialize public variables and do other one-time configuration activities.

    The startup portion of the program only executes once, the first time the package is invoked.A handler for exceptions can also be included in the code.

    Creating a package body

    • Using the Build PACKAGE BODY command, you may create a package body in the following ways: CREATEPACKAGE BODYIS | CREATEPACKAGE BODYIS | AS definitions and implementations [START WITH EXCEPTION] END
    • SQL (Structured Query Language) is the programming language used (sql) The following is the syntax: After the CREATE PACKAGE BODY keywords, you must first enter the package name that will be used. The name of the schema is completely optional. As a result, it is your schema by default.
    • Second, the OR REPLACE option either replaces the existing package body definition or does nothing if no such definition exists for the package body.
    • Third, the declarations of private items and the implementations of the public items specified in the package specification are contained between the AS and END keywords in the package specification. It is important to note that you can use either the IS or the AS keyword.
    • An illustration of how to construct the body of the order mgt package is provided in the following example: Create or replace the order mgmt package body with the get net value(p order id NUMBER) function to create or replace the order mgmt package body.
    • THE RETURN NUMBER IS THE ln net value NUMBER BEGIN SELECT SUM(unit price * quantity) INTO ln net value FROM order items END SELECT SUM(unit price * quantity) INTO ln net value FROM order items IN THE CASE WHERE order id equals p order id; EXCEPT IN THE CASE OF NO DATA FOUND, RETURN p order id.
    • IN THAT CASE, DBMS OUTPUTPUT.PUT LINE(SQLERRM); END get net value; FUNCTION GET NET VALUE BY CUSTOMER(p ccustomer ID NUMBER, ccustomer year NUMBER) THE RETURN NUMBER IS THE ln net value NUMBER BEGIN BY SELECTING SUM(quantity * unit price) FROM order items AND INSERTING IT INTO ln net value Orders for INNER JOIN APPLICATION OF (order id) RETURN p year WHERE extract(YEAR FROM order date) = p year AND customerid= p customer id AND status= gc shipped status; EXCEPTION WHERE no data found; RETURN ln net value THEN DBMS OUTPUT.PUT LINE(SQLERRM); END get net value by customer; END order mgmt; SQL (Structured Query Language) is used as the programming language for this program (sql) The implementations of the two functions defined in the package specification are contained within the body of the package.

    Compiling a package body

    Building a package body is similar to building a package specification in that both need compilation.

    PL/SQL Developer

    To build the package body, you must first launch PL/SQL Developer and then click the Run Script button.

    SQL*Plus

    If you’re using SQL*Plus to compile and create a package body, you’ll need to type the forward slash (/) as seen below:

    Compiling a package body from a file

    • Compiling package body if the package body is managed through files may be accomplished by using the following command: @path to packge body file SQL (Structured Query Language) is the programming language used (sql) To construct a package body from a file in SQL Developer, select the Run Script button from the toolbar.
    • Similarly, you may use the forward slash (/) to compile and generate a package body from a file asSQL > @path to package body file 2 / to compile and construct a package body from a file asSQL SQL (Structured Query Language) is the programming language used (sql)

    Calling functions from a package

    • When the following statement is executed, the order mgmt package’s get net value by customer method is invoked: SELECT order mgmt.get net value by customer FROM order mgmt.get net value by customer (1,2017) sales IN THE FORM OF a double; SQL (Structured Query Language) is the programming language used (sql) As a result, we have: In this article, you learned how to construct a package body by executing the CREATE PACKAGE BODY statement on the server.
    • Was this tutorial of use to you?

    ALTER PACKAGE

    • Purpose To explicitly rebuild a package specification, body, or both, the ALTER PACKAGE statement should be utilized.
    • In contrast to implicit run-time recompilation, explicit recompilation eliminates the requirement for run-time recompilation and prevents the related run-time compilation mistakes as well as performance overhead.
    • Because all of the objects in a package are stored as a single unit, the ALTER PACKAGE statement recompiles all of the items in the package as a single entity.
    • You cannot use the ALTER PROCEDURE or ALTER FUNCTION statements to recompile a procedure or function that is part of a package on an individual basis.
    • Keep in mind that this statement does not modify the declaration or definition of a previously defined or declared package.
    • The CREATE PACKAGE or the CREATE PACKAGE BODY statements, together with the OR REPLACE clause, can be used to redefine or redeclare a package.
    • Prerequisites In order for you to alter a package, the package must either be in your own schema or you must have the system privilege ALTER ANY PROCEDURE.
    • Syntax alter package = description of the illustration alter package.gifcompiler parameters clause = description of the illustration compiler parameters clause.gifSemantics schema = description of the illustration schema = description of the illustration schema Provide the name of the schema that contains the package.

    The package will be assumed to be in your own schema if you do not include a schema in your query.package Specify the name of the package that will be recompiled in this field.COMPILE If you want to recompile the package specification or body, you must specify COMPILE.It is necessary to use the COMPILE keyword.The Oracle Database loses all permanent compiler switch settings during recompilation, obtains them again from the session, and stores them at the conclusion of the compilation process.

    If you want to skip going through this step, use the REUSE SETTINGS clause.Recompiling the package results in compilation issues; in this case, Oracle Database returns an error and the body of the package remains unusable.The SQL*Plus command SHOW ERRORS can be used to display the compiler error messages that were generated.RECOMPILING Just THE PACKAGE SPECIFICATION SPECIFICATION specifies that only the package specification should be recompiled, regardless of whether it is faulty.It is possible that you may need to recompile a package specification in order to check for compilation issues after making changes to the specification.Any local objects that are dependent on the specification are invalidated when you recompile a package specification in Oracle Database.

