The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success?

The three factors that make up the triple package and determine success, Chua and Rubenfeld argue, are insecurity (outsiderdom), a sense of superiority and good impulse control, which together make up a puritan mindset long ago abandoned by white Protestant America – a section of the population that now has below-
Triple Package contends that success is driven not by inborn biology, but is instead propelled by qualities that can be cultivated by all Americans. The book serves as an opportunity to discuss what has helped drive America’s triumphs in the past – and how we might harness this knowledge for our future.’

The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success – review

Asian-Americans account for around 5 percent of the college-age population in the United States, and 19 percent of Harvard’s undergraduate enrollment.At Yale, this ratio is 16 percent of the student body.Princeton has a 19 percent graduation rate.

  1. The authors of The Triple Package point out that a staggering 40% of undergraduates are Asian-American at the California Institute of Technology, where admissions are completely based on test results rather than a combination of scores and more opaque criteria, as opposed to other universities.
  2. Trying to figure out why this would be the case is a dangerous endeavor that is likely to result in immediate and vociferous charges of racism.
  3. This is precisely what happened in the lead-up to the publication of this book in the United States, when it was variously described as ″a despicable new theory″ of ″racial superiority″ (Salon), advocating a ″racist argument″ (New York Post), and possessing ″uncomfortable racist overtones″ (New York Times) (Forbes magazine).
  4. Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld, both Yale law professors, are the writers of this book.
  • They are married and have two children.
  • Chen Chua is the author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, a New York Times best-selling explication and defense of rigorous Asian-American parenting methods.
  • Using other ″cultural groups″ in the United States as examples, this book examines Mormonism, Cuban culture, Nigerian culture, Jews culture, Indian culture, Lebanon culture, and Iranian culture.
  • These are all groups that, by conventional measures of success, are disproportionately represented at the top of league tables.
  1. In reaction to this new book, some have expressed concern that, given the abuses to which this type of information has previously been subjected, it is never permissible to aggregate data and correlate ethnicity with performance – which is ludicrous.
  2. The behavior of groups is a genuine academic issue, and it is certain that it is possible to investigate this topic without resorting to prejudices that are racist in nature.
  3. The validity of the authors’ explanation for why some groups thrive is debatable, and it is a problem with this type of book that the marketing hook – in this case, the ″triple package,″ a clunky phrase the authors chose ″for lack of a less terrible name″ – is often too flimsy or too broad to be meaningful, as is the case with this book.
  4. They argue that insecurity (outsiderdom), a sense of superiority, and good impulse control all combine to form a puritan mindset that has long since been abandoned by white Protestant America – a segment of the population that now has below-average wealth – and are the three factors that make up the triple package and determine success.

The attitude of recent immigrants from specific regions of the world is advantageous, and it may be found among certain groups of immigrants.This is an issue that is only briefly addressed in the book (as is whether it provides happiness or not).When compared to other immigrant groups, the upward mobility of certain immigrant groups is astounding.

  • Consequently, ″Indian Americans have the greatest income of any census-tracked ethnic group, over double the national average,″ according to the Census Bureau.
  • Nigerian Americans make up only 0.7 percent of the black population in the United States, yet they account for ten times the number of black students enrolled in university in the United States.
  • Mormons make approximately 1.7 percent of the population and hold ″ten times more Florida real estate than the Walt Disney organization,″ according to the Associated Press.
  • According to the writers, the Church of England had assets of around $6.9 billion (£4.2 billion) in 2008.
  • It was worth four times as much even ten years earlier when the Mormon religion was founded.
  • However, although the Mormons are not immigrants, according to Chua and Rubenfeld, they share the same combination of internalised superiority that comes from believing they have been ″chosen,″ rigorous self-denial, and a social ambition motivated by being outside the mainstream that many immigrants do.

The result is most visible on Wall Street: the chief executives or chief financial officers of Marriott, American Express, Citigroup, Deloitte, Sears and Roebuck, and a handful of other corporations are all Mormons, according to the authors, who speculate that they are sensitive to skepticism about their religion and motivated by a desire to demonstrate their worth to their superiors.To be sure, all of this seems plausible, as does the reality that upward mobility is mostly exhausted after three generations of being born.″Assimilation and prosperity lessen the anxieties and other cultural pressures that propelled the first and second generations to the top of the social ladder.″ ″America,″ the authors add, ″is the world’s greatest destroyer of impulse control.″ As an illustration, ″from 1950 to 1990, Jewish high school students accounted for almost 20% of the finalists in the coveted, countrywide Intel Science Talent Search; since 2010, they have accounted for barely 7%.″ There are a plethora of others.The fact that Chua and Rubenfeld are members of two of the eight groups on which the book is focused gives them the freedom to make statements that other authors would be hesitant to make, such as: ″Asians are now so overrepresented at Ivy League schools that they are being referred to as the ‘new Jews.’″ Chua and Rubenfeld are also members of the Asian American Studies Association.They do this with a wry grin on their faces, knowing full well that it will result in a fainting spell, and they are suitably scornful of flimsy theories of causality.It is not because they come from a ″education culture,″ as is commonly stated – with the corollary being that less successful groups come from ″indolent cultures″ – that the Chinese are successful, but rather because of a variety of wider-ranging contextual factors, including the fact that ″Chinese kids are typically raised on a diet of stories about how Chinese civilisation is the oldest and most magnificent in world history.″ As a result of their efforts to provide adequate window-dressing to increase sales, the writers deviate from academic rigor to lightweight anecdotal evidence in a manner that undermines much of their credibility.