    1. This includes procedures that call procedures or functions in the package that call procedures or functions in the specification.
    2. The specification of a package has an impact on the body of the package as well.
    3. If you later access one of these dependent objects without first explicitly recompiling it, Oracle Database recompiles it implicitly at run time, as described in the previous section.
    4. BODY If you provide BODY, just the package body will be recompiled, regardless of whether it is invalid.
    5. It is possible that you may need to recompile a package body after making changes to it.

    The recompilation of a package body has no effect on the validity of objects that are dependent on the package specification.When you recompile a package body, Oracle Database first checks to see whether any of the objects on which the body is dependent are invalid.If any of those objects are invalid, Oracle Database recompiles the package body.

    If Oracle Database is able to successfully recompile the body, the body is considered legitimate.No matter whether the package specification or the package body is invalid, specifying PACKAGE will recompile both the package specification and the package body, if one exists.This is the default behavior.Due to the recompilation of the package specification and body, dependent objects are invalidated and recompiled in the same way as they were for the packages SPECIFICATION and BODY, respectively.

    • Oracle Database Concepts provides more information on how Oracle Database manages dependencies among schema items, including those that are located in remote locations.
    • DEBUG Specify what you want to happen.
    • DEBUG is used to direct the PL/SQL compiler to create and save code that may be used by the PL/SQL debugger to debug the program.
    • When this clause is specified, it has the same impact as if the PLSQL DEBUG parameter was specified in the compiler parameters_ clause.
    • This clause behaves in the same way as it does for a function when applied to a package.
    1. Please refer to the ALTER FUNCTION for further information.
    2. compiler parameters clause.
    3. APPLY CURRENT SETTINGS This clause behaves in the same way as it does for a function when applied to a package.
    4. Please refer to the ALTER FUNCTION clause for further information.

    REMOVE AND REUSE SETTINGS.Examples Recompiling a Package: a few of illustrations ″Creating a Package: Example″ demonstrated how to explicitly recompile the specification and body of the hr.emp mgmt package using the following syntax: CHANGE THE PACKAGING emp mgmt The emp mgmt specification and body must be recompiled in order for emp mgmt to become valid.If Oracle Database experiences no compilation problems when recompiling the emp mgmt specification and body, then emp mgmt becomes valid.The user hr will be able to call or reference all package objects stated in the specification of emp mgmt in the future without the need for a run-time recompilation of the code.If recompiling emp mgmt results in compilation errors, Oracle Database will return an error and emp mgmt will stay inactive until the compilation errors are resolved.

    1. Oracle Database additionally invalidates any and all objects that are dependent on the emp mgmt procedure.
    2. If you later access one of these objects without explicitly recompiling it first, Oracle Database recompiles it implicitly at run time, unless you manually recompile it beforehand.
    3. To rebuild the body of the emp mgmt package in the schema hr, use the following command: recompile emp mgmt package body in schema hr Alter Package hr.emp mgmt COMPILE BODY; If no compilation issues are encountered when recompiling the package body, the package body is deemed legitimate by Oracle Database.
    4. The user hr will be able to call or reference all package objects stated in the specification of emp mgmt in the future without the need for a run-time recompilation of the code.

    If recompiling the body results in compilation issues, Oracle Database will produce an error notice and the body will remain ineligible for further use.It is not necessary for Oracle Database to invalidate dependant objects since this statement just recompiles the body, not the specification of emp mgmt, when it is executed.

    How to re-compile PL/SQL packages

      Oracle Database Tips by Donald BurlesonMay 17, 2015
    Question:  How do I recompile a set of PL/SQL packages? Answer:  The DBA will have to recompile a PL/SQL packages whenever there are changes to tables, views, sequences, and so on that the package procedures and functions reference. This is accomplished through the use of the CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGEform of the CREATE PACKAGE command. The format for the command is identical to that of the CREATE PACKAGE command. But be aware that all procedures, variables, and functions referenced in the CREATE PACKAGE command must be present in the CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY command, for if you just use the command with a single procedure or function you want altered, that will be the only object left in the body when you are finished. Perhaps with a future release we will be able to use the package definition as a link list, and this won’t be required. There is also an ALTER PACKAGE BODY command that is used only to recompile the package body. The format of the ALTER PACKAGE command follows. ALTER PACKAGE package_name COMPILE ; The DEBUG clause has been added to compile and store debugging information for the specified area of the package for the PL/SQL debugger. Also, see these related notes on re-compiling PL/SQL packages and stored procedures:

    Compile Invalid Packages in Oracle EBS Database

    When dependent packages become invalid, the functionality of EBS is disrupted. Whenever you are troubleshooting an E-Business Suite functional issue, always check to see if any packages have been updated, or if any have been rendered ineffective.

    Query to check invalids:

    • There are a few queries you must run in order to determine the status of the invalids.
    • Count the total number of invalids by selecting count(*) from dba objects where status=’INVALID’ and executing the query Invalids with schema information in the number of invalids col proprietor for a30 Objects that are invalid in the database, along with their owner’s name, are listed in col OWNER for a30 and col OBJECT NAME for a30.
    • select object name, owner from dba objects where status=’INVALID’ group by owner, object type; Objects that are invalid in the database, along with their owner’s name, are listed in col OBJECT NAME for a30.