  1. From the financial collapse to David Blaine standing on a plinth, news events are fed into the sausage machine of the Triple Package argument, resulting in lame-sounding suggestions such as disgraced financier Bernie Madoff exemplifying the ″triple package disease″ characterized by ″insatiable desire.″ Alternatively, he may simply be a narcissist.
  2. Who knows?
  3. I would be wary of basing judgments about Jewish identity on Greg Bellow’s cross-generational biography of his father, Saul Bellow’s Heart, which appears to be muddied by a slew of other considerations.
  1. A quote from ″one 23-year-old Indian American professional″ who was talking about ethnic anxiety in a chatroom appears to be the result of a Google search on ethnic anxiety.
  2. This, as with so many other books on ideas, is suggestive of the fact that The Triple Package could have covered the same territory in half the amount of pages it took to write it.
  3. However, there is still a great deal to be discovered.
  4. The Amish are known for their amazing ″impulse control,″ yet they have little interest in traditional success.
  5. ″The titled aristocracy of Victorian England possessed a great deal of superiority, but they were not well-known for their hard labor.″ Considering the Scientologists’ money, notoriety, and superiority complex – which is built in a belief in their magical abilities – it would have been interesting to see how they would respond to the writers’ challenge.
  • They draw on eye-opening research on the effect of stereotypes and expectations on diverse ethnic and cultural groups in order to make their arguments.
  • (White persons who were told that playing mini-golf was a test of ″sports intellect″ performed better than those who were told that it was a test of ″natural athletic ability.″) What is most encouraging about the writers’ desire to pursue an intellectual quest that others would not is their readiness to take risks.
  • The conclusion is countercultural in the finest sense of the word, arguing, quite wisely, for a corrective to the present culture of instant satisfaction while also making a larger point about how America mollycoddles its children on a national level.
  • It also confirms what we already know: that origin tales are important, and that, despite the enormous effect of external events, the story you are permitted to tell about yourself has a significant impact on how that story evolves.

The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success [Book Review]

  • Model minorities are defined as groups of people who are deemed to be more successful than the average individual. In this episode, I’m going to be evaluating a book that claims to be able to detect the characteristics that lead to success. Prepare yourself with a pen and notepad because I’m about to explain why some minority groups are able to exceed the typical individual when it comes to socioeconomic achievement. Today’s episode covers a wide range of topics, including:
  • How The Formula For Success Can Be Acquired Or Lost
  • The Double-Edged Sword Of Success
  • and many more topics.

Here’s a sample of what I talk about on the show: First and foremost, a superiority complex ″This was amazing to read since each of these groups didn’t believe they were the same as everyone else,″ says one participant.They were under the impression that they were better.’The Second Triple Package Trait Is Insecurity ‘How can you have a superiority complex while still being insecure?’ How can you be successful if you don’t have both?

  1. To be clear, the feeling of insecurity was not one that was inherent in individuals, but rather a perspective based on present circumstances and previous experience.
  2. Impulse Control is the third characteristic of the triple package.
  3. It was as if the writers had read my mind when they mentioned a well-known research as I was reading it.
  4. They then quoted that study as well!″ The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success is the book that will be featured during the show.
  • Amy Chua is an American author and activist.
  • Jed Rubenfeld is a well-known actor.
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The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success by Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld – review

The discipline, according to Samuel Smiles in Self-Help, ″will always be considered the most useful,″ he stated.″It is earned by sacrificing tiny current gratifications in order to obtain a potential bigger and better enjoyment.″ One of the many areas on which the Victorian moralist and his spiritual descendant, Amy Chua, are completely in agreement is that they both believe in the importance of education.According to Chua’s newest self-help pamphlet, The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success, co-written with her husband and fellow Yale professor Jed Rubenfeld, ″the present moment by itself is too little, too empty,″ she writes at the conclusion of the book.

  1. ″We all require a future, something larger than and above our own immediate enjoyment, toward which we might aspire or to which we believe we have made a contribution.″ Perhaps the widespread use of the term Yolo reflects the fact that there are millions of individuals for whom this realization will serve as a type of revelation, as Chua asserts in his article.
  2. To those who have dragged through The Triple Package’s last chapters with determination, the capacity to delay pleasure may well have been the driving force behind their perseverance.
  3. However, if Chua’s sermon provides a humdrum conclusion to a book that has been promoted as wildly controversial and surprising, then, as Smiles modestly admitted in 1859, the secret of worldly success is not, in fact, all that obscure, ″as the proverbs of every nation abundantly testify,″ as Smiles modestly admitted in 1859 The following are some of Smiles’s examples of his own message condensed into one sentence: ″no pains, no gains,″ ″take care of the pennies and the pounds will take care of themselves,″ and an Old Testament quote: ″go to the ant, thou sluggard,″ ″study her ways, and be wise.″ The following ″Tiger motherish″ revelation was selected at random from the last chapter, in which every sentence deserves its own sampler: ″a life that does not involve hard-won success and triumph over hurdles may not be a satisfying one.″ Even though it may please Mormons, who are in many ways the stars of The Triple Package, the preachy tone of the book is unfortunately typical of a book that attempts to elevate Chua’s bestselling wind-up Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother into a grand and instructive formula, but without any of the earlier manual’s delicious evidence of her horrible but incredibly effective child-rearing techniques (her victims go to Harvard and Yale).
  4. Chua’s updated program, which is based on prolonged anthropological hypothesis into the three habits of highly productive minority, identifies (1) a superiority complex, (2) a sense of insecurity, and (3) the ability to regulate one’s impulses as essential to a cultural group’s financial success.
  • She has replaced the amusing anecdotes from her previous book, in which she threatened to burn her children’s toys or told them they were ″garbage,″ with long lists of top and less top cultural groups and their associated quirks, which are repetitive enough to inspire guilty nostalgia for old, one-package classifications that rarely got any more complicated than vulgar Yank, cowardly Frog, lazy Egyptian, and so on.
  • Due to the lack of objective measurements, such as a giant marshmallow test pitting proud Cubans against, it is alleged, less special-feeling (and therefore poorer) Hispanics, the authors may have had no choice, if they were not to jettison the racial element, but to advance their argument, as befits the Bernard Mannings of academe, through old tropes and gags, along with anonymous anecdotes from people such as ″ Certainly, the novel would be duller if it were not for the Jewish humor (for example, when the mother refuses to attend her daughter’s inauguration as president, she says: ″Do you see that young lady up there?
  • Her brother works as a physician ″In addition, there are random cultural tags, ranging from Ayn Rand to the US sitcom Shahs of Sunset, which are typically applied without regard for coherence.
  • The fact that the accomplishments of Bellow and Roth, for example, are rarely paired with another frequent stereotype, ″Jewish American princesses,″ only serves to demonstrate, according to the writers, that ″Jewish insecurity has been reducing on numerous fronts.″ However, when ″the popular Miami blogger, radio host, and YouTube personality Pepe Billette,″ who has been quoted extensively on the proud Cuban character, turns out to be not only ″a puppet, whose real identity is a mystery,″ but a puppet who is critical of Cuban conceit, there must be a significant loss of respect.
  1. One thing is to base a great theory of UK prosperity on jokes about the usual behavior of Englishmen, Irishmen, and Scotsmen in a bar; it is quite another to evoke the archetypal English gentleman Basil Brush on our national park’s grounds.
  2. And then you have to disagree with him.
  3. As our cultural specialists continue, ″the fact is that Pepe conveyed a feeling that is undoubtedly held by the majority of Cuban Americans.″ Many pages of the book are devoted to anticipating and responding to the charge that the authors’ intellectually disreputable stereotyping racially denigrates groups that have failed to prosper because they are not sufficiently like the hyper-demanding Chinese mother or regal Nigerian-American: ″the Yoruba boast an illustrious royal lineage.″ The super-triple-package is shown here.
  4. The Mormons come to Chua’s aid, despite the fact that they are not an ethnic group, but rather exemplify, through their extraordinary wealth and self-denial, her theory, which was previously detailed in Battle Hymn, that the majority of American society, white and black, but not Chinese, is impulsive and ruinously obsessed with self-esteem.

Not to worry, Chua and Rubenfeld reassure lesser types, because there are many aspects of the triple package that are unpleasant to be around: ″If insecurity is a push to Jewish achievement, it comes at a great cost.″ Possibly a more significant disincentive for anyone contemplating the triple package road to success, which is the stated goal of this exercise, is a self-help program that self-destructs the moment it begins to produce results.Even for persons with the correct blood type, there is a fault in the design.What happens to the status-conscious Iranians or the ″famously enterprising″ Lebanese after their titanic achievements enable them to overcome the uneasiness that, according to the authors, is a critical component of the triple package of policies?

  • Amy Chua, on the other hand, has managed quite well without it.
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The triple package: what really determines success: Chua, Amy, author: Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming: Internet Archive

320 pages; 25 centimeters What is it about Jews that attracts so many Nobel Prizes and Pulitzer Prizes?What is it about Mormons that puts them in charge of the commercial and financial sectors?What is it in the children of Chinese immigrants, even those from destitute and poorly educated backgrounds, that allows them to achieve such remarkable results in school?

  1. It may be taboo to admit it, yet certain cultural groupings surpass others by a significant margin.
  2. Amy Chua, author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, and Jed Rubenfeld, author of The Interpretation of Murder, reveal the three essential components of success – its hidden spurs, inner dynamics, and potentially damaging costs – demonstrating how, when properly understood and harnessed, the Triple Package can put anyone on their chosen path to success.
  3. There are bibliographical references (pages 231-308) as well as an index.
  4. Who is successful in America?
  • – Who is the triple package?
  • It’s all about the superiority complex, insecurity, and impulse control.
  • It’s the underside of the triple package, and it’s all about I.Q., institutions, and upward mobility in America.

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The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success

An edited transcript of a podcast in which I discussed how the phrase ″model minority″ is used to characterize minority groups that are seen to be more successful than the average person.In this episode, I’m going to be evaluating a book that promises to discover the characteristics that lead to success.During the episode, we talked about a variety of topics, including: The Three Disappointing Characteristics That Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in the United States Understanding How To Acquire Or Retain The Formula For Success The Double-Edged Sword Of Success, as well as a slew of other topics: Here’s a sample of what I talk about on the show: First and foremost, a superiority complex ″This was amazing to read since each of these groups didn’t believe they were the same as everyone else,″ says one participant.

  1. They were under the impression that they were better.
  2. ″ The Insecurity Trait is the second of the Triple Package Characteristics.″ How is it possible to have a superiority complex while yet feeling uneasy at the same time?
  3. How can you be successful if you don’t have both?
  4. To be clear, the feeling of insecurity was not one that was inherent in individuals, but rather a perspective based on present circumstances and previous experience.
  • ‘When I was reading this, I immediately thought of a well-known research, which the writers subsequently referenced as if they had read my mind!″ says the third triple package trait, impulse control.

The Triple Package: What Really Determines Success: Amy Chua, Jed Rubenfeld: 9781408852293: Amazon.com: Books

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In the United States, on August 20, 2018, a verified purchase was reviewed.Amy Chua (of Chinese descent) and Jed Rubenfeld (of Jewish descent) suggest a key to understanding what it is that distinguishes some minority as successful ″tribes″ in today’s society.Over the course of my 88 years, I have seen hundreds of persons around the world, including university and graduate students, and I am continually amazed by their assessment of what defines success: Chinese, Jews, Lebanese, Mormons, immigrants as opposed to ″stay-at-home″s.″ It is extremely fascinating and, in my opinion, accurate for two law professors to participate in a social analysis.