    How to Compile Invalids

    Manual approach – Compile each package or package body manually.alter packagecompile body;alter packagecompile;Similarly, we can compile other object_type like VIEW, FUNCTION, SYNONYM, TRIGGER and MATERIALIZED VIEWUse the same above query to compile. alter procedurecompile;alter synonymcompile;alter trigger

    compile; DBMS_DDL Package method:EXEC DBMS_DDL.alter_compile(‘PACKAGE’, ‘MY_SCHEMA’, ‘MY_PACKAGE’);EBS 12.2 MethodSQL> exec AD_ZD.compile (‘XX_DETAIL_PKG’);PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.SQL> sho errorNo errors.SQL>utlrp.sql toolGoto $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin and run utlrp.sqlSQL> @utlrp.sqlEBS 12.2 best methods to compile entire SchemaSQL> EXEC UTL_RECOMP.recomp_serial(‘APPS’);PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.SQL>Compile Invalids with parallel threadSQL> EXEC UTL_RECOMP.recomp_parallel(10);Verify the Invalids   col OWNER for a30   col OBJECT_NAME for a30   set lines 1000   select object_name, owner from dba_objects where status=’INVALID’;

    Recompiling Invalid Schema Objects

    • Here is where you may find articles on miscellaneous topics. Upgrades, patches, and DDL modifications, among other things, can cause schema objects to become invalid. On-demand automated recompilation will revalidate the objects if the changes do not result in compilation errors. However, this might take an unreasonable amount of time to accomplish, especially in cases where complicated dependencies are present, so please be patient. As a result, it makes sense to recompile faulty objects in advance of receiving user requests. It also helps you to determine whether any changes have caused problems with your code base. This article describes multiple ways for recompiling schema objects that have been found to be incorrect. Identifying Invalid Objects
    • The Manual Approach
    • Custom Script
    • UTL RECOMP
    • utlrp.sql and utlprp.sql
    • DBMS UTILITY.compile schema
    • DBMS UTILITY.compile schema
    • DBMS UTILITY.compile schema
    • DBMS UTILITY.compile schema
    • DBMS UTIL

    Identifying Invalid Objects

    • Using the following query, the DBA OBJECTS view may be used to identify invalid objects in a database.
    • COLUMN object name is a name for an object.
    • A30 FORMAL FORMULA FROMdba objects, SELECT owner, object type, object name, and status from the table IN THE CASE WHERE the status is ″INVALID,″ ORDER BY the owner, the object type, and the object name; You can use this information to determine which of the recompilation methods listed below is most appropriate for you.

    The Manual Approach

    • Manual recompilation may be adequate for modest numbers of objects, depending on their complexity.
    • The compile syntax for numerous different object types is demonstrated in the following example.
    • ALTER PACKAGE my package COMPILE; ALTER PACKAGE my package ALTER PACKAGE my package THE BODY; ALTER PROCEDURE my procedure COMPILE; ALTER FUNCTION my function COMPILE; ALTER TRIGGER my trigger COMPILE It is important to note that the package body is built in the same manner as the package specification, with the addition of the term ″BODY″ at the end of each instruction.
    • Another option is to utilize the DBMS DDL package to execute the recompilations instead of the DBMS DDL package.
    • DBMS DDL.alter compile(‘PACKAGE’, ‘MY SCHEMA’, ‘MY PACKAGE’); DBMS DDL.alter compile(‘PACKAGE BODY’, ‘MY SCHEMA’, ‘MY PACKAGE’); DBMS DDL.alter compile(‘PROCEDURE’, ‘MY FUNCTION’, ‘MY PROCED

    Custom Script

    • In rare cases, you may be required to build a large number of invalid objects at the same time.
    • In order to recognize and compile the incorrect objects, a custom script may be written and executed.
    • It is shown in the following example how to identify and recompile incompatible packages and package bodies.
    • SERVEROUTPUT SHOULD BE SET TO 1000000.
    • IN THE CASE OF cur rec EXECUTE IMMEDIATE ‘ALTER PACKAGE ″″’ ||
    • cur rec.owner ||
    • ‘″.″ ||
    • cur rec.object name ||

    ‘″ COMPILE’; ELSE EXECUTE IMMEDIATE ‘ALTER PACKAGE ″’ ||cur rec.owner ||’″.″ ||cur rec.object name ||’″ COMPILE’ End with put line(cur rec.object type ||

    ″:’||cur rec.owner ||″: ″ ||cur rec.object name); End with end LOOP; End with END; END with end; END with end Using this strategy is acceptable if you just have a single job in mind, but keep in mind that depending on the sequence in which the objects are built, you may wind up compiling certain objects numerous times.It is usually preferable to utilize one of the Oracle-provided methods, because they take the code dependencies into consideration, rather than writing your own.