  1. When it comes to worldly achievement, their notion is nearly like a Jungian juxtaposition of opposites (superiority and inferiority), which is distinctive of Jungian psychology.
  2. On June 27, 2014, it was reviewed in the United States, and it was verified as a purchase.
  3. This was a fantastic read.
  4. This book’s material has clearly been thoroughly studied, and it has been examined and presented in a completely compelling manner.
  • Certainly, I have gained a great lot from the experience and would suggest it to anybody with a thoughtful disposition.
  • Five out of five stars.
  • Regina Dumas is a fictional character created by author Regina Dumas.
  • Regina Dumas is a fictional character created by author Regina Dumas.
  1. In the United States of America, this product was reviewed on March 8, 2014.
  2. I like the straightforward explanation of the data that demonstrated why they reached to a conclusion, but I did not appreciate all of the repetition.
  3. On June 7, 2016, it was reviewed in the United States and verified as a purchase.
  4. Although it somewhat fulfilled my expectations, it did not go quite far enough.

On August 25, 2014, it was reviewed in the United States and verified as a purchase.This is an excellent book.Excellent Recommendation verified purchase reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2015Verified Purchase Pretty good, actually.

  • It makes for interesting conversation.
  • verified purchaseReviewed in the United States on October 24, 2014Verified Purchase I felt the book was excellent since it had a wide range of information that I found to be both informative and entertaining.
  • On October 15, 2014, a review was conducted in the United States.
  • According to Chua and Rubenstein, a Triple Package of traits is required for success, albeit their argument is not definitive.
  • They define success in terms of economic security for the sake of convenience, while acknowledging that the concept of success is a matter of personal preference.
  • The Triple Package is made up of three components: a sense of collective superiority, a sense of personal inadequacy, and the capacity to control one’s own desires.

In the book, however, this concept is not fully explored.Moreover, no attempt is made to explain the remarkable innovations of previous centuries, which were essentially the work of men of wealth and security.Is it possible that humility, rather than a sense of uneasiness, is a more trustworthy second leg of the Triple Package stool?They point out that a young America had the Triple Package in spades while they were growing up.In our insecurity at the border of a new and completely unknown nation, we were prepared to undergo enormous hardship and take huge risks in order to prove ourselves to our European ″superiors.″ While Americans unquestionably maintain a heightened feeling of ″specialness,″ it’s arguable whether we have lost the humility required to acknowledge any amount of shortcoming in our lives.Unfortunately, there is no such thing as impulse control – the willingness to sacrifice present enjoyment in exchange for a future reward.

  1. According to Chua and Rubenstein, numerous groups have achieved economic success despite the fact that they have had to overcome social barriers.
  2. The accomplishments of Chinese, Japanese, Jewish, and Lebanese immigrants, to name a few examples, are discussed in depth throughout the book.
  3. The authors raise an interesting point, namely that high success leads unavoidably to a lack of uncertainty, which, in turn, undermines the possibility of greater success.
  1. As a group, African-Americans are grossly and obviously underperforming practically everyone else in the United States.
  2. Chua and Rubenstein move deftly around this gloomy reality with the grace of a Bob Fosse dance troupe.
  3. In lieu of confronting the fact that slavery is a relatively recent phenomena, they are satisfied to excuse their inability to attain success on the legacy of slavery.
  4. In the 1940s and 1950s, blacks in America were making economic success relative to whites, but this was not precisely a moment of racial peace and tolerance in the country.
  5. Blacks were making steady progress, despite the fact that they lacked one of the Three Pillars of Success – an attitude of group superiority – though it could be argued that strong religious faith instilled in the black ″community″ an attitude of specialness, which helped to accelerate their progress.
  • There was a steady upward movement, which was supported by the remaining two legs – a sense of insecurity and an intense need to prove themselves to others.
  • They were making good progress.
  • What exactly happened?
  • As a result of initiatives by the government to ease economic uncertainty and personal pain, the authors claim that people in the United States have lost their ability to regulate their impulses (Social Security, welfare, school lunches, affirmative action, etc).
  • And they are unquestionably accurate.
  • The dramatic drop in not just black, but also lower-class white economic mobility was sparked by misguided government anti-poverty initiatives, which stripped recipients of their dignity by denying them the ability to sustain themselves.
  1. The destructiveness of government poverty programs has been examined extensively elsewhere, and it is not necessary to go into detail about it here.
  2. As a whole, the book provides some intriguing insights into the human attitudes and actions that are most likely to result in observable disparities between those who have and those who do not, but it is difficult to persuade people who believe in the more prevalent victim/exploiter storyline.

Top reviews from other countries

3.0 stars out of 5 for this product The article is lengthy.The article was reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 15, 2016.Purchase that has been verified The casing has been constructed really nicely.

  1. There are some attitudes that will assist an individual in achieving success, and if such attitudes are widespread amongst a group, then that group will do well, and even better than those groups who do not have those attitudes.
  2. Several illustrations are provided: Indians, Jews, and Lebanese live in the United States (and other countries).
  3. And the third generation of those immigrant groups does less well because they have’made it’ and no longer have one of the attitudes—namely, the chip on the shoulder—that characterized the previous generations.
  4. The examples are highly persuasive, and the reason why the third generation does not do as well as the first is tied back to the first point.
  • It is difficult to keep engaged in the book, though, due to the way it drags the argument out over a long period of time.
  • I believed the thesis would have made a good story for a Sunday newspaper, and I was right.
  • It is tough to turn it into a full-length book (even if the bibliography and notes make up a quarter of the book – I did not bother to read that part).
  • This is an interesting thesis.
  1. It has taken much too long for development to be completed.
  2. 3.0 stars out of 5 for this product Although an interesting concept, it is very superficial.
  3. On August 13, 2019, a review was conducted in the United Kingdom.
  4. Purchase that has been verified I loved Tiger Mom, but this is a little too far a stretch, with an almost eugenics air to it, which I didn’t appreciate.

It’s well-written and well-thought-out, but I found the evidence to be a little thin on the ground because it relies exclusively on individuals to represent entire ethnic groups, rather than on groups as a whole.In the future, specialists in sociology and anthropology could be a better resource than law academics for me to learn more about these subjects.a rating of 2.0 out of 5 stars A theory that is overstuffed with anecdotes.

  • verified purchase reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 8, 2015 After the first three chapters, it becomes tedious.
  • A discussion on how Jews, Asians, and certain other civilizations have cultural characteristics that are conducive to becoming successful is developed.
  • Despite the fact that it is replete with historical allusions and stories, it comes off as an overstuffed argument.
  • 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product Tell your liberal friends that ‘the small guy’ can make it in the world!
  • On May 5, 2014, a reviewer in the United Kingdom expressed satisfaction with their purchase.
  • On the basis of Thomas Sowell’s recommendation here, I purchased the book, and it did not disappoint, as it was both educational and motivating.

It is concerned with the role played by a culture in the economic and intellectual achievement of its people.It appears that many of the prejudices regarding these groups are valid as well.What is true in America is also true to a considerable extent in the United Kingdom.For me, the most significant factor is simply that Chinese and Indian children are studying up to four times as much as their natural-born counterparts, and as a result, they are outperforming them in school examinations and the job market.That they had to spend so much time in interviews defending the book against accusations of racism is a disappointment.This is really ridiculous.

  1. Anybody who has a negative opinion of this book hasn’t truly read it, in my opinion.
  2. A hundred pages of references from academic research and data-sets comprise the whole book, which is just an explanation of what they have discovered—and it is the correct explanation for what they have observed.
  3. 4.0 stars out of 5 for this product An explanation of the factors that influence the academic success of children from minority backgrounds.
  1. Purchased on March 13, 2014 in France and reviewed on March 13, 2014 in France.
  2. This book is based on an examination of the educational achievements of children in the United States in relation to their family and community of origin (the statistics available in the United States allow for the classification of results by ethnic or religious group).
  3. In general, Jewish and Mormon students, as well as children of Chinese, Korean, Indian, Iranian, and Nigerian ancestry, outperform their non-Jewish and non-Muslim peers, including those from large afro-American and Hispanic communities, as well as those from white Protestant majority communities.
  4. Naturally, there are no statistically significant results – some Hispanic Americans succeeded, while others of Chinese descent failed – but rather statistically significant average results.
  5. According to the authors, the characteristics that distinguish the successful categories from the unsuccessful ones are three cultural traits that are strongly transmitted through parental education: a sense of collective superiority, anxiety associated with a sense of insecurity, and the ability to self-discipline.
  • The overall argumentation and persuasiveness of the piece are strong, despite the fact that it is limited in scope due to the fact that it only deals with the situation in the United States.
  • However, for the French who are preoccupied with the widespread educational failure in the ZEP, it sends a very encouraging message since it demonstrates unequivocally that self-discipline is a learned trait rather than an inborn one.
  • As someone who is personally involved in educational volunteerism on the topic of self-discipline (), I was delighted to discover in this book more justifications for the need of working to increase the persistence of students in underprivileged neighborhoods.
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Can a ″Triple Package″ of Personality Traits Explain Success?

The ″tiger mother″ hypothesis has been disproved by scientific evidence.Subscribe to the free newsletters from Scientific American.″ data-newsletterpromo article-image=″ data-newsletterpromo article-button-text=″Sign Up″ data-newsletterpromo article-button-link=″ name=″articleBody″ itemprop=″articleBody″> ″ data-newsletterpromo article-button-text=″Sign Up″ data-newsletterpromo article-button-link=″ Amy Chua, a Yale law professor, rose to national prominence in 2011 after writing her memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, which chronicled her strict parenting method and became a best-seller.

  1. Because of her shock-value anecdotes, Chua garnered a great deal of media attention, such as the time she threatened to burn all of her daughter’s stuffed animals as punishment for performing poorly on the piano.
  2. The author, Chua, asserts that her parenting approaches were not only typical of Chinese immigrants, but also explained why Chinese Americans, on average, surpassed other ethnic groups in terms of scholastic achievement.
  3. In 2010, Chua partnered with her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, a fellow Yale law professor, to create a book that makes even bolder statements about how cultural variations explain discrepancies in achievement among different groups.
  4. Chua and Rubenfeld believe in their book The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America that a unique mix of three personality traits is the secret to achieving success.
  • One’s conviction in the superiority of one’s own group, a proclivity for emotions of insecurity, and the capacity to control one’s impulses are the three characteristics listed above.
  • Individuals who come from cultures that place a strong emphasis on these three characteristics, according to the book, tend to achieve better.
  • As examples of their theory in action, Chua and Rubenfeld cite the greater success of Mormons, Nigerians, Persians, Cubans, Indians, East Asians, Lebanese, and Jews as well as the greater success of other minorities.
  • It was received with fierce hostility, notably from Asian Americans who objected to what they perceived as the reinforcement of the ″model minority″ image — that Asian Americans tend to achieve well because of a cultural emphasis on work ethic, family values, and conformity — in their writings.
  1. (Chua is of Chinese descent.) The model minority stereotype, like other stereotypes, fails to recognize the enormous diversity that exists within the Asian American population, as well as the difficulties that many people within that group endure.
  2. Some critics praised the book for its candid discussion of an important question: why do some groups in America, on average, perform better than others?
  3. The book received positive reviews from readers as well.
  4. Upon closer examination, it becomes clear that Chua and Rubenfeld’s argument is fundamentally psychological rather than cultural: they claim that a certain mix of psychological qualities might explain success, and they believe that people from certain groups are more likely to possess these features.