    UTL_RECOMP

    • When dealing with incorrect objects, it is possible that you may have to build a large number of them at once. Creating a custom script to recognize and compile the incorrect objects is one method of addressing this issue. It is shown in the following example how to identify and recompile incompatible packages and package bodies: ASSIGN THE SIZE 1000000 TO SERVEROUTPUT WITHIN cur rec, BEGIN WITH IN (SELECT owner, object name, object type, DECODE(object type, ‘PACKAGE’, 1, ‘PACKAGE BODY’, 2, 3) AS recompile order FROMdba objects WHEREobject type IN (‘PACKAGE’, ‘PACKAGE BODY’) ANDstatus!= ‘VALID’ ORDER BY 4) LOOP BEGIN IF cur rec.object type = ‘ End with put line(cur rec.object type || ″:’|| cur rec.owner || ″: ″ || cur rec.object name)
    • End with end LOOP
    • End with / End with put line Using this strategy is acceptable if you just have a single job in mind, but keep in mind that depending on the sequence in which objects are built, you may wind up compiling certain objects numerous times. As a rule of thumb, it is preferable to utilize one of the Oracle-provided methods since they take the code dependencies into consideration.
    • The following examples demonstrate the application of these processes. – At the schema level. EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp serial(‘SCOTT’)
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel(4, ‘SCOTT’)
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel(4, ‘SCOTT’)
    • – At the level of the database. EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp serial()
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel(4)
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp serial()
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel(4)
    • Making use of the job queue processes variable. EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel()
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel(NULL, ‘SCOTT’)
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel(NULL, ‘SCOTT’)
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel(NULL, ‘SCOTT’)
    • EXEC UTL RECOMP.recomp parallel( There are a number of limitations connected with the usage of this package, including the following: The job queue is used to perform parallel execution of tasks. Until the process is completed, all currently running jobs are marked as disabled.
    • SYSDBA or another user with SYSDBA permissions must be used to execute the package from SQL*Plus.
    • A valid STANDARD, DBMS STANDARD, DBMS JOB, and DBMS RANDOM is required by the package
    • otherwise, the package will fail.
    • It is possible that running DDL operations at the same time as this package will result in deadlocks.

    utlrp.sql and utlprp.sql

    • These scripts, utlrp.sql and utlprp.sql, are given by Oracle and are used to rebuild any incorrect objects that have been found in the database. After significant database changes, such as upgrades or patches, they are frequently executed. They may be found in the $ORACLE HOME/rdbms/admin directory and act as a wrapper for the UTL RECOMP package, which is installed by default. It is merely a matter of calling another script with the command line argument of ″0″ in the utlrp.sql script. There is a single integer argument that denotes the amount of parallelism that may be sent to the utlprp.sql, which is as follows. In the case of a 0, the level of parallelism is determined by the CPU COUNT parameter
    • in the case of a 1, the level of parallelism is determined by the CPU COUNT parameter
    • and in the case of a 2, the level of parallelism is determined by the CPU COUNT parameter.
    • If 1 is selected, the recompilation is carried out sequentially, one object at a time
    • N is selected, the recompilation is carried out in parallel with ″N″ number of threads

    Both scripts must be executed as the SYS user, or as another user with the SYSDBA privilege, in order to function properly.

    DBMS_UTILITY.compile_schema

    • The COMPILE SCHEMA operation, which is part of the DBMS UTILITY package, compiles all procedures, functions, packages, and triggers that are included inside the given schema. The following example demonstrates how it may be accessed via SQL*Plus. EXEC DBMS UTILITY.compile schema(schema => ‘SCOTT’, compile all => false)
    • For more information, see UTL RECOMP
    • DBMS UTILITY.compile schema
    • UTL RECOMP
    • DBMS UTILITY.compile schema
    • UTL RECOMP
    • DBMS UTILITY.compile schema
    • UTL RECOM

    I hope this has been of assistance. With best wishes, Tim Return to the top of the page.

    how to compile all procedures with standard format in oracle sql developer

    • When it comes to source control, the ‘best’ way to look at things is via it, and preferably the source of truth is a subversion or Git project.
    • The FORMAT command allows you to pass all of the files in a directory into our command-line interface.
    • It will then go through each file in that folder, format the code, and send it to the output directory that has been specified in the command.
    • After that, you would check those files into your source control management system.
    • c:Program FilesOraclesqldev18.1sqldevelopersqldeveloperbin>sdcli format input=c:usersjdsmithunformatted output=c:usersjdsmithformatted c:Program FilesOraclesqldev18.1sqldevelopersqldeveloperbin>sdcli format input=c:user The command has been completed.
    • So I move from three unformatted files to three formatted files, and if I open the same ‘object’ before and after, I get the same result.
    • All of this is great, but keep in mind that as soon as another developer looks at a file, they will quickly modify the way it appears according to their own personal tastes.
    • In my experience, I’ve never seen a good ″formatting guidelines″ system where everyone agrees that the code should be formatted the same way.

    However, formatting it in the manner in which it appears in your VCS appears to function OK.as well as DIFFs/Deltas, which will be beneficial.In theory, you could also write some JavaScript and utilize SQLcl to capture each item, format it, and then compile it all together.Here are a few illustrations.I’m not a fan of the notion of assembling things without first inspecting them, but that’s just my opinion.

    How to Create Package in Oracle SQL Developer?

    To build a package in Oracle SQL Developer, follow the procedures shown below.