Two studies with a combined online sample of over 1200 individuals from a variety of ethnic origins were conducted by Joshua Hart and Christopher Chabris, both psychology professors at Union College, in order to objectively evaluate the ″triple package″ concept.The researchers purposefully opted to analyze a representative sample of Americans rather than members of the successful groups cited by Chua and Rubenfeld because they believed this would provide a more thorough test of the theory’s validity.The existence of these three characteristics predicts success independent of one’s ethnic or cultural group, which allows us to be more confident in concluding that it is the mix of characteristics – rather than some other factor – that leads to higher success.

  • One scale was used to assess respondents’ levels of agreement with statements such as ″Most other cultures are backward when compared to my culture.″ The first trait in the triple package, a belief in the superiority of one’s own group, was measured using a scale that asked respondents how much they agreed with statements such as ″Most other cultures are backward when compared to my culture.″ When it comes to measuring insecurity, the second feature was a little more difficult, since Chua and Rubenfeld claim in their book that insecurity may manifest itself in a variety of ways, including low self-esteem, emotions of danger, or fear of losing what one already has.
  • As a result, the researchers used a variety of gauges to assess feelings of insecurity.
  • Their findings were based on a combination of the scores obtained from their participants on these measures, which revealed three distinct sources of uncertainty: personal insecurity, contingent self-worth, and familial insecurity.
  • To assess ″control,″ the third attribute, the researchers utilized measures measuring impulsiveness, conscientiousness, and tenacity, among other things.
  • The cognitive capacities of the subjects were also assessed by the researchers, who administered vocabulary and mathematical reasoning tests.
  • Despite the fact that Chua and Rubenfeld’s hypothesis does not place a high emphasis on intelligence, previous research has demonstrated that general cognitive ability are one of the most powerful indicators of success and performance.

Finally, in order to assess their participants’ degree of life achievement, Hart and Chabris asked them to report on their annual income, level of education, and honors and distinctions they had won.All of these indicators of success were merged to form a single ″success″ variable that represented the sum of all of them.For this study, the researchers performed regression analysis to establish the strength of the link between the personality qualities and self-reported levels of accomplishment.In contrast to Chua and Rubenfeld’s triple package theory of characteristics, the data did not support this idea.The people who reported the greatest degree of success did not always score highly on all three characteristics.Instead, cognitive ability and parental education were shown to be the most significant indicators of future success.

  1. Furthermore, in direct opposition to Chua and Rubenfeld’s argument, higher levels of personal insecurity were found to be associated with lower levels of success in life.
  2. There were, however, a few of isolated studies that did provide credence to some aspects of the triple package concept, which were discussed below.
  3. Participants who scored higher on the contingent self-worth scale reported higher levels of achievement.
  1. People who have a high contingent self-worth are more likely to rely on external conditions, such as the approval of others, in order to feel good about themselves.
  2. If someone has a strong desire for external acceptance, it makes reasonable that they will put out greater effort to obtain outward success.
  3. A tiny but statistically significant relationship was found between emotions of group supremacy and the ability to earn a greater wage.
  4. Additional findings In other words, the more the participants’ sense of superiority toward their own ethnic group, the greater the amount of money they reported making.
  5. The researchers discovered no consistent evidence that a unique mix of the three attributes – group supremacy, personal insecurity, and impulse control, for example, – led to better success despite the numerous individual findings in favor of the idea.
  • If Chua and Rubenfeld’s hypothesis cannot explain the success of specific organizations, then what theory could possibly explain this phenomenon?
  • In their paper, Hart and Chabris point out that, while it may sound enticing to believe that we can identify a collection of learnable attributes that influence success, there is no evidence to support such a hypothesis.
  • The concept of a ″triple package″ may appeal to us since it appears to correspond to our own personal observations as well as prevalent assumptions about immigration in general.
  • Furthermore, the notion is consistent with the belief that one’s ability to succeed is determined by one’s hard effort and personal traits rather than one’s surroundings.
  • However, as far as we can tell, success may be attributed to such unexpected variables as intelligence, hard work, and having the good fortune of growing up in a financially secure family.
  • Are you a scientist with a specialty in neuroscience, cognitive science, or psychology?
  1. If so, we’d like to hear from you.
  2. Are there any recent peer-reviewed papers that you’d like to write about that you haven’t read yet?
  3. Please direct any recommendations to Gareth Cook, editor of Mind Matters.

Best American Infographics is edited by Gareth, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who can be reached at garethideas AT gmail.com or on Twitter @garethideas.Gareth is the series editor of Best American Infographics.

According to scientific evidence, the ″tiger mother″ theory is false.You may sign up for free newsletters from Science Magazine.If you want to sign up for our newsletter, click here.

  1. ″ data-newsletterpromo article-image″ data-newsletterpromo article-button-text=″Sign Up″ data-newsletterpromo article-button-link=″ name=″articleBody″ itemprop=″articleBody″> If you want to sign up for our newsletter, click here.
  2. When Amy Chua, a Yale law professor, published her memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother in 2011, she instantly became a national figure.
  3. In it, she documented her strict parenting method.
  4. For her shock value tales, such as the time she threatened to burn all of her daughter’s stuffed animals as a punishment for performing poorly on the piano, Chua garnered a great deal of attention from the media.
  • Chua asserts that her parenting methods were not only typical of Chinese immigrants, but also explained why Chinese Americans, on average, surpassed other ethnic groups in terms of scholastic achievement.
  • It was three years later that Chua teamed up with fellow Yale law professor Jed Rubenfeld to publish a book that makes even bolder assertions about how cultural variations explain discrepancies in achievement across different groups of people.
  • Chua and Rubenfeld believe in their book The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America that a unique mix of three personality traits is the secret to achieving greatness.
  • One’s conviction in the superiority of one’s own group, a proclivity for emotions of insecurity, and the capacity to control one’s impulses are the three characteristics listed above: Individuals who come from cultures that place a strong emphasis on these three characteristics, according to the book, tend to do better..
  1. As instances of their theory in action, Chua and Rubenfeld cite the better success of Mormons, Nigerians, Persians, Cubans, Indians, East Asians, Lebanese, and Jews as well as the greater success of Iranians and Iranian immigrants.
  2. Chua and Rubenfeld’s book was met with fierce opposition, particularly from Asian Americans who objected to what they perceived as the perpetuation of the ″model minority″ stereotype — the idea that Asian Americans tend to do well because of a cultural emphasis on work ethic, family values, and conformity.
  3. The Chinese word for Chua is ″Chua.″ The model minority stereotype, like other stereotypes, fails to recognize the enormous diversity that exists within the Asian American population, as well as the difficulties that many people within that group are experiencing right now.
  4. The book also earned positive reviews from critics, who praised it for its candid exploration of an essential question: why do some groups in America, on average, perform better than others.

Upon closer examination, it becomes clear that Chua and Rubenfeld’s theory is ultimately psychological rather than cultural: they propose that a specific combination of psychological traits can explain success, and they believe that people from specific groups are more likely to possess these traits.Using two research with a combined online sample of more than 1200 people from a variety of ethnic backgrounds, Union College psychology professors Joshua Hart and Christopher Chabris sought to objectively examine the ″triple package″ concept.Rather than include members of the successful groups indicated by Chua and Rubenfeld in their study, the researchers decided to investigate a representative sample of Americans in order to provide a more rigorous test of their theory.

  • If the existence of these three characteristics predicts success independent of one’s ethnic or cultural group, one may more definitely assume that it is the mix of characteristics – rather than some other factor – that is responsible for higher success.
  • It was determined how much respondents agreed with statements such as ″Most other civilizations are behind when compared to my culture″ using a scale that scored the first attribute of the triple package, a conviction in the superiority of one’s own group.
  • Because Chua and Rubenfeld claim in their book that insecurity may manifest itself in a variety of ways, including low self-esteem, emotions of danger, or a fear of losing what one has already obtained, measuring insecurity proved to be a more difficult task.
  • The researchers used a variety of questionnaires to assess feelings of insecurity.
  • Their findings were based on a combination of the scores obtained from their participants on these measures, which revealed three distinct sources of uncertainty: personal insecurity, contingent self-worth, and familial instability They employed measures of impulsiveness, conscientiousness, and grit to measure ″control,″ the third attribute.
  • Using language and mathematical reasoning tests, the researchers assessed their subjects’ cognitive ability as well.

In spite of the fact that Chua and Rubenfeld’s hypothesis does not place a heavy emphasis on intelligence, previous research has demonstrated that general cognitive ability are one of the most powerful determinants of success.The last measure of life success used by Hart and Chabris was a survey in which they requested information on their yearly income, degree of education, as well as honors and awards obtained.A single, combined ″success″ variable was created by combining all of these different measures of success.For this study, the researchers utilized regression analysis to establish the strength of the link between the personality characteristics and self-reported levels of achievement.In contrast to Chua and Rubenfeld’s triple package theory of characteristics, the data did not support this hypothesis.In this study, those who reported the most success did not always score well on all three characteristics.

  1. As a result, cognitive ability and parental education were found to be the most significant determinants of success.
  2. A further finding showed that higher personal uneasiness was associated with lower levels of life achievement, which was a blatant contradiction to Chua and Rubenfeld’s argument.
  3. The triple package concept was supported in part by a few of isolated observations, which were discussed more below.
  1. Higher contingent self-worth scores were associated with better achievement among participants.
  2. People who have a high contingent self-worth are more likely to rely on external conditions, such as the approval of others, in order to feel good about their lives.
  3. If someone has a strong desire for external acceptance, it makes reasonable that they will put out more effort to obtain outward success.
  4. A tiny but statistically significant relationship was found between emotions of group supremacy and the ability to earn a higher salary.
  5. In other words, the more the participants’ sense of superiority toward their own ethnic group, the greater the amount of money they claimed to have earned.
  • However, despite the numerous individual findings in favor of the idea, Hart and Chabris discovered no consistent evidence that the unique mix of the three attributes – group supremacy, personal insecurity, and impulse control – is what causes better success.
  • After all, if the theories of Chua and Rubenfeld are unable to explain the success of particular organizations, what might?
  • They point out that, while it may sound enticing to believe that we can identify a collection of learnable attributes that influence success, there is no evidence to support such a hypothesis.
  • The concept of a ″triple package″ may appeal to us since it appears to correspond to our own personal observations as well as prevalent perceptions about immigrants and their contributions.
  • It also fits well with the concept that success is determined by one’s own hard work and personal attributes, rather than by one’s environment or genetic makeup.
  • However, as far as we can tell, success may be attributed to such unexpected variables as intelligence, hard work, and having the good fortune of growing up in a financially secure family.
  1. Are you a scientist with a specialty in neuroscience, cognitive science, or psychology?
  2. If so, we’d love to hear from you.
  3. Are there any recent peer-reviewed papers that you’d want to write about that you’ve read recently?
See also:  How Much Are Postage Stamps At The Post Office?