    1. Click on the Schema node in the connections pane on the left-hand side of the screen to enlarge it.
    2. Then, from the list of object types, choose the Packages node
    3. and so on.
    4. Make a right-click on it and then pick the New Package option from the shortcut menu that appears.
    5. Afterwards, a Create Package window will be displayed
    6. In the Name area, enter the name of the package you’re creating.
    7. When you are finished, click on the OK button, and the package will be shown in the SQL editor. An example of package code is shown below.
    • TO CREATE OR REPLACE THE PACKAGE EMP PACKAGE, DO SO AS FOLLOWS: /* TODO: fill in the blanks with package declarations (types, exceptions, methods, and so on) */ END EMP PACKAGE; The information in the preceding section is a specification for the package.
    • To build a package body, open a new SQL editor window and type the package body into it, as shown in the following illustration.
    • Create or replace the package body EMP PACKAGE with the following: /* TODO: insert package definitions (such as types, exceptions, methods, etc) here */ END EMP PACKAGE; CREATE OR REPLACE THE PACKAGE

    See also:

    • What is the process of creating a procedure in Oracle SQL Developer?
    • How to Make Changes to a Procedure in Toad

    Vinish Kapoor

    In addition, she is the founder of foxinfotech.in and orclqa.com, both of which serve as a question and answer forum for developers.

    CREATE PACKAGE BODY

    • Purpose Build PACKAGE BODY is used to create the body of a stored package, which is a collection of related procedures, stored functions, and other program objects that are all saved in the same database. These items are defined in the package body. These objects are declared in the package specification, which was specified in a previous CREATE PACKAGE declaration. Create procedures and functions as separate schema objects is an option, however packages are a better solution. Prerequisites To build a package, the user SYS must first execute a SQL script known as DBMSSTDX.SQL, which is readily found on the Internet. According on your operating system, the actual name and location of this script will vary. It is necessary to have the Construct PROCEDURE system privilege in order to create a package in your own schema. It is necessary to have system privileges to Construct ANY PROCEDURE in order to create a package in another user’s schema. If you want to include a CREATE PACKAGE BODY statement within an Oracle Database precompiler program, you must terminate the statement with the keyword END-EXEC followed by the embedded SQL statement terminator for the language in which the statement is being used. Syntax the description of the graphic create package body.gif is equal to the name of the package. OR REPLACE WITH SEMANTICS The OR REPLACE option can be used to re-create the package body if one already exists. Use this clause to make changes to the body of an existing package without having to discard, recreate, and re-grant object rights that were previously given to the package in question. If you make changes to the body of a package, Oracle Database will recompile it. Individuals who have previously been granted privileges on a redefined package can continue to access the package without having to request that the privileges be provided to them again. For more information on recompiling package bodies, see ALTER PACKAGE (see Resources). schema Provide the name of the schema that will include the package. Unless you provide a schema, the database will generate the package using your existing schema. package You must provide a name for the package that is to be generated. pl/sql package body Specification of a package’s body, which may comprise PL/SQL subprogram bodies or call specifications, which are declarations of a C or Java procedure that has been defined in PL/SQL, is required. Examples Creating a Package Body: An Illustration This SQL query constructs the body of the emp mgmt package, which was built in the previous section, ″Creating a Package: Example.″ The following PL/SQL code is given in italics: PACKAGE BODY CREATION OR REPLACEMENT tot emps NUMBER
    • tot depts NUMBER
    • emp mgmt AS tot emps NUMBER
    • FUNCTION Hire (last name VARCHAR2, job id VARCHAR2, manager id NUMBER, salary NUMBER, commission pct NUMBER, department id NUMBER) (last name VARCHAR2, job id VARCHAR2, salary NUMBER, commission pct NUMBER, department id NUMBER) NEW EMPNO NUMBER IS RETURNED
    • BEGIN SELECT employees seq.NEXTVAL INTO new empno FROM DUAL
    • INSERT INTO employees VALUES (new empno, ‘First’, ‘Last’, ‘(123)123-1234′,’IT PROG’,90000000,00, 100,110)
    • tot emps:= tot emps + 1
    • create dept(department id NUMBER, location id NUMBER) is a function that creates a department. THE RETURN NUMBER IS THE new deptno NUMBER
    • BEGIN BY SELECTING departments seq.NEXTVAL FROM new deptno NUMBER
    • PROCEDURE remove emp (employee id NUMBER) IS BEGIN DELETE FROM employees WHERE employees. FROM dual
    • INSERT INTO departments VALUES (new deptno, ‘department name’, 100, 1700)
    • tot depts:= tot depts + 1
    • RETURN(new deptno)
    • END
    • PROCEDURE remove emp (employ employee id = remove emp.employee id
    • tot emps:= tot emps – 1
    • END
    • PROCEDURE remove dept(department id NUMBER) IS BEGIN DELETE FROM departments WHERE departments is a subset of departments. employees
    • END
    • PROCEDURE increase sal(employee id NUMBER, salary incr NUMBER) IS curr sal NUMBER
    • BEGIN SELECT salary INTO curr sal FROM employees WHERE employees.department id = remove dept.department id
    • tot depts = tot depts – 1
    • SELECT COUNT(*) INTO to employees.employee id = increase sal.employee id
    • IF curr sal IS NULL, THEN raise no sal
    • ELSE UPDATE employees SET salary = salary + salary incr AND employee id = employee id
    • END
    • PROCEDURE increase comm(employee id NUMBER, comm incr NUMBER) = cur the employee id variable is equal to the increase comm.the employee id variable
    • IF curr comm IS NULL, THEN RAISE no comm
    • ELSE UPDATE employees with the commission pct variable equal to the commission pct + comm incr variable
    • END
    • THE package body defines the public program objects declared in the package specification: The hire and create department functions
    • Removal of employees and departments, as well as a rise in salary and communication.
    • These objects are defined in the package specification, which means they may be accessed by application programs, procedures, and functions that are not part of the package specification.
    • Example: If you have access to the package, you can build a procedure increase all_______ that calls the increase comm procedure, which is distinct from the emp mgmt package and calls the increase comm procedure.
    • You can update the definitions of these objects because they are declared in the package body rather than in the package header, which prevents Oracle Database from invalidating dependent schema objects.
    • For example, if you modify the definition of hire later on, the database will not need to recompile increase all comms before running it because it already has.
    • In this example, the package body additionally declares two private program objects, which are denoted by the variables tot emps and tot depts.
    • The fact that these objects are declared in the package body rather than the package specification means that they are available to other objects inside the package, but they are not accessible from outside the package, and they are not accessible from other packages.
    • For example, you are unable to create an application that modifies the value of the variable tot depts in an explicit manner.
    • However, because the method create dept is included in the package, the value of tot depts can be changed by the function create dept.

    Oracle compiled PL/SQL

    PL/SQL code is compiled in its native form.By default, PL/SQL code is compiled and saved in the form of byte code, which is ready for execution when the program is run.In the course of the execution process, this byte code is translated into machine language, a process that consumes both time and resources.A stored procedure written in PL/SQL is converted to Pro*C, which is then compiled into native code shared libraries, resulting in performance improvements for the procedural code written in Pro*C.The amount of speed improvement achieved depends on the substance of the PL/SQL code, with the greatest results obtained in code that has a large number of loops, logic, and mathematical operations, as well as a little amount of database work.Depending on the version of Oracle being utilized, different configurations are necessary for native compilation.

    Oracle 9i requires the setting of various parameters, and on some systems, the accompanying makefile may require modification.Oracle 10g, on the other hand, has rendered some options obsolete, and the corresponding makefile seldom requires modification.- Oracle 9i installation and configuration.- Oracle 10g installation.ALTER SYSTEM SET plsql native make utility =’make’; ALTER SYSTEM SET plsql native make file name = ‘/u01/app/oracle/product/9.2.0/plsql/spnc makefile.mk’; ALTER SYSTEM SET plsql native library dir = ‘/u01/ ALTER SYSTEM SET plsql native library dir = ‘/u01/oradata/DB10G/native’ ALTER SYSTEM SET plsql native library dir = ‘/u01/oradata/DB10G/native’ It is important to note that the shared libraries are stored in a database-specific directory in order to avoid conflicts when many instances of the application are running on the same server.

    Once these criteria have been established, The compilation style can be changed by altering the values of session or instance level settings, respectively.- The move to Oracle 9i.ALTER SESSION SET plsql compiler flags = ‘INTERPRETED’; ALTER SESSION SET plsql compiler flags = ‘NATIVE’; ALTER SYSTEM SET plsql compiler flags = ‘INTERPRETED’; ALTER SYSTEM SET plsql compiler flags = ‘NATIVE’; ALTER SYSTEM Alter the session by setting plsql code type to ‘INTERPRETED’; Alter the session by setting plsql code type to ‘NATIVE’; Alter the system by setting plsql code type to ‘INTERPRETED’; Alter the system by setting plsql code type to ‘NATIVE’; Alter the session by setting plsql code type to ‘INTERPRETED’; Alter the system by setting pls Using the test speed.sql script, we will be able to develop a process that will be used to measure the performance improvements associated with native compilation.test speed.sql PROCEDURE DEVELOPMENT OR REPLACEMENT test speed AS l number NUMBER; BEGIN FOR I IN 1; 1000000 LOOP l number:= I / 1000; END LOOP; END; / SHOW ERRORS; END; / Using the script native comp test.sql, we can see how fast each method is compared to the others once the procedure has been built.———————————————————————————————————- – Notes: – When using 9i, use plsql compiler flags instead of plsql compiler flags.———————————————————————————————————- – ALTER SESSION SET plsql compiler flags = ‘INTERPRETED’; ALTER SESSION SET plsql code type = ‘INTERPRETED’; ALTER PROCEDURE test speed = ‘INTERPRETED’; ALTER PROCEDURE test speed = ‘INTERPRETED’ COMPILE; PROMPT Interpreted; EXEC test speed; SET TIMING OFF; COMPILE; PROMPT Interpreted; SET TIMING OFF The following modifications were made to the session: ALTER SESSION set plsql compiler flags = ‘NATIVE’; ALTER SESSION set plsql code type = NATIVE; ALTER PROCEDURE test speed COMPILE; INSTRUCTIONS FOR NATIVE EXEC test speed with timing enabled; EXEC test speed with timing disabled.

    The script’s output demonstrates that the natively built code is significantly quicker.SQL> @native comp test.sql is a SQL query.The session has been changed.