Gareth Cook, editor of Mind Matters, welcomes your comments and suggestions.Best American Infographics is edited by Gareth, a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer who can be reached at garethideas AT gmail.com or on Twitter @garethideas.Gareth is also the author of Best American Infographics.

Amy Chua: What Really Determines Success – Nordic Business Report

A quest to learn what motivates people, communities, and corporations is now underway.Amy Chua is not one to be afraid of speaking something that will not be liked by everyone.A new book, The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America, co-authored with her husband and Yale colleague Jed Rubenfeld, introduces the thesis that being successful as an individual, a nation, or an organization is linked to three distinct characteristics.

  1. When Chua’s book, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, about her rigorous Chinese upbringing, became a blockbuster, she became known as the ″Tiger Mom.″ Chua is the daughter of Chinese immigrants and the John M.
  2. Duff Jr.
  3. Professor of Law at Yale Law School.
  4. She intended to investigate why particular ethnic groups, such as Mormons or Nigerians or Jews or Indian-Americans seem to be disproportionately represented at the highest echelons of American society in her fourth book, which she called ″The Mormon Myth.″ During her lecture at the annual Nordic Business Forum in Helsinki, she also discussed her findings on the subject of success.
  • We uncovered three characteristics that are available to anybody and that yield disproportionate success,″ argues Chua.
  • This dynamic is applicable everywhere there is a group of people.

Three elements that lead to success

  • In the first place, there is a superiority complex.
  • A superiority complex is defined as having a ″deep-seated sense of exceptionality″ in one’s own mind.
  • This instills self-assurance and courage.
  • The second component is a feeling of insecurity or an inferiority complex..
  • People must have the impression that they aren’t quite good enough and that they have something to prove to themselves.

This is in opposition to the superiority complex, which is exactly as it should be, according to Chua.The third component of the triple package is impulse control; a person’s ability to exercise self-control is required.The Finnish term ″sisu″ is used to explain impulse control; it is defined as a combination of boldness and courage, fury and tenacity, as well as the capacity to battle on even when most others would give up and to fight with the desire to win.

How do superiority and inferiority go together?

  • A successful person is expected to feel both superior and inferior, which is why it’s usual to be little taken aback when you discover this.
  • What is the procedure for doing this?
  • It is the confluence of these two factors that provides motivation, according to Chua.
  • Insecure people who are also superior have a chip on their shoulder, which motivates them to work hard in order to get attention and respect.
  • Steve Jobs is a great example of the triple package in the business world.

No matter how successful he became, she believes he had to continue to strive for more and greater accomplishments.Jobs was well-known as a perfectionist who was not afraid to be brutal in his pursuit of innovation.When viewed in this light, identifying examples of how superiority and inferiority function together isn’t all that difficult.The triple package characteristics are frequently readily apparent when examining the careers of famous sports, actors, politicians, and artists.

Can a superiority complex be a good thing?

  • A superiority complex may be quite dangerous, and parents should never encourage their children to be arrogant in their behavior.
  • However, in The Triple Package, Chua makes the case that some types of superiority – such as those based on work ethic, morality, or self-control – may have a positive influence on a person’s life if they are anchored in these characteristics.
  • People in immigrant households have a tendency to instill a sense of superiority based on their achievements.
  • According to Chua, ″you may bootstrap yourself to the point where you feel remarkable.″ ″You shown tenacity and discipline in achieving a level of achievement that others were unable to achieve.″

Working to understand success

  • A superiority complex may be extremely dangerous, and parents should never encourage their children to be arrogant in any way.
  • While certain types of superiority – such as those based on work ethic, excellent morals, or self-control – can be detrimental to a person’s life, author Chua argues in The Triple Package that some forms of superiority can be beneficial.
  • Individuals in immigrant households are more likely than other people to develop a sense of superiority based on their achievements.
  • According to Chua, ″you may bootstrap yourself to the point where you feel outstanding.″ ″You shown tenacity and discipline in achieving a level of achievement that others were unable to achieve.

The triple package and business

  • Chua speculates that many of those in the audience are employed by small businesses as they look away from the stage.
  • Smaller businesses must be innovative and adaptable in order to succeed in sectors dominated by giants.
  • ″You have to accomplish more with less,″ says Chua, adding that the triple package might be beneficial in this situation.
  • There is a lot of discussion concerning the mission of a company.
  • What is the significance of this?

It aids in instilling a feeling of uniqueness in workers and allowing them to feel like they are a part of something meaningful and significant.That is a manifestation of the superiority complex.Companies should also foster an environment in which employees are always learning and trying to do better.That is a manifestation of the inferiority complex.Impulse management must begin at the top of the organization and work its way down to the individual employees.

  • Chua asserts that in order to be successful in business, one must make investments in the future, which entails taking chances, failing, and trying again a second time.
  • All of this necessitates patience and the acceptance of short-term discomfort (the opposite of instant gratification).
  • Her theory of productivity is that ″pulse control is the secret sauce of productivity.″ With so many messages and applications competing for our attention, we must make the decision to exercise impulse control.
  • And, fortunately, with practice, impulse control may be developed and improved even more.
  • In the same breath, Chua advises everyone not to lose sight of the joy that life has to offer: ″Don’t gaze so far into the future that you lose sight of what makes life worthwhile to begin with.
  1. This article is a section of the Executive Summary of the Nordic Business Forum 2016, which can be found here.
  2. You may get a digital copy of the summary by clicking on the link below.
  3. Obtain a copy of the Executive Summary

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