    • The procedure has been changed.
    • The PL/SQL operation that was being interpreted was successfully completed.
    • The time has passed at 00:00:00.74.
    • The session has been changed.
    • The procedure has been changed.
    • The native PL/SQL operation has been successfully executed.
    • The time has passed at 00:00:00.66.
    • The test speed method may be recreated with the help of the test speed 2.sql script, allowing us to observe the impact of native compilation of code including database calls on performance.
    • test speed 2.sql PROCEDURE TEST SPEED SHOULD BE CREATED OR REPLACED l date is an example of a date.
    • THE DATE; INITIALIZE FOR I IN 1.
    1. 1000000 LOOP SELECT SYSDATE FROM l date IN 1.
    2. IN FROM dual; END LOOP; END; / DISPLAY ERRORS When you rerun the native comp test.sql once you have recreated the procedure, you will see the following results.
    3. SQL> @native comp test.sql is a SQL query.
    4. The session has been changed.
    • The procedure has been changed.
    • The PL/SQL operation that was being interpreted was successfully completed.
    • 00:01:22.03 seconds have elapsed.
    • The session has been changed.
    • The procedure has been changed.
    • The native PL/SQL operation has been successfully executed.
    • The time has passed at 00:01:19.32.
    • Again, natively compiled code is quicker than interpreted code, but the differences are attributable to the procedural code rather than to database calls.
    • By default, all shared libraries are kept in the same directory, which might be an issue when there are a large number of natively generated objects on the system.

    The threshold at which difficulties can develop varies depending on the platform and the source providing the data, but the lowest figure I’ve seen indicates that files in excess of 5,000 in size can cause issues.The plsql native library subdir count system-level parameter circumvents this problem by instructing Oracle to distribute the shared libraries in the specified number of subdirectories.This parameter is set at the system level.

    • There must be at least one directory named ″dn″ in the directory pointed to by the plsql native library dir argument, and the names of the directories must be in the form ″dn″, where ″n″ is the directory number in the zero-based directory numbering system.
    • The majority of publications recommend working with a subdirectory count of 1,000 or less, and the following script can be used to construct a directory creation script for your needs.
    • SET SERVEROUTPUT ON SIZE 1000000 SPOOL mkdir cmd file mkdir cmd file mkdir cmd file BEGIN FOR I IN 0.999 LOOP DBMS OUTPUT.put line(‘mkdir d’ ||
    • TO CHAR(i)); END FOR I IN 0.999 LOOP DBMS OUTPUT.put line(‘mkdir d’ ||
    1. TO CHAR(i)); SPOOL OFF; LOOP; END; / SPOOL OFF As soon as the subdirectories have been created, the parameter may be adjusted to the suitable value for them.
    2. CHANGE THE SYSTEM SET plsql native library subdir count=1000; However, it is possible to natively compile the whole database, including the objects held by the SYS schema; however, this should only be done after reading and following the necessary Oracle Technology Network notice, since it might result in serious difficulties if done wrong.
    3. For Oracle 9i, the procedure was detailed in the following document, which was available at the time of writing: In Oracle 10g, the built shared libraries are now kept in the database and are only extracted to the file system when they are no longer needed.
    4. These servers are included in the standard backup and recovery process, require no additional manual maintenance, and are available in Real Application Cluster (RAC) setups, among other things, Native compilation of the package specification and body are independent of one another, which means that either one, or both, can be natively built at the same time without affecting the other.

    In the following part, we will look at one method of concealing performance issues from end users, which is to decouple processes.Oracle 10g and later versions of PL/SQL compilation Mike Ault is a songwriter and musician from the United Kingdom.Beginning with Oracle 10g, PL/SQL may be turned into native code, as we previously discussed.The compiling, together with general advances in PL/SQL compilation, can result in a speedup of PL/SQL execution of increase to 60% in some instances.PL/SQL code is accepted as input by a special makefile program, which compiles it into natively executable C code on most Oracle systems.For those who don’t know, Oracle is written in C, and Oracle executables are written in C as well as other programming languages.

    Another advantage of generating PL/SQL is that it saves time.For improved concurrency, the generated code that corresponds to the PL/SQL program is assigned to a PGA rather than an SGA in the database.Native compilation can make PL/SQL that does not contain SQL references 2-10 times quicker than it would otherwise be.Turning on native PL/SQL compilation, on the other hand, is not straightforward.It is necessary to include the appropriate links in a special file known as a makfile in order to enable native compilation.Prcmake.bat is the make file for Oracle 10g running on Windows, and it can be found in the c:oracleora90plsqldemo directory.

    1. Here’s a breakdown of the prcmake.bat file to give you a sense of how complicated it is: @echo off Rem PL/SQLRem blocks contained in C code are generated by this script, which may be used to generate executables for the demo scripts.
    2. To produce all executables, type the following at the prompt: Rem Environment Verify: if (percent MSVCDir percent) == () then move to msvcdir error.
    3. in the event that (percent 1) == () proceed to usageecho Proc iname= percent 1.pc sqlcheck=FULL CHAR MAP=VARCHAR2, DBMS=V7 ireclen=132 parse = full sqlcheck=SEMANTICS This makefile requires that demos are installed as user scott.
    4. proc iname= percent 1.pc sqlcheck=FULL user=scott/tiger cl -I percent ORACLE HOME percent ociinclude -I percent MSVCDir percent ociinclude -I percent MSVCDir percent mfcinclude -D MT -Zi percent 1.c /link -I percent MSVCDir percent mfcinclude -D MT -Zi percent 1.c /link percent ORACLE HOME percent ocilibmsvcoci.lib percent ocilibmsvcoci.lib /libpath: percent ORACLE HOME percent precomplibmsvcorasql9.lib /libpath: percent MSVCDIR percent /libpath: percent MSVCDir percent /libpath: percent MSVCDir percent /libpath: msvcrt.lib /nod:libcmt msvcrt.lib msvcdir error is at the end of the list.
    • echo.echo Variable in the environment MSVCDIR must be established before this batchfile can be executed.
    • echo Please execute the vcvars32.bat file located in the MS Visual Studio directory.
    • end:usage echo.goto end:usage echo.echo prcmake filename.pc is used in this program.
    • echo.:end As we can see in this example, the prcmake command receives as an input argument the name of the PL/SQL function or procedure.

    The configuration of these makefiles may be fairly involved as seen above, and even an experienced Oracle database administrator may require several days to have the compiler configured and operating properly.Anyhow, after you get the makefile functioning, you must run the following Oracle instructions to enable native PL/SQL compilation in order to run the program.Connection to pubs/pubs as sysdba; modify system set plsql compiler flags=NATIVE; alter system set plsql native library dir=’c:oracleora90lib’; alter system set plsql native make utility=’prcmake’; alter system set plsql native make file name=’c:oracle It is possible to compile PL/SQL procedures and functions into native C code rather than interpreting them as byte code, starting with Oracle 10g.After that, it is saved as a shared library in the file system of the computer.

    • Compiling a PL/SQL function or procedure is a straightforward process that follows these steps: Because of the absence of the overhead involved with interpreting byte code, compiling PL/SQL programs leads in quicker execution of PL/SQL programs.
    • In addition, native code executes more quickly than interpreted code, hence compiling results in faster control flow.
    • For further information, see the ″Easy Oracle Series,″ a collection of publications written by Oracle specialists to help you get started with Oracle database technology as quickly as possible.

    *****************************************

    Use PL/SQL Native Compilation in 9i Mike Ault

    • Internal stored packages and procedures can be converted into built shared C libraries on the host server using the native compilation option in Oracle9i. This native compilation has the potential to lower code execution time by a factor of up to four. The packages and procedures are built as native C routines and then linked into the Oracle source code to perform their functions. This new option in Oracle9i is best useful for PL/SQL that is computationally heavy, and it should not be utilized for PL/SQL that does a significant amount of SQL processing. This method should be followed in order to accelerate one or more operations utilizing this technique: Make changes to the makefile that was provided, and insert the relevant paths and other variables for your system. This makefile may be found at the following location: $ORACLE HOME/plsql/spnc makefile.mk. If you want to add the value NATIVE in the PLSQL COMPILER FLAGS parameter, you may use the ALTER SYSTEM or ALTER SESSION command, or you can amend your startup file. The value INTERPRETED is included in the default configuration, and you must remove this keyword from the parameter value to make it work. Compile one or more procedures by employing one of the following approaches: You can recompile a procedure or an entire package by using the ALTER PROCEDURE or ALTER PACKAGE commands.
    • Use CREATE OR REPLACE to recompile the procedure
    • drop the procedure and recreate it once again.
    • One of the SQL*Plus scripts that configures a collection of Oracle-supplied packages should be executed.
    • Using a pre-configured startup file and the PLSQL COMPILER FLAGS=NATIVE parameter, create a database.
    • As part of the database construction process, the UTLIRP script is executed to build all of the Oracle-supplied packages.
    • When in doubt about whether the process was successful, you may check the data dictionary to discover whether or not a procedure has been built for native execution. In order to determine if a previously created procedure has been compiled for native execution or not, you may perform a query on the data dictionary view USER STORED SETTINGS, DBA STORED SETTINGS, and ALL STORED SETTINGS. For example, you may input the following to check the status of the process MY PROC: SELECT param value FROM user stored settings (parameter value). ORDER BY param name = ‘PLSQL COMPILER FLAGS’ WHERE object name = ‘MY PROC’
    • The PARAM VALUE column has the value NATIVE for procedures that have been compiled for native execution, and the value INTERPRETED for procedures that have not. As soon as the procedures are built and made into shared libraries, they are instantly linked into the operating system’s Oracle instance. There is no need to restart the database or relocate the shared libraries to a new place. You may switch back and forth between stored procedures, regardless of whether they are all built in the default mode (interpreted), all compiled for native execution, or a combination of the two approaches. Because the PLSQL COMPILER FLAGS setting is stored within the library unit for each procedure, procedures that are compiled for native execution are compiled in the same way when the procedure is recompiled automatically after being invalidated, such as when a table on which the procedure depends is recreated, or when a table that the procedure depends on is deleted. The behavior of PL/SQL native compilation can be controlled through the ALTER SYSTEM or alter session commands, or by setting or changing the following parameters in the initialization file: PLSQL COMPILER FLAGS
    • PLSQL NATIVE LIBRARY DIR (which cannot be set by alter session for security reasons)
    • PLSQL NATIVE LIBRARY SUBDIR COUNT
    • PLSQL NATIVE MAKE UTILITY

    Figure 3 illustrates an example of how to compile a PL/SQL Procedure for Native Execution using the PL/SQL compiler.Create or replace procedure hello native compilation as begin dbms output.put line(‘Hello World’); select sysdate from dual; end; connect scott/tiger; set serveroutput on; alter session set plsql native library dir=’/home/orauser/lib’; alter session set plsql native make utility=’gmake’; alter session set plsql_ Figure 3: An illustration of how Native Compilation may be used.The different compilation and link instructions are run as the procedure is being compiled, as can be seen in the following screenshot.The method is immediately ready for use and runs as a shared library right within the Oracle process, making it extremely convenient to use.

    Limitations of Native Compilation

    In order for a package specification to be built for native execution, the accompan

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